Subject: Studies in the News 06-33 (July 25, 2006)


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News


California -- One Hundred and Fifty Years Ago

July 1856 - "A drawing by Thomas Ayres provided the American public with its first glimpse of Yosemite Falls. The High Falls and other Ayres drawings were used in the first issue of Hutchings' California Magazine in July 1856. Nine years later, in 1864, the Federal Government granted Yosemite Valley and the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias to the State of California as an inalienable public trust. It was established as a national park in 1890 and the State returned the lands to the Federal Government in 1906. http://www.cr.nps.gov/museum/centennial/treasures/Yose.htm "    

1856 - "Commercialism first came to Yosemite in 1856. In that year Milton and Houston Mann brought 42 tourists to see the Valley. They charged $2.00 per person -- a large sum in those days -- but they were later bought out by Mariposa County, and the path became free…. A simple structure, later called the Lower Hotel, was being completed as the first tourists rode down the Mann's still-fresh trail into Yosemite Valley. Other trails and hotels quickly followed and tourism increased. Galen Clark, who had just built a cabin in today's Wawona area would tend to the needs of the tourists. He did this with kindness, and his spirit of devotion to Yosemite profoundly imbued travelers with a similar reverence for this mountain landscape. http://gorp.away.com/gorp/publishers/wildernesspress/yosemite/hik_yosem43.htm "   http://elane.stanford.edu/wilson/Text/2e.html  

Contents This Week

Introductory Material CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT
   Failures of the correctional system
   Groups sue over Prop 36 changes
   Violence prevention strategies
   Invest in kids to fight crime
CULTURE AND SOCIETY
   Hispanic attitudes toward learning English
DEMOGRAPHY
   Decline of middle-income neighborhoods
ECONOMY
   Financial access for immigrants
   Policy implications of Internet gambling
   Los Angeles regional statistics
EDUCATION
   Achievement gap reforms
   Understanding high school graduation rates
   Preparing youth with disabilities
EMPLOYMENT
   Short-term unauthorized workers
   Farm labor mediation law upheld
   Reforming public employee retirement system
ENERGY
   Developing geothermal energy
   States' renewable energy standards
ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES
   Earthquake potential on San Andreas fault
   More thirsty lawns
   Climate change effect on California water
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
   Vermont campaign finance limits struck down
   Nation's evolving election system
   State implementation of the Real ID Act
   Latino elected officials in the United States
   Sharing tax information with cities
   Trends transforming government
HEALTH
   Improving children's health
   Emergency medical services
   Emergency room use across communities
   Health insurance coverage gap
   Settlement of Mexican candy case
HOUSING
   Mobile home rent control
HUMAN SERVICES
   New TANF regulations
   Implementing TANF changes
TRANSPORTATION
   Protecting the nation's seaports
   Using toll roads for increased access
STUDIES TO COME
   Guide to school reform
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News is a very current compilation of items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau to supplement the public policy debate in California’s Capitol. To help share the latest information with state policymakers, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library’s website. This week's list of current articles in various public policy areas is presented below.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • California State Employees may contact the State Information & Reference Center (916-654-0206; cslsirc@library.ca.gov) with the SITN issue number and the item number [S#].

  • All other interested individuals should contact their local library - the items may be available there, or may be borrowed by your local library on your behalf.

The following studies are currently on hand:

CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT

CORRECTIONS

Confronting Confinement. By John Gibbons and Nicholas Katzenbach, Commission on Safety and Abuse in America's Prisons. (The Commission, Washington, DC) June 2006.

["Americans spend $60 billion a year to imprison 2.2 million people but receive a dismal return on the investment. The report says legislators have passed get-tough laws that have packed the nation's jails and prisons to overflowing with convicts, most of them poor and uneducated. However, politicians have done little to help inmates emerge as better citizens upon release. The consequences of that failure include financial strain on states, public health threats from parolees with communicable diseases, and a cycle of crime and victimization driven by a recidivism rate of more than 60%." Los Angeles Times (June 8, 2006) A7.]

Report. 126 p.
http://www.prisoncommission.org/pdfs/Confronting_Confinement.pdf

Summary. 7 p.
http://www.prisoncommission.org/pdfs/prison_commission_summary.pdf

[Request #S63301]

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DRUG PROSECUTION

Cliff Gardner, et al. v. Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governor of California, et al. Alameda County Superior Court. Complaint for Injunctive and Declaratory Relief. July 12, 2006. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.drugpolicy.org/docUploads/Complaint_Exhibits_Prop36Lawsuit_0706.pdf

["Governor Schwarzenegger signed a bill that supporters say will improve California's treatment-not-jail law for drug users, but which foes say actually guts the law's original intent. The Drug Policy Alliance and the California Society of Addiction Medicine sued to overturn the new law, claiming it is unconstitutional to significantly amend Proposition 36 — approved by 61 percent of voters in November 2000 — without another popular vote." Oakland Tribune (July 13, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S63302]

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VIOLENCE

Creating Safe Environments: Violence Prevention Strategies and Programs. By the Prevention Institute. (The Institute, Oakland, California ) June 2006. 46 p.

Full Text at: www.preventioninstitute.org/documents/CreatingSafeEnvironmentsfinal62206.pdf

["This report provides an overview of promising violence prevention initiatives across the nation.... Specific focus is given to initiatives directed at particularly vulnerable populations, including racial/ethnic groups, immigrants, low-income populations, girls and women, and others.... An approach to violence prevention which builds on a combination of community and systemic action along with a focus on family and individual resiliency is necessary..... The complexity of violence underlies the need for a strategic approach."]

[Request #S63303]

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YOUTH

Fight Crime: Invest in Kids California: California Survey of Teens. By the Opinion Research Corporation. (The Corporation, Princeton, New Jersey) 2006. 11 p.

Full Text at: www.fightcrime.org/ca/afterschoolpoll/teenpollsummary.pdf

["Nearly one million -— three in 10 California teens -— are left unsupervised after school three or more days each week, according to a new poll.... Many people believe kids are most likely to get in trouble at night or on the weekends, but it is really the after-school hours that law enforcement worries about....The new poll shows that like law enforcement leaders, California teens want to see after-school programs expanded." Contra Costa Times (June 21, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S63304]

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CULTURE AND SOCIETY

LATINOS

Hispanic Attitudes Toward Learning English: Fact Sheet. By Pew Hispanic Center. (The Center, Washington, DC) June 7, 2006. 3 p.

Full Text at: pewhispanic.org/files/factsheets/20.pdf

["Hispanics by a large margin believe that immigrants have to speak English to be a part of American society, and even more so that English should be taught to the children of immigrants, according to a recent survey.... The view that immigrants have to learn English is held by a majority of Latinos regardless of how much money they make or their level of education."]

[Request #S63305]

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DEMOGRAPHY

POPULATION

Where Did They Go? The Decline of Middle-Income Neighborhoods in Metropolitan America. By Jason Booza and others, The Brookings Institution. (The Institution, Washington, DC) June 2006. 24 p.

Full Text at: www.brookings.edu/metro/pubs/20060622_middleclass.pdf

["Although middle-income families have declined considerably as a share of the overall family income distribution, it is noteworthy that middle-class neighborhoods have disappeared even faster in metropolitan areas.... The resulting disparities among neighborhoods create new challenges for policies to enhance household mobility, improve the delivery of key public services, and promote private-sector investment in struggling locales."]

[Request #S63306]

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ECONOMY

BANKING

Financial Access for Immigrants: Lessons from Diverse Perspectives. By Anna Paulson, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, and others. (The Brookings Institution, Washington, DC) 2006. 100 p.

Full Text at: www.brookings.edu/metro/pubs/20060504_financialaccess.pdf

["This paper presents new research on the financial practices of immigrants, and also describes how various institutions have helped move immigrants into the financial mainstream. Improving access to various financial institutions, particularly in inner-city neighborhoods, has been of great interest to policy makers and advocates for decades.... ." The Scout Report (June 23, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S63307]

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GAMBLING INDUSTRY

An Analysis of Internet Gambling and its Policy Implications. By David Stewart, Ropes and Gray. (American Gaming Association, Washington, DC) 2006. 24 p.

Full Text at: www.americangaming.org/assets/files/studies/wpaper_internet_0531.pdf

[While the U.S. Department of Justice and several individual state governments have long held that Internet gambling is illegal in the United States, the online gambling industry currently is thriving, due in large part to participation from U.S. bettors. U.S. residents went online to bet more than $4 billion at off-shore, non-U.S. entities in 2005.... Additionally, a number of foreign nations, including Great Britain, are in the process of legalizing, licensing, regulating and taxing Internet gambling operators."]

[Request #S63308]

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LOS ANGELES

L.A. Stats: 2006. By Los Angeles County Economic Development Center. (The Center, Los Angeles, California) June 2006. 51 p.

Full Text at: laedc.org/reports/LAStats-2006.pdf

["This is a collection of business and economic indicators ... on demographics, employment, income, economic base, real estate, retailing and more ... for Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, Ventura Counties, and in most instances San Diego County. A variety of public and private sources are used."]

[Request #S63309]

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EDUCATION

ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

Reforms that Could Help Narrow the Achievement Gap. By Richard Rothstein, Economic Policy Institute. Policy Perspectives. (WestEd, San Francisco, California) 2006. 12 p.

Full Text at: www.wested.org/online_pubs/pp-06-02.pdf

["Persistent achievement gaps must result from wrongly designed school policies —- either expectations that are too low, teachers who are insufficiently qualified, curricula that are badly designed, classes that are too large, school climates that are too undisciplined, leadership that is too unfocused, or a combination of these. Without complementary investments in early childhood preparation, health care, housing, after-school and summer programs, and other social and economic supports, the achievement gap will never be closed."]

[Request #S63310]

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ACCOUNTABILITY

Who's Counted? Who's Counting? Understanding High School Graduation Rates. By Lyndsay Pinkus, Alliance for Excellent Education. (The Alliance, Washington, DC) 2006. 51 p.

Full Text at: www.all4ed.org/publications/WhosCounting/WhosCounting.pdf

["The report is designed to serve as a 'users guide' to graduation rates. It explains the role that graduation rates play in holding schools, districts, and states accountable (including their role in meeting No Child Left Behind Act requirements) and gives a detailed chronology of reform initiatives. In addition, the various calculation methods are described and a state-by-state comparison of the most commonly reported graduation rates is included. Finally, the report provides policy recommendations that, if implemented, will accelerate much-needed change."]

[Request #S63311]

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DISABILITIES

Helping California Youths with Disabilities Transition to Work or Postsecondary Education: Summary of a GAO Conference. By the Government Accountability Office. GAO-06-759SP. (The Office, Washington, DC) June 20, 2006. 27 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-06-759SP

["Panelists generally agreed youths with disabilities in California do not receive sufficient training in vocational preparation, life skills, and transition planning....They suggested many ways to address these challenges, including beginning transition planning at a younger age, creating internship programs during high school, and bringing in mentors from the working world."]

[Request #S63312]

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EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT STATISTICS

The Labor Force Status of Short-Term Unauthorized Workers. By Pew Hispanic Center. (The Center, Washington, DC) April 13, 2006. 3 p.

Full Text at: pewhispanic.org/files/factsheets/16.pdf

["The overall message is that the number of unauthorized workers has continued to climb. However, the percentage of unauthorized immigrants working in the food processing and agricultural sectors is likely higher in the Northern San Joaquin Valley than the rest of the country."]

[Request #S63315]

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LABOR UNION

The Hess Collection Winery v. California Agricultural Labor Relations Board. California Court of Appeal, Third Appellate District. C04-5405. July 5, 2006. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.courtinfo.ca.gov/opinions/documents/C045405.PDF

["Farm labor unions scored a major legal victory when a court upheld a law designed to end lengthy contract talks by allowing a state mediator to impose a contract on a grower.... . If mediation does not produce an agreement within 30 days, the mediator decides on the contract. Either side can appeal the terms to the state Agricultural Labor Relations Board." San Francisco Chronicle (July 6, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S63313]

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RETIREMENT

Pension Intervention: Reforming California's Public Employee Retirement Systems. By Anthony P. Archie and Peter J. Ferrara, Pacific Research Institute. (The Institute, San Francisco, California) 2006. 49 p.

Full Text at: www.pacificresearch.org/pub/sab/entrep/2006/Pension_Intervention.pdf

["California’s public employee pension systems are unfair, unstable, unpredictable, and outdated. They are unfair because they prevent public employees from having a voice in how their hard-earned dollars are invested. They are unstable because state contribution rates fluctuate wildly. They are unpredictable because pension costs are eating up the budgets of state and local governments. They are outdated because they are incompatible with the demographics and desires of today’s workforce."]

[Request #S63314]

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ENERGY

GEOTHERMAL ENERGY

Renewable Energy: Increased Geothermal Development Will Depend on Overcoming Many Challenges. By the Government Accountability Office. GAO-06-629. (The Office, Washington, DC) May 2006. 47 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/new.items/d06629.pdf

["Geothermal resources currently ... supply heat and hot water to about 2,300 direct use businesses, such as district heating systems, fish farms, greenhouses, food-drying plants, spas, and resorts.... Developers of geothermal electricity plants face many challenges including a capital intensive and risky business environment, developing technology, insufficient transmission capacity, lengthy federal review processes for approving permits and applications, and a complex federal royalty system."]

[Request #S63316]

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RENEWABLE ENERGY

Race to the Top: The Expanding Role of U.S. State Renewable Portfolio Standards. By Barry G. Rabe, University of Michigan. (Pew Center on Global Climate Change, Arlington, Virginia) June 2006. 48 p.

Full Text at: www.pewclimate.org/docUploads/RPSReportFinal%2Epdf

["Twenty-two states have passed laws requiring that a growing percentage of electricity come from renewable-energy sources, such as wind and solar power. The effort has helped launch $475 million in energy projects.... The current leaders in state mandates are California, which requires 33 percent renewable energy by 2020; New York, which requires 25 percent by 2013; and Nevada, which calls for 20 percent by 2015." Wall Street Journal (June 14, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S63317]

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ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES

NATURAL DISASTERS

"Interseismic Strain Accumulation and the Earthquake Potential on the Southern San Andreas Fault System." By Yuri Fialko. IN: Nature, vol. 441, no. 7096 (June 22, 2006) pp. 968- 971.

["The stretch of the San Andreas fault that runs through Southern California has built up enough stress to produce a potentially catastrophic earthquake.... Such a quake could rupture the roughly 100-mile stretch of fault that passes through or near Palm Springs, San Bernardino and Riverside." Orange County Register (June 22, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S63318]

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WATER CONSERVATION

Lawns and Water Demand in California. By Ellen Hanak and Matthew Davis, Public Policy Institute of California. California Economic Policy. (The Institute, San Francisco, California) July 2006. 24 p.

Full Text at: www.ppic.org/content/pubs/cep/EP_706EHEP.pdf

["A new report predicts global warming and an influx of new residents buying homes with big yards in California's hottest, driest regions will lead to a lot more lawns drinking up even more water over the next 25 years. Homeowners should focus on water conservation when they irrigate their landscaping to help offset the inevitable rise in demand." Sacramento Bee (July 13, 2006) A3.]

[Request #S63319]

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WATER RESOURCES

Progress on Incorporating Climate Change into Management of California’s Water Resources. By the California Department of Water Resources. (The Department, Sacramento, California) July 2006.

["Under each of four climate-change scenarios examined in the report, warmer temperatures raise the snow level in California mountains, producing a smaller snowpack and more winter runoff. This means more floodwaters to manage in winter, followed by less snowmelt to bank in reservoirs for drinking water, summer lawns and crop irrigation. The average difference by 2050, according to the report, would be a snowpack statewide that holds 5 million acre-feet less water. That's more than the total capacity of Lake Shasta, the state's largest reservoir." Sacramento Bee (July 11, 2006) 1.]

Report. 338 p.
report

Press Release. 1 p.
press release

[Request #S63320]

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GENERAL GOVERNMENT

CAMPAIGN FINANCE

Randall, et al. v. Sorrell, et al. U.S. Supreme Court. 04-1528. June 26, 2006. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.supremecourtus.gov/opinions/05pdf/04-1528.pdf

["The Supreme Court dealt a defeat to liberal reformers who sought to limit sharply the impact of money in politics. In a 6-3 decision, the court struck down a novel Vermont law that would have strictly limited how much money candidates for state office can spend on their campaigns, as well as how much donors can give them. Had the law been upheld, reformers saw it as a model for other states to limit campaign spending." Los Angeles Times (June 27, 2006) A14.]

[Request #S63321]

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ELECTIONS

Elections: The Nation's Evolving Election System as Reflected in the November 2004 General Election. By the Government Accountability Office. GAO-06-450. (The Office, Washington, DC) June 6, 2006. 534 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-06-450

["The GAO found that states made changes to address some of the challenges identified in the November 2000 election. New challenges arose in the November 2004 election, such as fraudulent, incomplete, or inaccurate applications received through voter registration drives; larger than expected early voter turnout, resulting in long lines; and counting large numbers of absentee ballots and determining the eligibility of provisional voters in time to meet final vote certification deadlines."]

[Request #S63322]

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GOVERNMENT REFORM

Real ID Act: State Implementation Recommendations. By the National Governors Association. (The Association, Washington, DC) 2006. 5 p.

Full Text at: www.nga.org/Files/pdf/0604REALIDRECOMMEND.PDF

["This cooperative effort was designed to determine whether the Real ID Act could be implemented in a practical, economic and efficient manner. The review includes a detailed section-by-section description of the issues raised by the statute; critical concerns of states ... and identification of federal actions required to facilitate implementation."]

[Request #S63323]

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LEGISLATURE

A Profile of Latino Elected Officials in the United States and Their Progress 1996-2006. By National Association of Latino Elected Officials. (The Association, Los Angeles, California) June 2006. 6 p.

["Latinos have increased their presence at all levels of government over the past decade, with more than two-fifths of Latino officials serving in Texas.... At the start of this year, 5,132 Latinos were in elected office around the country -- a 37 percent increase from 1996, when 3,743 Latinos held elected posts." San Jose Mercury News (June 22, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S63324]

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LOCAL TAXES

Report to the Legislature on the Impact of the Implementation of AB 63 (2001): Local Government Sharing Program between the Franchise Tax Board and California Cities. By Martha Jones, California Research Bureau, California State Library. CRB-06-007. (The Bureau, Sacramento, California) June 2006. 132 p.

Full Text at: www.library.ca.gov/crb/06/07/06-007.pdf

["Assembly Bill 63 (2001) permits the California Franchise Tax Board (FTB) to disclose specified income tax information to tax officials of any California city.... The cities can use the FTB data to identify businesses that might be subject to a local business license fee or tax. This report describes the results of a survey of participating and non-participating cities."]

[Request #S63325]

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REINVENTING GOVERNMENT

Six Trends Transforming Government. By Mark A. Abramson and others, IBM Center for the Business of Government. (The Center, Washington, DC) 2006. 32 p.

Full Text at: www.businessofgovernment.org/pdfs/SixTrends.pdf

["Six significant trends are transforming government performance: 1) Changing the Rules; 2) Using Performance Management; 3) Providing Competition, Choice, and Incentives; 4) Performing On Demand; 5) Engaging Citizens; and 6) Using Networks and Partnerships.... We have observed the six trends discussed in this report occurring at all levels of government within the United States -— federal, state, and local -— and governments across the world."]

[Request #S63326]

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HEALTH

CHILDREN

Improving Children's Health: Understanding Children's Health Disparities and Promising Approaches to Address Them. By Elizabeth Pham and others, Children's Defense Fund. (The Fund, Washington, DC) 2006. 93 p.

Full Text at: cdf.convio.net/site/DocServer/CDF_Improving_Children_s_Health_FINAL.pdf?docID=1781

["Reducing health disparities among children is key to improving the well-being of all children and, by extension, the nation as a whole. Our success in reducing health disparities among children will not only lessen future health care costs, but will also improve the nation's productivity."]

[Request #S63327]

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EMERGENCY CARE

Emergency Medical Services: At the Crossroads. AND Hospital-Based Emergency Care: At the Breaking Point. AND Emergency Care for Children: Growing Pains. By the Committee on the Future of Emergency Care in the United States Health System, Board of Healthcare Services, Institute of Medicine. (National Academy Press, Washington, DC) 2006.

["Emergency Medical Services (EMS) is a critical component of our nation's emergency and trauma care system, providing response and medical transport to millions of sick and injured Americans each year.... This new book examines the operational structure of EMS by presenting an in-depth analysis of the current organization, delivery, and financing of these types of services and systems."]

Emergency Medical Services: At the Crossroads: Summary. 29 p.
http://newton.nap.edu/execsumm_pdf/11629

Hospital-Based Emergency Care: At the Breaking Point: Summary. 31 p.
http://newton.nap.edu/execsumm_pdf/11621

Emergency Care for Children: Growing Pains: Summary. 31 p.
http://newton.nap.edu/execsumm_pdf/11655

[Request #S63328]

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"What Accounts For Differences in the Use Of Hospital Emergency Departments Across U.S. Communities?" By Peter J. Cunningham. IN: Health Affairs (July 18, 2006) pp. 324 - 336.

Full Text at: content.healthaffairs.org/cgi/reprint/hlthaff.25.w324v1.pdf

["Communities with high Emergency Department (ED) use have fewer numbers of uninsured, Hispanic, and noncitizen residents. Outpatient capacity constraints also contribute to high ED use. However, high ED use in some communities also likely reflects generic preferences for EDs as a source of care for nonurgent problems."]

[Request #S63329]

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INSURANCE

The Coverage Gap: A State-by-State Report on Access to Care. By the State Health Access Data Assistance Center, University of Minnesota. Prepared for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. (The Foundation, Princeton, New Jersey) 2006. 27 p.

Full Text at: covertheuninsured.org/media/research/CoverageGap0406.pdf

["This report is a comprehensive state-by-state analysis on access to health care. The researchers analyzed health disparities between insured and uninsured adults. They also looked at the number of Americans age 50-64 that are without health care coverage."]

[Request #S63330]

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LEAD POISONING

People of the State of California, et al. v. Alpro Alimento Proteinicos, S.A. de C.V., et al. Los Angeles County Superior Court. [Proposed] Consent Judgment Resolving Claims Against Defendants. BC318207. June 29, 2006. 36 p.

Full Text at: ag.ca.gov/newsalerts/cms06/06-062_0a.pdf

["Children who eat popular Mexican candies available in local stores shouldn't have to worry about getting lead in many of their spicy favorites after three top candy makers signed a first- of-its-kind settlement with the state of California. The candy makers, including subsidiaries of Mars and Hershey, agreed to annual audits of their companies and chili suppliers, lead testing, and a one-time cash payment of nearly $1 million to reduce lead industry wide and pay legal fees." Orange County Register (June 29, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S63331]

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HOUSING

RENTAL HOUSING

The Curious Institution of Mobile Home Rent Control: An Analysis of Mobile Home Parks in California. By Carl Mason and John M. Quigley, Program on Housing and Urban Policy, University of California, Berkeley. (The University, Berkeley, California) June 2006. 46 p.

Full Text at: repositories.cdlib.org/iber/bphup/working_papers/W04-007

["This paper presents an economic analysis of mobile home rent control and a detailed empirical assessment of vacancy decontrol rent regulation in three mobile home parks in three different housing markets in California.... We analyze the economics of rent control when these regulations are applied to mobile homes or manufactured housing located in mobile home parks. These price controls are common in several states, notably California, where approximately ninety cities impose them and where, with few exceptions, it is the only form of local rent regulation not prohibited by state law."]

[Request #S63332]

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HUMAN SERVICES

TEMPORARY ASSISTANCE FOR NEEDY FAMILIES

New TANF Regulations Released. By Federal Funds Information for States. FFIS Issue Brief. (FFIS, Washington, DC) July 17, 2006. 3 p.

Full Text at: www.ncsl.org/ffis/subs/ib/2006/IB06-30.pdf

["The passage of the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 ... reauthorized the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program through federal fiscal year (FY) 2010.... Many states will find it extremely difficult to meet the new requirements and will be subject to penalties, especially if a normal economic cycle sets in and economic growth slows. They also will experience substantial new administrative costs."]

[Request #S63333]

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Implementing the TANF Changes in the Deficit Reduction Act: "Win-Win" Solutions for Families and States. By Sharron Parrott and others. (Center for Law and Social Policy and Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, Washington, DC) May 9, 2006. 107 p.

Full Text at: en.groundspring.org/EmailNow/pub.php?module=URLTracker&cmd=track&j=76277095&u=701637

["In the coming months, states will face key choices as they decide the next direction for their Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)programs. Congress enacted changes to TANF that substantially increases the proportion of recipients who must participate in work activities. The new requirements will be challenging for most states."]

[Request #S63334]

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TRANSPORTATION

PORTS & SHIPPING

Protecting the Nation's Seaports: Balancing Security and Cost. Edited by Jon D. Haveman and Howard J. Shatz, Public Policy Institute of California. (The Institute, San Francisco, California) June 2006.

["[The report] examines in detail the full dimensions of the task of port security. An array of experts on maritime security [provides a] broad overview of port security issues that includes projections of the effects on the national economy of a successful port attack, the private sector implications of improving port security, a first-hand account of the considerable bureaucratic challenges that still must be overcome to strengthen individual ports, and guidelines for financing future port security efforts."]

Report. 271 p.
http://www.ppic.org/content/pubs/report/R_606JHR.pdf

Research Brief. 2 p.
http://www.ppic.org/content/pubs/rb/RB_606JHRB.pdf

[Request #S63335]

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VEHICLE FEES

No More Just Throwing Money Out the Window: Using Road Tolls to Cut Congestion, Protect the Environment, and Boost Access for All. By Michael Replogle and Keri Funderburg, Environmental Defense. (Environmental Defense, New York, New York) 2006. 32 p.

Full Text at: www.environmentaldefense.org/documents/5257_TollingReport0506.pdf

["The report explores how toll roads and public-private partnership contracts and legislation could promote environmental stewardship and equity. If public-private partnership road projects apply tolls only to new lanes and use toll revenues only to build more roads, they will tend to exacerbate environmental and equity problems; however, if tolls are used to manage both new and existing lanes for higher performance and to fund public transit and impact mitigation, equity and the environment can benefit greatly." TRB Newsletter (June 7, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S63336]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

EDUCATION

SCHOOL REFORM

Cutting Through the Hype: A Taxpayer's Guide to School Reforms. By Jane L. David and Larry Cuban. (Education Week Press, Bethesda, Maryland) 2006. 120 p.

["Drawing on their many years of experience as educators and researchers, the authors give readers their insights on the often-times too-hopeful promises made for various reforms and the hard work and conditions necessary to make those promises come true. Their appraisal of reforms and rules of thumb will help policymakers, citizens, and educators turn good ideas into sound policies."]

[Request #S63337]

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