Subject: Studies in the News 06-52 (December 23, 2006)


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News


California -- One Hundred and Fifty Years Ago

1856 - "Nearly all the flour and grain used in California at this period was imported, although most ranches had small patches of corn, beans, and wheat for home consumption.... The best flour came from San Bernardino and was preferred to that from Chile.... Since 1853, more grain, principally barley, was raised in the little valley of Viejas than in all the rest of the country. It was hauled in to Old Town San Diego, in Mexican carts, over a wild, broken country, without roads a great part of the way. In 1856, flour was worth $6 per cwt. at the mill, wheat 22½ cents per pound, barley 4 cents per pound, and hay $35 per ton. "  http://sandiegohistory.org/books/smythe/2-11.htm  

1856 - "California's modern wine industry is born when the state legislature commissioned Count Agoston Haraszthy to select cuttings of European wine grapes to improve the quality of the local vineyards. In 1856, a ship sailed through the Golden Gate with thousands of cuttings of Europe's choicest vines -- the Flame Tokay, Zinfandel, Muscat of Alexandria, Seedless Sultana, Black Morocco -- all selected by Haraszthy. That Zinfandel grape is now the most planted grape in California. In 1857 his attention was called to the vineyard of General Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo at Sonoma. At the time Haraszthy made his first appearance at Sonoma in 1857, Vallejo was the leading vintner. With his first glimpse of Sonoma Valley and its rich soil, he bought a parcel of sixteen acres called Vineyard Farm which had been planted in 1834 by Salvadore Vallejo. Haraszthy then began transporting cuttings to Sonoma. By the end of 1857 he had more than tripled the total grape acreage of Sonoma Valley. In that single year he had planted 80,000 vines on about 118 acres. "   http://www.maritimeheritage.org/vips/haraszthy.ht  

Contents This Week

Introductory Material CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT
   Batterer intervention programs
   LAPD gets mixed progress report
   Health of prisons a work in progress
   U.S. prison population increases
CULTURE AND SOCIETY
   Panel urges help for men of color
   Challenges to the arts
ECONOMY
   UCLA economic forecast
   Few women in boardrooms
   Microenterprise development in the U.S.
   State of Southern California region
EDUCATION
   Addressing the achievement gap
   Audit faults teacher plan
   Nation's report card in science
EMPLOYMENT
   Impact of immigrant entrepreneurs
   Workforce preparation and economic needs
   Workforce development and higher education
ENERGY
   Electrical utility metering
   Applying psychology to electricity pricing
ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES
   Pollution from construction equipment
   Global warming, local initiatives
   Land trusts increase
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
   Race horses fail drug tests
   Uses and effects of eminent domain
   Legislature's grade on racial equity
   State process for hiring IT workers
HEALTH
   Attitudes toward end-of-life care
   State health rankings
   Immigrants and the cost of medical care
   HMOs lose cost advantage
HOUSING
   Federal housing programs insufficient
HUMAN SERVICES
   Changing adoption patterns
   Data on homeless schoolchildren
   Foundation giving in California
   Work participation in CalWORKS
STUDIES TO COME
   Safety belts on school buses
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News is a very current compilation of items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau to supplement the public policy debate in California’s Capitol. To help share the latest information with state policymakers, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library’s website. This week's list of current articles in various public policy areas is presented below.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • California State Employees may contact the State Information & Reference Center (916-654-0206; cslsirc@library.ca.gov) with the SITN issue number and the item number [S#].

  • All other interested individuals should contact their local library - the items may be available there, or may be borrowed by your local library on your behalf.

The following studies are currently on hand:

CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

Batterer Intervention Programs: County Probation Department Could Improve their Compliance with State Law, But Progress in Batterer Accountability Also Depends on the Courts. By the California State Auditor, Bureau of State Audits. (The Bureau, Sacramento, California) November 2006. 85 p.

Full Text at: www.bsa.ca.gov/pdfs/reports/2005-130.pdf

["Only about half of domestic abusers in California complete a mandatory year-long intervention program after being sentenced to probation. Many batterers rack up repeated absences from the program or simply fail to enroll in the first place. And when that happens, probation departments and courts often refer the abusers back to the programs without penalty. The lack of compliance and a dearth of monitoring make it hard to gauge whether the programs are helping reduce domestic violence." Sacramento Bee (November 22, 2006) A4.]

[Request #S65201]

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LOS ANGELES POLICE DEPARTMENT

Report of the Independent Monitor of the Los Angeles Police Department: Report for the Quarter Ending September 30, 2006. By the Office of the Independent Monitor of the Los Angeles Police Department. (The Department, Los Angeles, California) November 15, 2006. 50 p.

Full Text at: www.lapdonline.org/assets/pdf/LAPD_Q21_Final_Report_11-15-2006.pdf

[“The Los Angeles Police Department continues in its failure to comply with some requirements of a federal consent decree for handling investigations into the use of force. The monitor found that the LAPD had failed to comply with requirements that managers consider an officer's work history in recommending discipline for excessive force and analyze whether supervisors' ‘response to the incident … was appropriate.’ The report also found that the LAPD fell short in a requirement that officers involved in fatal or near-fatal use of force be referred to department psychologists for evaluation.” Los Angeles Times (November 16, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S65202]

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PRISONS

Marciano Plata, et al. vs. Arnold Schwarzenegger, et al. U.S. District Court, Northern District of California. C01-1351-T.E.H. Receiver’s Third Bi-Monthly Report. December 5, 2006. 89 p.

Full Text at: extras.mnginteractive.com/live/media/site181/2006/1206/20061206_025448_rep2.pdf

[“Changes in nursing staff and pharmacy operations will save California millions on prison health care, but state officials and labor unions still must do more to reform the shoddy system. The receiver reported that state taxpayers will save about $39 million in the first year alone by converting the prisons' medical technical assistants — a hybrid nurse/peace officer position — to licensed vocational nurses, who'll get non-peace officer pay and benefits.... While the governor shows ‘signs of cooperation and collaboration,’ there also are ‘foreboding signs of resistance and abstinence from major agencies such as the State Personnel Board as well as individuals within various agencies of state government.’ " Oakland Tribune (December 5, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S65203]

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Prisoners in 2005. By Paige M. Harrison, and Allen J. Beck, Bureau of Justice Statistics, U.S. Department of Justice (The Bureau, Washington, DC) November 2006. 13 p.

Full Text at: www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/pub/pdf/p05.pdf

[“About 7 million adults -- accounting for 3% of the U.S. population -- were incarcerated, on probation or on parole at the end of 2005. Of that total, 2.2 million individuals were in federal and state prisons or local jails, 4.1 million were on probation and more than 784,000 were on parole. The total number of inmates rose 35% from 1995 to 2005, but their racial composition was little changed. In 2005, blacks made up 40% of inmates, whites 35% and Latinos 20% -- small changes from a decade earlier. Although men were far more likely than women to be jailed or imprisoned, the number of women behind bars increased at a faster rate last year -- up 2.6%, compared with a 1.9% increase for men.” Los Angeles Times (December 1, 2006) A24.]

[Request #S65204]

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CULTURE AND SOCIETY

AFRICAN AMERICANS

A Way Out: Creating Partners for Our Nation’s Prosperity By Expanding Life Paths of Young Men of Color: Final Report. By the Dellums Commission. (Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, Washington, DC) 2006. 38 p.

Full Text at: www.jointcenter.org/publications1/publication-PDFs/Dellums%20PDFs/FinalReport.pdf

[“A national study found that 25 years of get-tough policies have failed young men of color and that dramatic changes in government approaches are essential. The study identifies as the roots of the problem, America's deindustrialization, de-unionization, and subsequent decline in jobs and wages for working-class families; ineffective drug laws; educational inequities; lack of social and legal services; and discriminatory housing policies. The report presents as solutions: broadening access to health and wellness programs in schools, having states extend health care to all children under 18; treating antisocial behavior outside of juvenile halls using mental health courts; and tapping students of color for ideas about how to reduce dropout rates.” San Francisco Chronicle (November 14, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S65205]

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Critical Issues Facing the Arts in California. By AEA Consulting and the James Irvine Foundation. (The Foundation, San Francisco, California) 2006. 35 p.

Full Text at: www.irvine.org/assets/pdf/pubs/arts/Critical_Issues_Arts.pdf

["This working paper identifies the major challenges facing the arts and cultural sector in California. Based on interviews with arts leaders and a review of the relevant literature, the paper describes five key themes that, if not addressed, may threaten the health and well-being of the sector going forward. The themes are: Access, Cultural Policy, Arts Education, Nonprofit Business Model, and Preparing the Next Generation of Artists and Arts Managers."]

[Request #S65206]

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ECONOMY

CALIFORNIA

The UCLA Forecast for the Nation and California. By the UCLA Anderson Forecasting Project, Anderson Graduate School of Management. (The School, Los Angeles, California) December 2006. Various pagings.

[“Two potential areas of trouble are the real estate sector's impact on retail trade and California's budget situation. Since October 2005, retail trade lost 9,000 jobs, most of them from department stores. The other issue is the housing slowdown impact on state revenues and a deficit-financing scheme passed in 2004. Revenues surged during the boom, with property tax revenues increasing 58 percent between 2001 and this year. But the weakness that may surface in these two areas could be offset by ‘savior sectors,’ professional business services and leisure and hospitality. Both were critical components of the recovery from the 2001 recession and have been the top two generators since October 2003.” Los Angeles Daily News (December 7, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S65208]

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CORPORATIONS

UC Davis Study of California Women Business Leaders: A Census of Women Directors and Executive Officers. By Katrina Ellis, UC Davis Center for Women and Leadership. (The Center, Davis, California) 2006. 49 p.

Full Text at: tinyurl.com/ykvz3f

[“A woman's voice is still hard to find in boardrooms at California's largest companies. Roughly half of the state's top 400 public companies have no female directors, and women hold just 8.8 percent of the 3,245 board seats overall. Some of the findings: only 11 of the 400 companies have female chief executive officers; and the retail industry has the highest percentage of directors, 12.8 percent, while telecommunications has the lowest, 3.2 percent.... With corporate finances coming under increased scrutiny by regulators, more companies are inviting female chief financial officers to join their boards.” Sacramento Bee (November 17, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S65207]

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SMALL BUSINESS

"Microenterprise Development in the United States: Current Challenges and New Directions." By Lisa J. Servon. IN: Economic Development Quarterly, vol. 20, no. 4. (November 2006) pp. 351-367.

["U.S. microenterprise programs provide business training, small amounts of credit ($35,000 or less), or both to businesses with five or fewer employees. As the microenterprise field nears the end of its second decade in the United States, experts and practitioners agree that the field is in a difficult place; there appears to be relatively widespread agreement on the nature of the problems, which include a lack of standardized data, decreasing funding from some key sectors, increased competition, and difficulty in reaching the target market.... Strategies to address these challenges fall into three broad categories: restructuring, innovation, and accreditation and standardization."]

[Request #S65209]

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SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

The State of the Region 2006: Measuring Regional Progress . By Ping Chang, Southern California Association of Governments. (The Association, Los Angeles, California) December 2006.

["During 2005, the region experienced mixed performance in most areas including employment, income, and air quality. For example, with respect to job market performance, benefits from the job base expansion and unemployment rate reductions were offset by declining job quality measured in average payroll per job. In addition, slight improvements in per capita income were tempered by the slight decline in the median household income. In 2005, steep increases in energy prices and the resulting higher cost of living limited economic growth, but also helped to stabilize the impacts of growth (e.g. traffic congestion and air pollution)."]

Report. 170 p.
http://www.scag.ca.gov/publications/pdf/2006/SOTR06/SOTR06_FullReport_lores.pdf

Executive Summary. 12 p.
http://www.scag.ca.gov/publications/pdf/2006/SOTR06/SOTR06_ExecSum.pdf

[Request #S65210]

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EDUCATION

ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

Snapshots of Reform: District Efforts to Raise Student Achievement Across Diverse Communities in California. By Elisabeth L. Woody and others, Policy Analysis for California, University of California, Berkeley. (The University, Berkeley, California) 2006. 43 p.

Full Text at: pace.berkeley.edu/reports/WP06-2_Snapshots_of_Reform_OCT06.pdf

["In California the inequities in student achievement are real and persistent, and are consistent across grades and across socioeconomic levels.... While student achievement within all subgroups has improved over the last five years, the gaps between these groups remain virtually unchanged.... In response to these disturbing trends, we find that some school districts in California are showing success in closing achievement gaps. This report spotlights the efforts of three districts to address inequities in achievement, and provides information about a variety of strategies that districts have found to be effective in raising achievement for diverse populations of students."]

[Request #S65211]

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AUDITS AND INVESTIGATIONS

Department of Education: Its Mathematics and Reading Professional Development Program Has Trained Fewer Teachers than Originally Expected. By the California State Auditor, Bureau of State Audits. (The Bureau, Sacramento, California) November 2006. 67 p.

Full Text at: www.bsa.ca.gov/pdfs/reports/2005-133.pdf

[“A state audit, based on a survey of 100 school districts, estimates that only 7,230 of the state's 252,000 public school math and reading instructors have completed a voluntary 120-hour training program. The report blames lawmakers for cutting $98 million out of the $143 million appropriated for the program over its first two years.... The audit also faults the state Department of Education for failing to effectively promote the initiative and criticizes both teachers and school districts as lacking motivation to take advantage of the training program.” Sacramento Bee (December 1, 2006) A4.]

[Request #S65212]

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NATIONAL STANDARDS

The Nation's Report Card: Science 2005; The Trial Urban District Assessment of Grades 4 and 8. By the National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education. (The Center, Washington, DC) November 2006. 51 p.

Full Text at: nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/pdf/dst2005/2007453.pdf

[“Science scores of Los Angeles students rank at or near the bottom of those in 10 urban centers.... Officials cited high poverty rates and a large number of English learners as factors in the Los Angeles rankings. Los Angeles officials said the government assessment did not strictly match California science standards, but nevertheless said the results should serve as a wake-up call.” Los Angeles Times (November 16, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S65213]

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EMPLOYMENT

SKILLED WORK FORCE

American Made: The Impact of Immigrant Entrepreneurs and Professionals on U.S. Competitiveness. By Stuart Anderson, National Foundation for American Policy, and Michaela Platzer, Content First, LLC. (National Venture Capital Association, Arlington, Virginia) 2006. 40 p.

Full Text at: www.nvca.org/pdf/AmericanMade_study.pdf

[“A study concludes that immigrants had a hand in starting 1 in 5 venture-backed public companies in the United States during the past 15 years. These companies have created thousands of jobs and have a combined market capitalization of $500 billion. Companies say they cannot find enough U.S.-born engineers, computer scientists and other skilled professionals to fill openings.” San Francisco Chronicle (November 15, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S65232]

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WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

Workforce Preparation: Aligning State Systems and Policies for Individual and Regional Prosperity. By Christopher Mazzeo and others, Workforce Strategy Center. (The Center, Brooklyn, New York) December 2006. 45 p.

Full Text at: www.workforcestrategy.org/publications/WSC_workingtogether_12.1.06_3.pdf

["Despite evidence that both individuals and regions benefit economically when state systems effectively prepare skilled workers to participate in the knowledge economy, policymakers often come up short in optimizing the performance of their public systems of education and training. This paper details how policymakers can take immediate action to align policies and improve these systems, with numerous examples of best practices in numerous states. These cutting edge states have all learned that low-skill and low-wage workers are an important untapped potential resource for regional economic growth, and that enhancing the skills and employment prospects of these workers can and will benefit a state’s overall economy."]

[Request #S65233]

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The Nexus Between Postsecondary Education and Workforce Development: A Workforce and Employer Perspective. By the California Postsecondary Education Commission. (The Comission, Sacramento, California) December 2006. 16 p.

Full Text at: www.cpec.ca.gov/completereports/2006reports/06-19.pdf

["There is a growing gap between how well the State prepares and equips California’s workforce and what is demanded for preeminence in a highly dynamic, technology advanced, and globally-structured 21st century economy. Policymakers and industry leaders concerned with California’s economic future know a skills and knowledge gap exists, and are increasingly alarmed that it threatens to erode our ability to sustain robust economic success and maintain California’s high quality of life."]

[Request #S65234]

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ENERGY

RENEWABLE ENERGY

Freeing the Grid: How Effective State Net Metering Laws Can Revolutionize U.S. Energy Policy. By the Network for New Energy Choices. (The Network, New York, New York) November 2006. 114 p.

Full Text at: www.newenergychoices.org/uploads/netMetering.pdf

["The report identifies how state net-metering programs -- which are designed to help homeowners and small businesses generate their own renewable energy and sell the excess back to the central transmission grid -- hold the key to solving America's energy challenges by comparing the regulations from 34 states.... Congress mandated in the 2005 Energy Bill that every state consider adopting or expanding net metering programs by the end of 2007." Inside Renewable Energy (November 21, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S65214]

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UTILITIES

Applying Psychology to Economic Policy Design: Using Incentive Preserving Rebates to Increase Acceptance of Critical Peak Electricity Pricing. By Robert Letzler, University of California, Berkeley. (Center for the Study of Energy Markets, Berkeley, California) December 2006. 62 p.

Full Text at: www.ucei.berkeley.edu/PDF/csemwp162.pdf

["Letzler's solution is to reverse the psychology the conservation programs employ. He wants to change a penalty into a reward. Instead of reducing rates as low as possible at times of low demand, and raising them to super-high levels at times when demand is high, Letzler proposes to lower the off-peak rates significantly but still include a small surcharge in the monthly bill. This extra money collected would be placed into an account that would be under each consumer's control. During times of high demand, consumers would have the right to buy a certain amount of peak power that they could pay for out of their reserve accounts -- or conserve and earn a rebate." Sacramento Bee (December 12, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S65215]

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ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES

AIR POLLUTION

Digging Up Trouble: The Health Risks of Construction Pollution in California. By Don Anair, Union of Concerned Scientists. (The Union, Cambridge, Massachusetts) November 2006. 38 p.

Full Text at: www.ucsusa.org/assets/documents/clean_vehicles/Digging-up-Trouble.pdf

["An environmental group concluded that at least 1,100 premature deaths and half a million work and school absences in 2005 were caused by people breathing emissions from older tractors, bulldozers and other diesel equipment — at an estimated public health cost of $9.1 billion. The Los Angeles air basin fared the worst among 15 statewide, with 731 estimated premature deaths, both in the city and in suburban areas such as Santa Clarita, Temecula and Murietta, where there has been large-scale construction to accommodate fast-growing populations. Heavily populated and fast-growing parts of the San Francisco Bay Area, San Diego and the San Joaquin and northern Sacramento valleys also experienced high health costs from construction equipment." Los Angeles Times (December 6, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S65216]

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GLOBAL WARMING

An Emergency Ordinance … [regarding] A Climate Action Plan Tax. Ordinance No. 7483. By the City Council, City of Boulder, Colorado (The Council, Boulder, Colorado) 2006. 5p.

[“Frustrated with the federal response to global warming, hundreds of cities, suburbs and rural communities across the nation have taken bold steps to slash their energy consumption and reduce emissions of the pollutants that cause climate change. [Boulder, Colorado] recently adopted the nation's first 'climate tax' -- an extra fee for electricity use, with all proceeds going to fight global warming. The tax, which will cost the average homeowner less than $2 a month, won approval in November from 59% of voters. City officials will use the money for conservation education, including subsidized energy audits.” Los Angeles Times (December 10, 2006) 1.]

Ordinance. 5 p.
http://www.bouldercolorado.gov/files/Environmental%20Affairs/climate%20and%20energy/o-7483-cap_tax_8_29_06_a_final.lza.pdf

Climate Action Plan. 72 p.
http://www.bouldercolorado.gov/files/Environmental%20Affairs/climate%20and%20energy/cap_final_25sept06.pdf

[Request #S65217]

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LAND USE

National Land Trust Census Report: 2005. By Rob Aldrich and others, Land Trust Alliance. (The Alliance, Washington, DC) November 2006. 22 p.

Full Text at: www.lta.org/census/2005_report.pdf

["The number of land trusts in California increased by 50% in the last five years, reflecting dramatic growth in private conservation efforts across the country. The report found that nationally, land protected by private, nonprofit trusts and conservation groups grew by 54%, or 13 million acres, between 2000 and 2005. Driving the trend, he and others said, is the passage of conservation bond funds, federal tax incentives and the desire to preserve open space as development pushes into new areas.... By far the largest increase was in acreage placed under easements, a trend expected to continue." Los Angeles Times (December 1, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S65218]

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GENERAL GOVERNMENT

GAMBLING

"Bad Bets: On a Tainted Track." By Scott M. Reid and others. IN: Orange County Register (December 10, 2006) 2A.

Full Text at: www.ocregister.com/ocregister/news/abox/article_1353904.php

["While drug violations have dropped significantly in other major racing states, the number of failed tests in California has doubled since 2000.... Drug violations that would result in suspensions or lost purses in other major racing states lead to fines in California that amount to little more than a slap on the wrist. Trainers whose horses fail drug tests routinely bargain down penalties and keep their purses.... Racing veterans say California's horse-racing board, made up of appointed insiders with fortunes tied to the industry, is more concerned with protecting the state's image than cleaning up its drug problem."]

[Request #S65219]

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LAND USE

Eminent Domain: Information about Its Uses and Effect on Property Owners and Communities Is Limited. By the U.S. Government Accountability Office. GAO-07-28. (The Office, Washington, DC) November 2006. 58 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/new.items/d0728.pdf

["Congress mandated that GAO conduct a nationwide study on the use of eminent domain by state and local governments. This report provides information on 1) the purposes for and extent to which eminent domain can be and has been used; 2) the process states and select localities across the country use to acquire land, including by eminent domain; 3) how the use of eminent domain has affected individuals and communities in select localities; and 4) the changes state legislatures made to laws governing the use of eminent domain from June 2005 through July 2006."]

[Request #S65220]

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LEGISLATURE

Facing Race: 2006 Legislative Report Card on Racial Equity: California. By Menachem Krajcer and Tammy Johnson, Applied Research Center. (The Center, Oakland, California) 2006. 57 p.

Full Text at: www.arc.org/downloads/Facing_Race_CA.pdf

[“A racial justice advocacy group released a scorecard assessing how California's governor and Legislature have handled bills it says affected racial inequities -- or might have if they'd been signed into law. The report examined an eclectic collection of bills that addressed the minimum wage, the creation of a single-payer health care system and other issues in education, health care and civil rights. Legislators' support of the bills identified by the group mirrored the proportion of non-white residents in their districts, according to the report.” San Francisco Chronicle (November 14, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S65221]

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STATE EMPLOYEES

The State's Information Technology Hiring Process: Suggested Reforms. By Alicia Bugarin, California Research Bureau, California State Library. CRB 06-011 (The Bureau, Sacramento, California) November 2006. 29 p.

Full Text at: www.library.ca.gov/crb/06/11/06-011.pdf

["Our review finds that recruitment practices, examination and hiring processes and inadequate training continue to hamper the state’s hiring of well-qualified IT workers. The same issues also affect other state job classifications. Improving personnel practices is critical to enhancing state government productivity and operations.... This report provides a summary of recommendations, considers the progress made, and discusses the remaining issues that must be addressed if the state is to effectively maintain a qualified IT workforce in the 21st century."]

[Request #S65222]

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HEALTH

DYING

Attitudes Towards End-of-Life Care in California. By the California Healthcare Foundation and Lake Research Partners. (The Foundation, Oakland, California) November 2006. 100 p.

Full Text at: www.chcf.org/documents/chronicdisease/EOLSurvey.pdf

[“Nearly 70 percent of Californians have not put their end-of-life decisions in writing, and only half have discussed those wishes with their loved ones, according to a survey. Even among the eldest surveyed, those over 75 years old, 33 percent did not have their end-of-life wishes in writing.... While 87 percent of whites surveyed said they would not want to be kept alive if they were in a persistent coma with no hope for significant recovery, 72 percent of African Americans and 70 percent of Latinos said they felt that way. African Americans were most concerned about finding health providers who respect their cultural beliefs about death and dying, at 62 percent. Thirty-five percent of Latinos and 30 percent of whites surveyed expressed those concerns." Oakland Tribune (November 16, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S65223]

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HEALTH CARE

America's Health Rankings: A Call to Action for People and Their Communities. By the United Health Foundation. (The Foundation, Minnetonka, Minnesota) 2006. 134 p.

Full Text at: www.unitedhealthfoundation.org/ahr2006/media2006/shrmediakit/2006ahr.pdf

["Despite its image as the land of sunshine and tofu, California ranks 23rd in the nation for healthy living, down a notch from last year. The good news: The Golden State has among the lowest rates of smoking, infant mortality and cancer deaths. The bad news: California has a relatively low rate of immunization coverage, high rates of infectious diseases and a high proportion of residents lacking health insurance. And in a marked finding, nearly one in four Californians is obese, up from one in 10 in 1990." Daily News of Los Angeles (December 6, 2006) N1.]

[Request #S65224]

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IMMIGRATION & IMMIGRANTS

"Immigrants and the Cost Of Medical Care." By Dana P. Goldman and others. IN: Health Affairs, vol. 25 no. 6. (2006) pp. 1700-1711.

["Healthcare for illegal immigrants between the ages of 18 and 64 cost American taxpayers $1.1 billion in 2000 — or about $11 per household. The Rand study, which surveyed Los Angeles County residents about their use of healthcare services and then used national estimates on cost to put a price tag on the care, found that nearly 22% of illegal immigrants have health insurance, which covered about $362 million in costs in 2000. The immigrants themselves paid $321 million out of pocket." Los Angles Times (November 15, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S65225]

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INSURANCE

California Employer Health Benefits Survey. By the California HealthCare Foundation. (The Foundation, Oakland, California) November 2006. 44 p.

Full Text at: www.chcf.org/documents/insurance/EmployerBenefitsSurvey06.pdf

[“After years of consistently paying less than HMO members in other states, California consumers in employer-sponsored HMO plans now pay about the same as the national average — about $340 a month for single coverage. HMOs, also known as managed care, continue to be much cheaper compared with other health plans in the state, on average more than $1,000 less per year. In the rest of the country, HMO premiums cost about the same as other health plans. But HMOs' price advantage in California is due more to the rapid rise in costs of other plans than managed care's ability to keep premiums down, and that could be a sign of trouble.” Los Angeles Times (November 30, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S65226]

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HOUSING

FEDERAL HOUSING PROGRAMS

Without Housing: Decades of Federal Housing Cutbacks, Massive Homelessness and Policy Failures. By the Western Regional Advocacy Project. (The Project, San Francisco, California) November 2006. 88 p.

Full Text at: www.wraphome.org/wh_press_kit/Without_Housing_20061114.pdf

["The report contends that the housing crisis for poor families and individuals that started in the 1980s was created by dramatic federal spending cuts. The report notes that the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development budget, which pays for public housing, housing vouchers and related programs, shrank 65 percent between 1978 and 2006. ‘Our conclusion is that the national crisis of mass homelessness cannot and will not be resolved without a recommitment by the federal government to fully fund legitimate housing programs.’" San Francisco Chronicle (November 16, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S65227]

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HUMAN SERVICES

ADOPTION

Safeguarding the Rights and Well-Being of Birthparents in the Adoption Process. By Susan Livingston Smith, Evan B. Donald Adoption Institute (The Institute, New York, New York) November 2006. 68 p.

Full Text at: www.adoptioninstitute.org/publications/2006_11_Birthparent_Study_All.pdf

["A landmark study on adoption offers a surprising new portrayal of a more mature woman whose interests deserve greater protection. Most birth mothers have graduated from high school, many have college educations, and some may be in graduate school. A few are married. The report calls for new laws to guarantee birth parents the ability to make uncoerced decisions and to permit them contact with their children after adoptions. Only about 25 percent of birth mothers are under age 20 and an estimated 90 percent meet the adoptive parents. ‘Contrary to the stereotypes that have been created about them, almost no women choosing adoption today seek anonymity.’" Philadelphia Inquirer (November 19, 2006) A2.]

[Request #S65228]

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HOMELESS

Homeless Children in California Public Schools, 2005-2006. By the California Senate Office of Research, and the Senate Office of Demographics. (The Offices, Sacramento, California) October 2006. 39 p.

[“Nearly 95,000 schoolchildren were homeless during some part of the 2005-2006 school year. The numbers do not include children who are not enrolled in public school or children of whom districts are simply unaware. Of the 94,978 schoolchildren reported to have been homeless last year, 60,869 lived doubled or tripled up with other families, 17,947 slept in shelters or motels and 2,662 slept in cars or outdoors. The remaining 13,500 slept in places unknown to the schools. About two-thirds of homeless students were in kindergarten through sixth grade." Sacramento Bee (October 31, 2006) B1.]

Memorandum. 5 p.
memorandum

Data. 39 p.
data

[Request #S65229]

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NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

Foundation Giving in California: A Snapshot of Overall Giving, Asset Distribution, and Regional Disparities Among Private and Community Foundations. By Putnam Community Investment Consulting. (James Irvine Foundation, San Francisco, California) November 2006. 34 p.

Full Text at: www.irvine.org/assets/pdf/pubs/philanthropy/Foundation_Giving_in_California.pdf

[“Private foundations are spending the most in the Bay Area and the least in the Central Valley and Inland Empire. Most of the money that foundations rely on comes from individual donors. That's where the problem lies for struggling areas such as the San Joaquin Valley. The study points out the enormous disparity among regions and spurs donors to think outside their counties about what other poor communities need.” San Francisco Chronicle November 16, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S65230]

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TEMPORARY ASSISTANCE FOR NEEDY FAMILIES

Patterns of Work Participation in CalWORKS. By Caroline Danielson, Public Policy Institute of California. (The Institute, San Francisco, California) December 12, 2006. 50 p.

Full Text at: www.ppic.org/content/pubs/op/OP_1206CDOP.pdf

["The legislation that created the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families required states to engage 50 percent of most adults receiving cash assistance in work or related activities, or face fiscal penalties.... In 2004 California’s work participation rate among single parents was an estimated 26.4 percentage points below 50 percent, and the inclusion of sanctioned cases would likely have lowered it by 1 to 2 percentage points.... Program administrators may want to consider those newly required to participate, those exempted, those with some hours of participation, and those contributing no hours and who are not exempted separately as they develop strategies to expand work participation among CalWORKs adults."]

[Request #S65231]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

HEALTH

INJURY PREVENTION

"School Bus–Related Injuries Among Children and Teenagers in the United States, 2001-2003." By Jennifer McGeehan and others. IN: Pediatrics, vol. 118, no. 5. (November 2006) pp. 1978-1984.

["New national data show school-bus-related accidents send 17,000 children to emergency rooms each year, more than double the number in previous estimates that included only crashes. Nearly one-fourth of the accidents occur when children are boarding or leaving school buses. Slips and falls on buses, getting jostled when buses stop or turn suddenly, and injuries from roughhousing are among other ways children get hurt on school.... The researchers said the results provided a strong argument for requiring safety belts on school buses. " Washington Post (November 6, 2006) A4.]

[Request #S65235]

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