Subject: Studies in the News 07-05 (January 25, 2007)


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News


California -- One Hundred and Fifty Years Ago

January 1857 - "The Fort Tejon earthquake of 1857 was one of the greatest earthquakes ever recorded in the U.S., and left an amazing surface rupture scar over 350 kilometers in length along the San Andreas fault. Yet, despite the immense scale of this quake, only two people were reported killed by the effects of the shock -- a woman at Reed's Ranch near Fort Tejon was killed by the collapse of an adobe house, and an elderly man fell dead in a plaza in the Los Angeles area.The fact that only two lives were lost was primarily due to the the nature of the quake's setting; California in 1857 was sparsely populated, especially in the regions of strongest shaking, and this fact, along with good fortune, kept the loss of life to a minimum. The effects of the quake were quite dramatic, even frightening. http://www.data.scec.org/chrono_index/forttejo.html"    

January 1857 - " All around southern and central California, the strong shaking caused by the 1857 shock was reported to have lasted for at least one minute, possibly two or three!... As a result of the shaking, the current of the Kern River was turned upstream, and water ran four feet deep over its banks. The waters of Tulare Lake were thrown upon its shores, stranding fish miles from the original lake bed. The waters of the Mokelumne River were thrown upon its banks, reportedly leaving the bed dry in places. The Los Angeles River was reportedly flung out of its bed, too. Cracks appeared in the ground near San Bernadino and in the San Gabriel Valley http://www.data.scec.org/chrono_index/forttejo.html "    

Contents This Week

Introductory Material CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT
   Lessons from Safe Kids/Safe Streets program
   Rural environments conceal violence against aging women
   Border fence may be more expensive
   Special Master CYA report
   State responsibility for offender reentry
CULTURE AND SOCIETY
   Consequences of killing affirmative action
ECONOMY
   Consumers without options for banking
   Brain drain threatening biotech firms
   Payday loan industry creates growing debt
   Television violence leading to fear and anxiety
EDUCATION
   No Child Left Behind achievement gaps
   Holes in school accountability
   Innovations in successful charter schools
   California ranking in chance-for-success
   Criticism of UC's expansion planning
ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES
   Off-highway fuel tax study urges park funding cuts
   As Atlantic warms, more fires predicted in West
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
   Unlimited ballot measure contributions allowed
   Groups can sue over at-large elections
   Survey shows support for citizen's assembly
   Evacuation planning for disadvantaged populations
   Court strikes federal authority in Indian gambling
   Public pension funds are shaky
   Revenue capacity differs among states
HEALTH
   Healthy Families Program needs more funding
   USDA declares cloned meat safe
   Financial incentives for physicians dominate
   Methods to negotiate prescription prices
   Stem cells in amniotic fluid show promise
HOUSING
   California housing market failing most families
HUMAN SERVICES
   Parental communication about adolescent risk behavior
   Child care rating system needed
   Children need more help with health, education
   California has most homeless in the U.S.
   Parents polled on greatest worries
STUDIES TO COME
   Green design for hospitals
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News is a very current compilation of items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau to supplement the public policy debate in California’s Capitol. To help share the latest information with state policymakers, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library’s website. This week's list of current articles in various public policy areas is presented below.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • California State Employees may contact the State Information & Reference Center (916-654-0206; cslsirc@library.ca.gov) with the SITN issue number and the item number [S#].

  • All other interested individuals should contact their local library - the items may be available there, or may be borrowed by your local library on your behalf.

The following studies are currently on hand:

CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT

CHILD ABUSE

Lessons Learned from Safe Kids/Safe Streets. By Roberta Cronin and others, Westat. Juvenile Justice Bulletin. (Office of Justice and Delinquency Prevention, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, DC) November 2006. 12 p.

Full Text at: www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/ojjdp/213682.pdf

[“Child abuse and neglect may place youth at risk for delinquency, criminality, and other problem behaviors. Safe Kids/Safe Streets represents a comprehensive application of collaborative approaches in the child maltreatment field.... OJJDP believes that these experiences will help other jurisdictions develop, sustain, and enhance collaborative efforts that will reduce child abuse and neglect and their aftereffects.”]

[Request #S70501]

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DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

“Intimate Partner Violence of Rural Aging Women.” By Pamela B. Teaster and others. IN: Family Relations, vol. 55, no. 5 (December 2006) pp. 636-648.

[“Although reports of intimate partner violence (IPV) decrease with age, a significant number of aging women experience IPV in their relationships. The structure and culture of rural environments may inadvertently conceal violence against aging women and inhibit prevention and treatment efforts.... Findings revealed multiple interacting influences…including the women's families and resources, culture and locality, religion, community support, and government entities.”]

[Request #S70502]

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IMMIGRATION

Border Security: Barriers Along the U.S. International Border. By Blas Nuñez-Neto and Stephen Viña, Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress. (The Service, Washington, DC) December 12, 2006. 45 p.

Full Text at: fpc.state.gov/documents/organization/78475.pdf

["A hotly disputed fence on the U.S.-Mexico border will cost more than $60 billion -- nearly 10 times more than original estimates -- with billions more needed for land acquisition and maintenance. While officials have estimated that the 850-mile fence will cost $7 billion to erect, the report notes that maintenance could cost as much as $70 million per mile over its 25-year life span and that miles of private property in Texas still must be purchased." San Francisco Chronicle (January 8, 2007) 1.]

[Request #S70503]

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JUVENILE DETENTION CENTERS

Margaret Farrell v. Roderick Hickman. Alameda County Superior Court. RG03079344. Third Report of Special Master. December 7, 2006. 21 p.

Full Text at: www.prisonlaw.com/pdfs/DJJSMReport3.pdf

["To fix its failing youth prison system, the Division on Juvenile Justice (DJJ) is now charged with implementing a series of remedial plans developed by experts to correct deficiencies identified by the parties in the case.... Based on early expert reports, the parties identified six key areas in need of reform: safety and welfare, education, medical care, mental health, sexual behavior treatment and access for wards with disabilities.... The Special Master announced a shift in the ongoing DJJ reform—from planning to implementation." Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice (January 2007) 1.]

[Request #S70504]

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SEXUAL OFFENDERS

Constitutional Collectivism and Ex-Offender Residence Exclusion Zones. By Wayne A. Logan. IN: Iowa Law Review, vol. 92, no. 1 (January 2007) pp. 1-41.

["State efforts to limit where ex-offenders (those convicted of sex crimes in particular) can live have thus far withstood constitutional challenge, with courts deferring to the police power of states. This deference, however, ignores the negative externalities created when states jettison their human dross.... The article discusses ... the state expulsionist tendencies and invokes the Court’s decisions invalidating state laws barring entry of the poor and solid waste. In both instances the courts invalidated the laws because they betrayed the national imperative of dealing with challenges faced by all states."]

[Request #S70505]

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CULTURE AND SOCIETY

AFFIRMATIVE ACTION

Killing Affirmative Action: Would Ending It Really Result in a More Perfect Union? By Ellis Close. (The Institute for Justice and Journalism, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California) 2006. 42 p.

Full Text at: www.justicejournalism.org/images/cose/Affirm_Final_PDF.pdf

[“The number of minorities winning government contracts and being admitted to public colleges and universities in California has dwindled since a ballot measure was passed 10 years ago outlawing preferential treatment for minorities in those areas. At UC Berkeley and UCLA, the impact of Proposition 209 was immediate: The number of black and Hispanic freshmen admitted the year after the law took effect fell by half. In California's transportation system, two-thirds of the minority contractors certified to do business with the state when the law went into effect have folded. The question is whether Americans, decades after Jim Crow, still feel legally obligated to help boost people whose race puts them at an economic and educational disadvantage.” Washington Post (November 17, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S70507]

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ECONOMY

BANKING

Financial Empowerment for the Unbanked and Underbanked Consumer: Crossing the Red Line. By the Center for African-American Policy, University of Denver. (The Center, Denver, Colorado) January 2007. 10 p.

Full Text at: www.blackpolicy.org/resources/CCR3.pdf

["This report reveals that higher concentrations of lower credit scores in an area erode consumer banking options and create a cycle where there are few opportunities to improve credit scores.... The study found the need for financial services still exists in many communities, leading fringe, non-mainstream, financial services companies to enter the marketplace."]

[Request #S70508]

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BIOTECHNOLOGY INDUSTRY

Impact 2007: Innovative Science: Delivering Global Cures. By BayBio. (BayBio, San Francisco, California) December 2006. 25 p.

Full Text at: www.baybio.org/pdf/IMPACT07_Policy.pdf

[“With about 300 medical products on the market and nearly 400 more in late-stage tests, Northern California biotechnology companies are on the cusp of a commercial explosion. But competition from other states and countries where it is cheaper to operate, with fewer government regulations, could woo many local companies elsewhere.... The government must do more to help the industry thrive.” San Jose Mercury News (December 6, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S70509]

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LOANS AND CREDIT

Financial Quicksand: Payday Lending Sinks Borrowers in Debt With $4.2 Billion in Predatory Fees Every Year. By Uriah King and others, Center for Responsible Lending . (The Center, Durham, North Carolina) November 30, 2006. 30 p.

Full Text at: www.responsiblelending.org/pdfs/rr012-Financial_Quicksand-1106.pdf

[“Countless people across the country are visiting payday lenders this month to get advances of a few hundred dollars to help with holiday expenses. While such lending is effectively banned in 11 states through usury or other laws, it is flourishing in the other 39...[Payday lending costs for California for 2005 are $365 million.].” New York Times (December 23, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S70510]

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MEDIA INDUSTRY

Dying to Entertain: Violence on Prime Time Broadcast Television: 1998-2006. By the Parents Television Council. (The Council, Los Angeles, California) January 2007. 24 p.

Full Text at: www.parentstv.org/PTC/publications/reports/violencestudy/DyingtoEntertain.pdf

["The television season that began in the fall of 2005 was one of the most violent in recent history -- averaging 4.41 instances of violence per hour during prime time -- an increase of 75% since the 1998 television season.... Viewing violent content is associated with intense emotional responses of fear and anxiety among both children and teenagers."]

[Request #S70511]

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EDUCATION

ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

Is The No Child Left Behind Act Working? The Reliability of How States Track Achievement. By Bruce Fuller, Policy Analysis for California Education, University of California, Berkeley, and others. Working Paper 06-1. (The University, Berkeley, California) 2006. Various pagings.

Full Text at: pace.berkeley.edu/NCLB/WP06-01_Web.pdf

[“Affluent children score higher than poor children on standardized tests, and Asians and whites do better than blacks and Latinos. The No Child Left Behind Act was supposed to help change that. But as Congress prepares to reconsider the legislation this year, there are few indications that achievement gaps have been shrinking. In California, middle-class students' performance on state exams continues to exceed poor students' performance at about the same rate as three years ago. ” San Bernardino Sun (December 14, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S70512]

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Failing Our Future: The Holes in California's School Accountability System and How to Fix Them. By Lance T. Izumi, Pacific Research Institute, and others. (The Institute, San Francisco, California) January 2007

["Research shows that state school accountability systems have a positive impact on student achievement, but only when states accurately track schools’ academic performance and attach interventions or rewards to the performance or non-performance of schools. California’s school accountability system, the Academic Performance Index, is unfortunately severely deficient in this crucial area of identifying what’s working or not working in schools. [This report] reveals the shortcomings of California’s current school accountability system in contrast to the federal No Child Left Behind Act."]

Report. 98 p.
http://www.cbee.org/PDFs/FOF_Final_Report.pdf

Executive Summary. 4 p.
http://www.cbee.org/PDFs/FOF_Exec_Sum.pdf

[Request #S70513]

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CHARTER SCHOOLS

Innovations in Education: Successful Charter Schools. By WestEd. Prepared for the Office of Innovation and Improvement, U.S. Department of Education. (The Department, Washington, DC) 2006. 84 p.

Full Text at: www.ed.gov/admins/comm/choice/charterhs/report.pdf

[“Gateway High School is a standout among the nation's charter schools, using innovative methods to help all students learn. The Western Addition high school was one of eight charter schools from across the country showcased in a report. Gateway was noted for its ‘excellence through personalized, student-centered learning.’ Last year, all of the school's 98 seniors passed the California High School Exit Exam and 96 percent went on to college.” San Francisco Chronicle (December 15, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S70514]

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EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT

From Cradle to Career: Connecting American Education From Birth to Adulthood: A Special State-Focused Supplement to Education Week's Quality Counts 2007. By the EPE Research Center. (The Center, Bethesda, Maryland) 2007. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.edweek.org/media/ew/qc/2007/17shr.ca.h26.pdf

[“California received mixed grades in preparing students for school and the work force. California ranked 34th in the 'chance-for-success' index that included 13 measures ranging from parental income and background, scholastic achievement, education and adult income. The state scored below the national average in several categories, including children with at least one parent working full-time and children whose parents speak fluent English. Experts said the study backs educators contentions that states need to focus on helping preschool students until they enter the work force.” San Gabriel Valley Tribune (January 4, 2007) 1.]

[Request #S70515]

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HIGHER EDUCATION

A Review of UC’s Long Range Development Planning Process. By Anthony Simbol and Minsun Park, Legislative Analyst’s Office. (The Office, Sacramento, California) January 2007. 24 p.

Full Text at: www.lao.ca.gov/2007/uc_lrdp/lrdp_011007.pdf

[“A state report found fault with how UC campuses plan for long-term expansion and how they work with surrounding communities to pay their share of growth impacts on such things as street, water and sewer systems. The Legislature should require UC to use systemwide enrollment projections to determine enrollment levels, instead of projections by campuses.... In addition, although campuses are supposed to negotiate payments with surrounding communities to compensate for growth impacts, no campus has reached such an agreement. “San Francisco Chronicle (January 12, 2007) 1.]

[Request #S70516]

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ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES

PARKS & RECREATION

Estimating the State Fuel Tax Paid on Gasoline Used in the Off-Highway Operation of Vehicles for Recreation: Survey Results. By Louis Browning, ICF International. (California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento, California) September 2006. 178 p.

Full Text at: www.ohv.parks.ca.gov/pages/1140/files/fuel%20tax%20survey%20report.pdf

[“A state study is recommending that the main funding source for the state parks department’s eight vehicular recreation areas be cut in half. About $56.8 million, or 83 percent, of the division’s total budget comes from fuel tax revenues. The study recommends cutting that gas tax allocation to about $27.1 million. Environmentalists seized upon the study, saying that it shows that park visitors not engaged in off-roading subsidize the activities of those using the parks. They are calling on lawmakers to raise entrance fees at the state’s eight OHV parks and increase registration fees for off-road vehicles in order to make up the gap.” San Luis Obispo Tribune (January 4, 2007) 1.]

[Request #S70517]

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WILDFIRES

“Contingent Pacific-Atlantic Ocean Influence on Multicentury Wildfire Synchrony Over Western North America.” By Thomas Kitzberger and others. IN: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, vol. 104, no. 2 (January 9, 2007) pp. 543-548.

[“Researchers predict a decades-long increase in widespread fires across the Western United States in the coming years, based on a new study that reviews the link between sea-surface temperatures in the North Atlantic Ocean and the ferocity of wildfire seasons in the West. Although scientists often cite the regional impacts of fluctuating Pacific Ocean temperatures -- the El Niño/La Niña effect -- a new look back across 500 years' worth of wildfire history shows a different trend: Warmer surface temperatures in the North Atlantic translated to worse wildfire seasons on the West Coast. The Atlantic Ocean is entering its next warm phase, scientists note. And global warming will exacerbate the trend.” San Jose Mercury News (December 26, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S70518]

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GENERAL GOVERNMENT

CAMPAIGN CONTRIBUTIONS

Citizens to Save California, et al. v. California Fair Political Practices Commission. California Court of Appeals, Third Appellate District. C049642. December 8, 2006. 29 p.

Full Text at: www.courtinfo.ca.gov/opinions/documents/C049642.PDF

[“A court upheld a ruling that allowed a campaign committee for Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger to raise unlimited amounts of money for his 2005 special election ballot measures. The ruling affirmed a lower court ruling that overturned a 2004 state Fair Political Practices Commission regulation that had imposed a $22,300-per-donor limit on contributions to candidate-controlled ballot measure committees. The rulings leave intact the state's contribution limits for politicians' election campaigns.” Sacramento Bee (December 9, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S70519]

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ELECTION REFORM

Enrique Sanchez, et al., v. City of Modesto, et al. California Court of Appeals, Fifth Appellate District. F048277. December 6, 2006. 35 p.

Full Text at: www.courtinfo.ca.gov/opinions/documents/F048277.PDF

[“A state appeals court has reinstated a 2002 California voting-rights law that allows minorities to sue cities, counties and school districts that elect their governing bodies at large, rather than by district, in areas where voting divides along racial lines. The ruling overturned a lower court decision that said the law violated white voters' rights because it allowed minority voters to overturn a local election system without having to prove that the system was put in place for racial reasons.” San Francisco Chronicle (December 8, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S70520]

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Statewide Survey: Election Reform Proposals. By Philip J. Trounstine, Survey and Policy Research Institute. (New America Foundation, Washington, DC) November 2006. 7 p.

Full Text at: www.newamerica.net/files/061211poll_crosstabs.pdf

[“Nearly three-quarters of California voters would like to see the governor and the Legislature create a citizen’s panel to explore ideas for making the state’s election process more fair and competitive.... Under the Citizens Assembly model, average California voters could recommend improvements to the state’s election process, possibly including an independent redistricting commission, open primaries, campaign finance reform or alternative election methods.” New America Foundation Press Release (December 13, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S70521]

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EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

Disadvantaged Populations: Actions Needed to Clarify Responsibilities and Increase Preparedness for Evacuations. By the U.S. Government Accountability Office. GAO-07-44. (The Office, Washington, DC) December 2006. 71 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/new.items/d0744.pdf

[“The experience of Hurricane Katrina illustrated that when state, local, and federal governments are not well prepared to evacuate transportation-disadvantaged populations during a disaster, thousands of people may not have the ability to evacuate on their own and may be left in extremely hazardous circumstances. While state and local governments have primary responsibility for planning, training, and conducting exercises for the evacuation of these populations, gaps in federal assistance have hindered the ability of many state and local governments to sufficiently prepare to address the complex challenges and barriers of evacuating transportation-disadvantaged populations.“]

[Request #S70522]

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GAMBLING

Colorado River Indian Tribes v. National Indian Gaming Commission, et al. U.S. Court of Appeals, District of Columbia Circuit. 05-5402. October 20, 2006. 11 p.

Full Text at: pacer.cadc.uscourts.gov/docs/common/opinions/200610/05-5402a.pdf

["A court may have jeopardized the future of five gaming deals that were cut between Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger and some of California's most successful casino-owning Indian tribes at the hectic end of last year's legislative session. The court ruling, which could have a profound impact in California, states the National Indian Gaming Commission does not have jurisdiction to regulate casinos that operate slot machines--including the more than 50 such casinos in California.... The governor's office said they will take the ruling into account and decide whether to reopen negotiations." Capitol Weekly (January 4, 2007) 1.]

[Request #S70523]

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PENSION FUNDS

An Analysis of Public Employee Retirement Systems in California. By the Center for Government Analysis. Commissioned by the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Foundation. (The Foundation, Los Angeles, California) January 2007. 159 p.

Full Text at: www.hjta.org/files/pdf/HJTA.Pension.pdf

["California taxpayers forked out $10.2 billion for public employee pensions in 2003-04 and are likely to face even greater liability in future years.... The study analyzed 130 public pension systems statewide and found taxpayer outlays doubled from 1997-98 to 2003-04. 'State and local governments are going to have to put more money into these systems, and that means less money for police, teachers, schools, roads, parks and libraries," said Steve Frates, president of the center.... But Keith Brainard, research director for the National Association of State Retirement Administrators, said the study conducted on behalf of the taxpayer advocate group relied on 'highly selective use of statistics to make its case.'" Contra Costa Times (January 17, 2007) F4.]

[Request #S70524]

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REVENUES & EXPENDITURES

Fiscal Disparities Across States: FY 2002. By Yesim Yilmaz, Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center. (The Center, Washington, DC) January 2007. 7 p.

Full Text at: www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/311403_States_Fiscal_Disparities.pdf

["The revenue capacity of each state includes tax capacity as well as potential nontax revenue from such sources as user charges, lotteries, income from sale of property, and interest income.... In terms of revenue capacity for 2002, Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, Alaska, and New Jersey are in the top five, while Mississippi, West Virginia, Arkansas, Alabama, and Oklahoma are at the bottom. [California ranked number 11.] "]

[Request #S70525]

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HEALTH

CHILDREN

SCHIP Reauthorization: Healthy Families Needs Sufficient Federal Funding. By David Carroll, California Budget Project. (The Project, Sacramento, California) December 2006. 9 p.

Full Text at: www.cbp.org/pdfs/2006/0612_bb_SCHIP.pdf

["California needs an additional $2 billion to $3 billion over the next five years in order to support the current Healthy Families Program. Even more funds would be needed if eligibility is expanded to cover additional children." Capitol Hill Bulletin (January 12, 2007) 2.]

[Request #S70526]

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FOOD SAFETY

“The US FDA and Animal Cloning: Risk and Regulatory Approach.” By Larisa Rudenko and John C. Mathesona. IN: Theriogenology, vol. 67, no. 1 (January 1, 2007) pp. 198-206.

[“A long-awaited study by federal scientists concludes that meat and milk from cloned animals and their offspring is safe to eat and should be allowed to enter the food supply without any special labeling. The finding is a strong signal that the Food and Drug Administration will endorse the use of cloning technology for cattle, goats and pigs when it publishes a key safety assessment intended to clear the way for formal approval of the products." Los Angeles Times (December 23, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S70527]

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PHYSICIANS

Physician Financial Incentives: Use of Quality Incentives Inches Up, but Productivity Still Dominates. By James D. Reschovsky and Jack Hadley, Center for Studying Health System Change. Issue Brief No. 108. (The Center, Washington, DC) January 2007. 4 p.

Full Text at: www.hschange.org/CONTENT/905/905.pdf

["The proportion of physicians in group practice whose compensation is based in part on quality measures increased from 17.6 percent in 2000-01 to 20.2 percent in 2004-05. Despite this small but statistically significant increase, quality-related physician compensation is much less common than financial incentives tied to physicians’ individual productivity, which has consistently affected 70 percent of physicians in non-solo practice since 1996-97. Examining the trend in quality-related physician compensation since 1996-97 suggests that quality incentives are most prevalent among primary care physicians and in large practices that receive a substantial share of revenue from capitated payments, or fixed per patient, per month payments."]

[Request #S70528]

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PRESCRIPTION DRUGS

Prescription Drugs: An Overview of Approaches to Negotiate Drug Prices Used by Other Countries and U.S. Private Payers and Federal Programs: Testimony. By John E. Dicken, U.S. Government Accountability Office. Presented to the Senate Committee on Finance. GAO-07-358T. (The Office, Washington, DC) January 11, 2007. 21 p.

Full Text at: frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/useftp.cgi?IPaddress=162.140.64.21&filename=d07358t.pdf&directory=/diskb/wais/data/gao

["Governments in other countries use a range of approaches to limit the amount they pay to acquire drugs: 1) Ceiling prices establish a maximum price manufacturers may charge for their products. Purchasers may sometimes negotiate more favorable prices directly with drug manufacturers; 2) Reference prices use local or international price comparisons of drugs classified in a group as therapeutically similar to determine a single or maximum price for all drugs in that group; and 3) Profit limits control how much profit a drug manufacturer may earn per product or within a specified period of time."]

[Request #S70529]

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RESEARCH

“Isolation of Amniotic Stem Cell Lines With Potential For Therapy.” By Paolo De Coppi and others. IN: Nature Biotechnology, vol. 25, no. 1. (January 2007) pp. 100-106.

[“Researchers have found that some stem cells in human amniotic fluid appear to have many of the key therapeutic benefits of embryonic stem cells while avoiding their knottiest ethical, medical and logistical drawbacks. The stem cells — easy to harvest from the fluid left over from amniocentesis tests given to many pregnant women — were used to create bone, heart muscle, blood vessels, fat, and nerve and liver tissues. The finding points to a promising avenue of research that sidesteps the hurdles facing embryonic stem cell research, which has been hampered by moral objections to the destruction of embryos that occurs when the cells are harvested.” Los Angeles Times (January 8, 2007) 1.]

[Request #S70530]

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HOUSING

AFFORDABLE HOUSING

Out of Reach, 2006. By Danilo Pelletiere and others, National Low-Income Housing Coalition. (The Coalition, Washington, DC) December 13, 2006. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.nlihc.org/oor/oor2006/

[“A California family needs to earn at least $22.86 an hour – working 40 hours a week, 52 weeks a year – to be able to afford rent and utilities in California’s housing market. The wage need is an increase of 37.4 percent since 2000. The situation is especially acute in the Central Valley. This year, California is the second most-expensive state in the nation for renters. Working at the minimum wage, a California family would need 3.4 individuals working full-time to afford a modest two-bedroom apartment. Central Valley Business Times (December 14, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S70531]

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HUMAN SERVICES

ADOLESCENTS

“Parental Expertise, Trustworthiness, and Accessibility: Parent-Adolescent Communication and Adolescent Risk Behavior.” By Vincent Guilamo-Ramos and others. IN: Journal of Marriage and Family, vol. 68, no. 5. (December 2006) pp. 1229-1246.

[“A communication framework of persuasion and attitude change was utilized to analyze parent-adolescent communication about adolescent risk behavior. Results showed weak correspondence between how expert, trustworthy, and accessible mothers thought they were on the one hand and how their sons and daughters characterized them on the other. All dimensions were related to how often adolescents said they talked with their mothers about a risk behavior, which, in turn, was predictive of lower levels of adolescent risk behavior.”]

[Request #S70532]

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CHILD CARE

Issues and Options: Developing Safety and Quality Ratings for Child Care. By Lauren Nackman and Melissa Eiler-White, Legislative Analyst’s Office. (The Office, Sacramento, California) January 2007. 28 p.

Full Text at: www.lao.ca.gov/2007/childcare/childcare.pdf

[“California licenses about 58,000 child care facilities serving 1.2 million children, but little information is readily available to parents about their safety and quality of care. To fix the problem, California should adopt a uniform ratings system. The state should help close the information gap, because public welfare is at stake and taxpayers have a large investment in the field, spending $3 billion annually in state and federal funds to provide subsidized care for close to 450,000 low-income children." San Francisco Chronicle (January 5, 2007) 1.]

[Request #S70533]

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CHILDREN

California Report Card, 2006-2007: The State of the State’s Children. By Children Now. (Children Now, Oakland, California) January 3, 2007. 40 p..

Full Text at: publications.childrennow.org/assets/pdf/policy/rc07/ca-rc-2007.pdf

[“The state has made progress in reducing drug and alcohol use, decreasing teen pregnancies and lowering mortality rates. However, the percentage of children covered by their parents' work-based health insurance is declining; while the rates of smoking, obesity, asthma and autism are on the rise.... The report also recommended voluntary, high-quality preschool for all 3 and 4-year-olds and a comprehensive overhaul of the state's public schools to ensure quality and equitable access.” Los Angeles Daily News (January 2, 2007) 1.]

[Request #S70534]

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HOMELESS

Homelessness Counts. By Mary Cunningham and Meghan Henry, National Alliance to End Homelessness. (The Alliance, Washington, DC) January 2007. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.endhomelessness.org/content/general/detail/1440

[“Nearly one-quarter of the nation's 744,000 homeless are right here in California and far fewer have shelter here than elsewhere in the nation. California had more homeless people than any other state in the nation, with an estimated 170,000 in 2005. A higher percentage of its residents were homeless than in most states, with 0.47 percent -- or nearly one in 200 people -- homeless. Only three states -- Nevada, Rhode Island, and Colorado -- had more.” Oakland Tribune (January 11, 2007) 1.]

[Request #S70535]

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PARENTS

The Bay Area Parent Poll. By the Survey and Policy Research Institute, San Jose State University. Prepared for the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health. (The Foundation, Palo Alto, California) January 11, 2007. 18 p.

Full Text at: www.kidsdata.org/parentpoll/parentpollreport-jan.pdf

["Four in 10 single mothers in the Bay Area said they do not have adequate income to provide for their child's basic needs. In the overall sample, 14 percent of Bay Area parents -- affecting approximately 195,000 children -- said they face difficulties providing for their child's food, clothing, shelter and other basic needs.... In addition to income, survey results were tabulated by other demographic factors, including county of residence, race/ethnicity, age, gender and marital status."]

[Request #S70536]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

HEALTH

HOSPITALS

Green Guide for Health Care. By Green Guide for Health Care Pilot Project. (The Project, Austin, Texas) January 2007.

["In the midst of the largest construction boom in decades, the health care market in 2006 visibly embraced green design, construction and operations.... While these projects confronted many of the barriers that challenged health care projects in the past, they also revealed a series of factors that, together, helped tip the balance in favor of greening health care facilities across the country and internationally." Publisher's Announcement (January 2007) 1.]

[Request #S70537]

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