Subject: Studies in the News 06-26 (June 13, 2006)


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News:
Employment, Training, Vocational Education and Welfare to Work Supplement


Contents This Week

Introductory Material DEMOGRAPHY
   Aging society and economic growth
   Preparing for an aging population
   Living longer and working longer
EMPLOYMENT
   Permanent disability rating system
   Nonstandard work and benefits
   Survey of agricultural workers
   Low-wage immigrant workers
   Taxes paid by immigrants
   Labor adjustment assistance
   Social Security benefit expectations
   Effects of delaying retirement
   Adult perception of mother's retirement
   High-skilled manufacturing workforce
   Federal definition of substantial unemployment
   Decline in low-income training assistance
   Undercounting unemployment
   Day laborers
   Low-wage workers and employers
   Welfare reform increasing parent's incomes
   Nanomaterials in the workplace
   New urban workforce
   Outsourcing American jobs
   Reducing training and employment services
   Workforce training in L.A.
   Random assignment tests employment programs
   Workforce development staff competencies
   Workforce development collaboratives
   Workforce development systems
   Safety in smaller workplace
   Youth school enrollment and employment
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
   Telework during an emergency
   Performance management in state and local government
   Federal telework guidelines
HEALTH
   Changes in employer-sponsored health insurance
HUMAN SERVICES
   Transitional jobs for TANF recipients
   TANF changes and California's response
   New TANF caseload reduction provisions
   Increasing TANF education and training activities
TRANSPORTATION
   Bay area firms rank as best for commuters
PREVIOUSLY IN STUDIES IN THE NEWS
   Studies in the News, January 2006 - June 2006
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News is a very current compilation of items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau to supplement the public policy debate in California’s Capitol. To help share the latest information with state policymakers, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library’s website. This week's list of current articles in various public policy areas is presented below.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • California State Employees may contact the State Information & Reference Center (916-654-0206; cslsirc@library.ca.gov) with the SITN issue number and the item number [S#].

  • All other interested individuals should contact their local library - the items may be available there, or may be borrowed by your local library on your behalf.

The following studies are currently on hand:

DEMOGRAPHY

BABY BOOMERS

Demography Is Not Destiny, Revisited. By Robert B. Friedland and Laura Summer, Center on an Aging Society, Georgetown University. Prepared for The Commonwealth Fund. (The Fund, New York, New York) 2005. 120 p.

Full Text at: www.cmwf.org/usr_doc/789_friedland_demographynotdestinyII.pdf

["The critical challenge of an aging society is not so much how to accommodate the older population, but how to ensure the productivity of future workers, regardless of age.... Greater economic growth can make policy choices easier, but deciding how much of the proceeds of economic growth to use collectively and how to distibute costs and benefits will require political and policy changes."]

[Request #S51008]

Return to the Table of Contents

ELDERLY

Global Population Aging in the 21st Centery and Its Economic Implications. By the Congressional Budget Office. (The Office, Washington, DC) 2005. 48 p.

Full Text at: www.cbo.gov/ftpdocs/69xx/doc6952/12-12-Global.pdf

["The effect of a rapidly expanding workforce on economic growth may be enhanced in developing countries by deliberate investment in education, by the development of flexible financial markets to channel savings to productive uses, and by openness to trade. Policies that encourage adequate retirement preparation could help rapidly aging developed countries prepare for a growing elderly population, whereas the effects of aging could be exacerbated by pension programs that discourage private saving or continued part-time work in retirement or that encourage relatively early retirement."]

[Request #S62602]

Return to the Table of Contents

OLDER AMERICANS

Living Longer, Working Longer: The Changing Landscape of the Aging Workforce. By the Metlife Mature Market Institute and others. (The Institute, New York, New York) April 2006. 28 p.

Full Text at: www.metlife.com/WPSAssets/11931727601144937501V1FLivingLonger.pdf

["This study describes the decisions that older workers are actually making about work and retirement. The findings in this study have important implications for employers, who will need to retain and recruit more older workers in the years ahead as the age distribution of the U.S. labor pool shifts and serious shortages develop in specific professions, industries and geographic regions. This report also provides important insights for policy makers trying to understand how government can best address the impact of the huge demographic changes that are about to hit the industrialized world."]

[Request #S62609]

Return to the Table of Contents

EMPLOYMENT

DISABLED WORKERS

An Evaluation of California’s Permanent Disability Rating System. By Robert T. Reville and others, RAND. Prepared for the California Commission on Health and Safety and Workers’ Compensation. (RAND, Santa Monica, California) 2005. 172 p.

Full Text at: www.rand.org/pubs/monographs/2005/RAND_MG258.pdf

["The rating system that California used until recently to rank the severity of permanently disabling workplace injuries and to assign workers' compensation benefits was highly controversial.... The ratings were not consistent for impairments that were judged to be similarly severe but that affected different body parts. And ratings were inconsistent among physicians examining the same impairment. Recent reforms might improve the system, but they should be monitored to ensure that both workers and employers benefit from the reforms."]

[Request #S62606]

Return to the Table of Contents

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS

Nonstandard Jobs, Substandard Benefits. By Peter S. Fisher, Iowa Policy Project, and others. (The Project, Mount Vernon, Iowa) 2005. 52 p.

Full Text at: www.cfcw.org/Nonstandard.pdf

["Over the last 15 to 20 years, more and more employers have turned to part-time, temporary and contract employees to do the work once done by their regular workforce. In 2001, at least 25 percent of workers — and probably more — were in one of these 'nonstandard' jobs. In this report, we examine recent trends in nonstandard work, identify the ways in which nonstandard employment is undercounted, document the characteristics of nonstandard workers, and estimate the extent of misclassification of workers by employers. Finally, we make recommendations regarding ways to survey and measure nonstandard work and health insurance coverage, we identify policies to remove the incentive for employers to deliberately misclassify employees, and we critique alternative approaches to address the special problems that nonstandard work poses for health insurance policy."]

[Request #S62603]

Return to the Table of Contents

FARM LABOR

California Farm Labor Force: Overview and Trends from the National Agricultural Workers Survey. By Aguirre International. (Aguirre International, Burlingame, California) 2005. 64 p.

Full Text at: apmp.berkeley.edu/images/stories/LaborMarketInfo/calnaws.2003-04.pdf

["The report was initiated as a result of 'The Farmworker Health Issues in California' meeting held in San Diego on January 31, 2005, a collaborative effort of the California Office of Binational Border Health, California-Mexico Health Initiative, California Program on Access to Care and the US Environmental Projection Agency Region 9. This meeting highlighted the need for current demographic, occupational and health information on California’s farmworker population."]

[Request #S62604]

Return to the Table of Contents

IMMIGRATION

Suburban Sweatshops: The Fight for Immigrant Rights. By Jennifer Gordon. (Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts) 2005. 364 p.

["Jorge Bonilla is hospitalized with pneumonia from sleeping at the restaurant where he works, unable to afford rent on wages of thirty cents an hour. Domestic worker Yanira Juarez discovers she has labored for six months with no wages at all; her employer lied about establishing a savings account for her. We live in an era of the sweatshop reborn. In 1992 Jennifer Gordon founded the Workplace Project to help immigrant workers in the underground suburban economy of Long Island, New York. In a story of determination and hope, she weaves together Latino immigrant life and legal activism to tell the tale of how the most vulnerable workers in society came together to demand fair wages, safe working conditions, and respect from employers."] NOTE: Suburban Sweatshops... is available for loan.

[Request #S62605]

Return to the Table of Contents

Civic Contributions: Taxes Paid by Immigrants in the Washington, DC, Metropolitan Area. By Randy Capps, Urban Institute, and others. (The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, Washington, DC) May 2006. 60 p.

Full Text at: www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/411338_civic_contributions.pdf

["This report provides estimates of the federal, state and local taxes paid by immigrants in metropolitan Washington, D.C. in 1999-2000. The region's almost 1 million immigrant families comprised 21 percent of all households and had $29.5 billion in income, or 19 percent of the income of all households. Immigrants paid 18 percent of the region's total taxes, even though they had lower incomes on average than non-immigrant households ($78,000 versus $88,000)." Urban Institute Update (June 7, 2006).]

[Request #S62607]

Return to the Table of Contents

LABOR MARKET CONDITIONS

Adjustment Assistance: Labor Should Take Action to Ensure Performance Data Are Complete, Accurate, and Accessible. By the U.S. Government Accountability Office. GAO-06-496. (The Office, Washington, DC) April 25, 2006. 60 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-06-496

["In the current tight budgetary environment, program performance is likely to be an increasingly significant factor used to help policymakers access programs and determine funding levels. Given concerns over the quality of performance data for the Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) Program and the importance of having meaningful information to assess program performance, we examined (1) whether the TAA performance data provide a credible picture of the program’s performance, (2) what TAA performance data Labor makes available to the public and states and the usefulness of the data for managing the program, and (3) what Labor is doing to address issues with the quality of TAA data submitted by states."]

[Request #S62608]

Return to the Table of Contents

RETIREMENT

The Impact of Misperceptions about Social Security on Saving and Well-being. By Susann Rohwedder and Arthur van Soest, RAND. (Michigan Retirement and Research Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan) May 2006. 35 p.

Full Text at: www.mrrc.isr.umich.edu/publications/papers/pdf/wp118.pdf

["This study looks at the difference between expected versus received Social Security benefits and its impact on the consumption patterns and well-being of retirees. The authors find that a quarter of those surveyed overestimated their benefits by 10 percent or more and a quarter underestimated their benefits by 12 percent or more... Respondents who said that their retirement years were 'not as good' as their pre-retirement years, overestimated their Social Security benefits by nearly 15 percent. The study concludes that those who overestimate their Social Security benefits do not fare as well in retirement with regard to their consumption levels, their experience of retirement, and their level of worry." IWPR's Social Security and Women Alert (May 31, 2006).]

[Request #S62610]

Return to the Table of Contents

Working for a Good Retirement. By Barbara A. Butrica and others, the Urban Institute. Discussion Paper 06-03. (The Institute, Washington, DC) May 2006. 42 p.

Full Text at: www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/311333_good_retirement.pdf

["Choosing when to retire is the most important decision workers will make. This report examines how delaying retirement for nondisabled workers would affect individual retiree benefits, the solvency of the Social Security trust fund, and general revenues. The results suggest that delaying retirement by itself does not generate enough additional revenue to make Social Security solvent by 2045. Benefit cuts or supplementary funding will be necessary to achieve solvency. However, the size of the benefit cuts or tax increases could be minimized if individuals worked longer. Additional work also substantially increases workers' retirement well-being."]

[Request #S62611]

Return to the Table of Contents

Mom's Retirement Security. By Catherine Hill, American Association of University Women Educational Foundation. (The Foundation, Washington, DC) May 2006. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.aauw.org/research/mothersdaypoll2006.pdf

["Most adult children surveyed reported knowing some or a lot about their mother’s financial situation. Forty percent of adult children with mothers 65 or older and 30 percent of those with mothers under 65 believe their mothers to be very financially secure. Only 14 percent of adult children with mothers 65 or older and 12 percent of those with mothers under 65 believe (or perceive) their mothers lack financial security. The percentage of adult children who expect pensions and 401(k)s will be their own largest source of income in retirement (34 percent) is also higher than those who believe Social Security will be their primary source of income (15 percent)." IWPR's Women and Social Security Alert (May 31, 2006).]

[Request #S62612]

Return to the Table of Contents

SKILLED WORK FORCE

A Leaner, More Skilled U.S. Manufacturing Workforce. By Richard Deitz and James Orr, Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Current Issues in Economics and Finance. Vol. 12 No. 2. (The Bank, New York, New York) February/March 2006. 7 p.

Full Text at: www.newyorkfed.org/research/current_issues/ci12-2.pdf

["While the U.S. manufacturing sector has contracted sharply since the early 1980s, employment in high-skill manufacturing occupations has risen by an impressive 37 percent. An investigation of the growth in high-skill manufacturing jobs reveals that virtually all of the nation's industries have shared in this trend. Moreover, skill upgrading has occurred in all parts of the country, even those experiencing severe employment losses."]

[Request #S62613]

Return to the Table of Contents

UNEMPLOYMENT PROGRAMS

Adjustment Made in WIA "Substantial Unemployment" Designation. By Federal Funds Information for States. Issue Brief. 06-15. (FFIS, Washington, DC) March 22, 2006. 2 p.

Full Text at: www.ncsl.org/ffis/subs/ib/2006/IB06-15.pdf

["This past September, the Department of Labor's Employment and Training Administration announced the criteria states are to use when designating Areas of Substantial Unemployment in order to receive Workforce Investment Act funds."]

[Request #S62614]

Return to the Table of Contents

Declining Share of Adults Receiving Training under WIA are Low-Income or Disadvantaged. By Abbey Frank and Elisa Minoff, Center for Law and Social Policy. (The Center, Washington, DC) 2005. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.clasp.org/publications/decline_in_wia_training.pdf

[“The share of training recipients who are low-income or have barriers to employment has dropped since WIA was enacted. This paper considers some possible explanations for this decline, and offers recommendations for WIA reauthorization and state and local action to increase the share of training resources directed to adults who are low-income, single parents, or have other barriers to finding and keeping employment.”]

[Request #S62626]

Return to the Table of Contents

UNEMPLOYMENT STATISTICS

Missing Inaction: Evidence of Undercounting of Non-Workers in the Current Population Survey. By John Schmidtt and Dean Baker, Center for Economic and Policy Research. (The Center, Washington, DC)2006. 31 p.

Full Text at: www.cepr.net/publications/undercounting_cps_2006_01.pdf

["The report noted that a large and growing portion of the population does not respond to the Current Population Survey, and that the non-responders appear less likely to be employed than people who take the survey. This overstatement is significant because the CPS is the source for the government's most important statistics on the labor market, including the unemployment rate, poverty rate and health-insurance coverage."]

[Request #S62615]

Return to the Table of Contents

UNSKILLED WORKERS

Day Laborers. By Andrew Barwig, National Conference of State Legislatures. NCSL Legisbrief. Vol. 14, No. 22. (NCSL, Denver, Colorado) April/May 2006. 2 p.

["More than 100,000 U.S. workers daily are looking for jobs or working as day laborers. Day laborers are protected by federal and state employment laws; laws in nine states expand protections for these workers."]

[Request #S61920]

Return to the Table of Contents

A New Approach to Low-Wage Workers and Employers. By Jacquelyn Anderson and others, MRDC. (MDRC, Washington, DC) March 2006. 82 p.

Full Text at: www.mdrc.org/publications/424/full.pdf

["Low-income workers, a large segment of the U.S. labor market, make important contributions to the nation's economy. However, many do not keep their jobs -- at a notable cost to their employers -- or do not advance to better positions that would meet labor market demand... This report provides an early picture of the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead... While the report should be of particular interest to workforce and welfare professionals and policymakers, it also speaks to a broad audience with a stake in both meeting labor market demand and raising the income of low-income workers."]

[Request #S62616]

Return to the Table of Contents

WELFARE RECIPIENTS

Welfare Reform: More Informaton Needed to Assess Promising Strategies to Increase Parents' Incomes. By the U.S. Government Accountability Office. GAO-06-108 (The Office, Washington, DC) December 2005. 61 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/new.items/d06108.pdf

["Following major welfare refom in 1996, the number of families receiving cash assistance was cut in half. While many former recipients now rely more on their earnings, they often work at low-wage jobs with limited benefits.... To better understand how to help these individuals and their families attain economic self-sufficiency, GAO is reporting on 1) strategies designed to increase income for TANF recipients through employment; 2) the key factors related to implementing and operating such strategies; and 3) actions the Department of Health and Human Services has taken to facilitate the use of experts to gather infomration about promising strategies."]

[Request #S62617]

Return to the Table of Contents

WORK CONDITIONS

Nanomaterials in the Workplace: Policy and Planning Workshop on Occupational Safety and Health. By James T. Bartis and Eric Landree, RAND. (RAND, Santa Monica, California) 2006. 33 p.

Full Text at: www.rand.org/pubs/conf_proceedings/2006/RAND_CF227.pdf

["Over the past few years, various organizations inside and outside of government have focused attention on the lack of understanding of the human health and environmental consequences of nanomaterials. Workers involved with the manufacture or handling of nanomaterials are viewed as being especially susceptible to receiving high exposures to those materials... Four problem areas are: 1) knowledge gaps related to health risks and worker protections; 2) shortfalls in fundamental scientific knowledge common to broad classes of nanomaterials; 3) funds being allocated to understanding the occupational, health, and environmental risks of emerging nanomaterials are not commensurate with the pace of development of new nanomaterials; and 4) cooperation among federal agencies and between the public and private sectors is essential for progress."]

[Request #S62618]

Return to the Table of Contents

WORKFORCE

"The Changing Face of America's Changing Workforce." By Marvin B. Greene. IN: Safety and Health, vol. 173, no. 5 (May 2006) pp. 36-38.

["The article focuses on the status of the urban workforce in the U.S. There is an influx of rural, immigrant and migrant workers especially in construction and manufacturing industries. New dynamics for occupational safety and health have emerged. The workers may lack perspective on urban safety practices or may have communication problems particularly for immigrant workers. The Occupational Safety and Hazard Administration has provided training for organizations in dealing with such issues."]

[Request #S62531]

Return to the Table of Contents

Outsourcing America: What’s Behind Our National Crisis and How We Can Reclaim American Jobs. By Ron Hira and Anil Hira. (American Management Association, New York, New York) 2005. 236 p.

["One of the hottest, most controversial topics in the news is the outsourcing of American jobs to other countries. Outsourced jobs are extending well beyond the manufacturing sector to include white-collar professionals, particularly in information technology, financial services, and customer service. The authors discuss policies that countries like India and China use to attract U.S. industries, and they offer frank recommendations that business and political leaders must consider in order to confront this snowballing crisis -- and bring more high-paying jobs back to the U.S."] NOTE: Outsourcing America... is available for loan.

[Request #S62619]

Return to the Table of Contents

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

Reform or Dismantling? President's Workforce System Proposal Raises Serious Concerns. By Abbey Frank and Evelyn Ganzglass, Center for Law and Social Policy. (The Center, Washington, DC) 2006. 5 p.

Full Text at: www.clasp.org/publications/workforce_07budget.doc

["President Bush’s 2007 budget proposal calls for drastic reduction in funding for training and employment services and the consolidation of Workforce Investment Act and Employment Service programs into a single block grant to states. The proposed changes would channel most of the remaining resources into individual training vouchers thus diminishing state and local flexibility to tailor programs to meet the needs of employers and job seekers, especially low-income adults, hard-to-employ individuals, and disadvantaged youth."]

[Request #S62620]

Return to the Table of Contents

L.A. Workforce Investment. By Patrick Burns and Daniel Flaming, Economic Roundtable. Prepared for the Los Angeles Economy Project. (The Roundtable, Los Angeles, California) 2006. 16 p.

Full Text at: www.economicrt.org/pub/la_workforce_investment/LA_Workforce_Investment.pdf

["This is a briefing paper on labor market preparedness and workforce training. Findings are drawn from the LA Economy Project: 1) 1 in 4 workers in the city do not earn a living wage; 2) 1 in 6 workers are linguistically isolated; 3) there is a rough northwest/southeast divide in the prosperity of LA's resident workers; and 4) increased levels of targeted job training and skill development are needed."]

[Request #S62621]

Return to the Table of Contents

Making Random Assignment Happen: Evidence from the UK Employment Retention and Advancement Demonstration. By Robert Walker, University of Oxford, and others. Research Report. No. 330. (Department for Work and Pensions, Leeds, United Kingdom) 2006.

["The largest random assignment test of a social policy’s effectiveness in Britain to date is being applied in a demonstration of the Employment Retention and Advancement program. The initiative aims to help low-income single parents and the long-term unemployed find jobs and advance in the labor market. This report examines how well random assignment worked and draws lessons for future social policy evaluations." New from MDRC (March 28, 2006).]

Summary. 4 p.:
http://www.mdrc.org/publications/425/summary.pdf

Full Report. 114 p.:
http://www.mdrc.org/publications/425/full.pdf

[Request #S62622]

Return to the Table of Contents

Workforce Development Staff Competencies. By Diana Hinton Noel, National Conference of State Legislatures. Legisbrief. Vol. 14, No. 5. (NCSL, Washington, DC) January 2006. 2 p.

["The workforce development system combines federal, state and local agencies, organizations and programs. A uniform foundation of shared staff competencies helps to provide better service to customers of the system."]

[Request #S62623]

Return to the Table of Contents

Building Institutions from the Region Up: Regional Workforce Development Collaboratives in California. By Karen Chapple, Department of City and Regional Planning, U.C. Berkeley. (Institute of Urban and Regional Development, Berkeley, California) 2005. 97 p.

Full Text at: repositories.cdlib.org/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1041&context=iurd

["The study of regional workforce development collaboratives in California looks at a new approach to the problem of linking economic and workforce development –- in particular, a theory of change proposed by a group of stakeholders from a variety of sectors (government, foundations, and the workforce development system) in the late 1990s. To meet the multiple goals of increasing economic opportunity, decreasing poverty, and increasing regional economic competitiveness, these experts advocated a new workforce development system that was collaborative in scope, regional in scale, career-oriented in focus, and data intensive in strategy."]

[Request #S62624]

Return to the Table of Contents

California's Workforce Development System: Contours and Key Challenges. By Barbara Baran, California Budget Project. (The Project, Sacramento, California) February 2006. 9 p.

Full Text at: www.dchsconferenceonpoverty.org/papers/baran_paper.pdf

["This paper defines workforce development programs as those that wholly or in large part engage in one of the following four activities: labor exchange (matching workers to job openings), job training, adult basic education, or vocational rehabilitation. There are programs for both adults and youth. This paper briefly reviews the principal components of California’s adult workforce development system, details some key policy challenges workforce programs and institutions confront in effectively serving low-skilled, low-wage Californians, and presents recommendations for addressing these challenges."]

[Request #S62625]

Return to the Table of Contents

WORKPLACE SAFETY

Small Businesses and Workplace Fatality Risk: An Exploratory Analysis. By John Mendeloff and others, RAND. (RAND, Santa Monica, California) 2006. 76 p.

Full Text at: www.rand.org/pubs/technical_reports/2006/RAND_TR371.pdf

[“Research based on government data comes to a conclusion that many may find surprising: small, single-site firms, where an owner may be present and communication is constant, are among the safest places to work... Smaller companies have a special dynamic that works in their favor: close relationships that heighten the responsibility an employer feels toward her employees. Across most industries, single work sites operated by companies with fewer than 50 employees had lower fatality rates than similarly sized sites run by larger employers with up to 999 workers.” Los Angeles Times (May 5, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S62627]

Return to the Table of Contents

YOUTH

America’s Youth at 18: School Enrollment and Employment Transitions Between Ages 17 and 18. By the Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor. (The Department, Washington, DC) 2006. 10 p.

Full Text at: www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/nlsyth.pdf

[“When it comes to transitioning to adulthood, young women appear to fare better than young men on several academic measures. The study found that teen girls were less likely than boys to drop out of high school, more likely to finish high school on time and more likely to enroll in college. Males were considerably more likely to still be in high school at age 18 than were females.” Youth Today (April 2006) 23.]

[Request #S62628]

Return to the Table of Contents

GENERAL GOVERNMENT

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

Continuity of Operations: Selected Agencies Could Improve Planning for Use of Alternative Facilities and Telework During Disruptions. By the U.S. Government Accountability Office. GAO-06-713 (The Office, Washington, DC) May 2006. 71 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/new.items/d06713.pdf

["Few agencies have prepared to use telework effectively during an emergency. Teleworking would be particularly helpful in ensuring that agencies continue their essential services during a pandemic which could send absentee rates as high as 40 percent and last for weeks or months. During this time, federal employees may be ill, caring for ill family members or distancing themselves out of fear of infection. Hurricane Katrina last year demonstrated that teleworking is a critical alternative for federal workers. Each agency is supposed to include telework in its continuity of operations preparations." Government Computer News (May 15, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S62629]

Return to the Table of Contents

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

Performance Management in State and Local Government. By the Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government. (The Institute, Albany, New York) 2005. 87 p.

Full Text at: www.rockinst.org/weinberg/pdf/PerformanceManagementReport.pdf

["In 2005, the Rockefeller Institute held a public policy forum on the state and local role in performance management in New York State.... This introduction is organized bottom-up, beginning with the local level and then discussing the state and federal levels."]

[Request #S62630]

Return to the Table of Contents

REGULATIONS

Federal Management Regulation: Guidelines for Alternative Workplace Arrangements. By the United States Office of Governmentwide Policy, General Services Agency. IN: Federal Register. vol. 71, no. 52. (March 17, 2006) pp. 13845-13848

Full Text at: edocket.access.gpo.gov/2006/pdf/E6-3942.pdf

["GSA’s Office of Governmentwide Policy offers definitions of telework and other alternative workplace arrangements agencies should consider so they can be in compliance with teleworking laws. It also officially states that agencies must consider telework as a potential alternative to acquiring more office space or other facilities. While most agencies already have telework guidelines in place, this bulletin is significant because it is the first governmentwide policy statement on the issue from GSA." Government Computer News, March 17, 2006 online.]

[Request #S62631]

Return to the Table of Contents

HEALTH

INSURANCE

Shifting Ground: Changes in Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance. By the State Health Access Data Assistance Center, University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Prepared for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. (The Foundation, Princeton, New Jersey) 2006. 45 p.

Full Text at: www.rwjf.org/newsroom/CTUWFinalResearchReport2006.pdf

["California workers are increasingly turning down health insurance offered by their employers, according to this study. About 82 percent of California workers accepted their employer's coverage in 2003, down from 87 percent in 1998. Nationally, the percentage of workers who accepted their employers' plans dropped to 80 from 85 percent during that same period.... More workers are declining employer-backed plans largely because they are required to contribute more money for their coverage. This shift affects not only the health of workers but also the vitality of the companies that employ them." San Francisco Chronicle (May 5, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S62632]

Return to the Table of Contents

HUMAN SERVICES

TEMPORARY ASSISTANCE FOR NEEDY FAMILIES

Transitional Jobs: Helping TANF Recipients with Barriers to Employment Succeed in the Labor Market. By Allegra Baider and Abbey Frank, Center for Law and Social Policy. (The Center, Washington, DC) May 23, 2006. 10 p.

Full Text at: www.clasp.org/publications/transitional_jobs_06.pdf

["Quantitative and qualitative research suggests that transitional jobs programs have the potential to help individuals with barriers to employment successfully transition into the labor market. Since many of the families who continue to receive cash assistance under TANF have significant barriers, states seeking an effective approach to serving this population while simultaneously meeting stricter participation requirements mandated by the DRA, should consider creating and/or expanding wage-paying transitional jobs programs. Transitional jobs programs provide clients with the skills and experience they need to succeed in their journey toward economic independence.'"]

[Request #S62633]

Return to the Table of Contents

California's Response to Recent TANF Changes Should Preserve the Strengths of the CalWORKs Program. By Scott Graves, California Budget Project. Budget Brief. (The Project, Sacramento, California) May 2006. 6 p.

Full Text at: www.cbp.org/2006/0605_bb_calworks.pdf

["The reauthorization of the TANF block grant provides California an opportunity to build on the strong foundation of the CalWORKs Program, which was created with bipartisan support in 1997. Prior to considering proposals to modify CalWORKs, policymakers should identify the program’s key strengths and ensure that any proposed changes preserve or enhance those strengths, including a strong work incentive, a broad range of work-related activities, child care and other supportive services, a safety net for children, and flexibility for counties within a framework of state standards."]

[Request #S62634]

Return to the Table of Contents

New TANF Caseload Reduction Provisions to Put Pressure on States. By Federal Funds Information for States. Issue Brief. 06-04. (FFIS, Washington, DC) January 31, 2006. 4 p.

["New funding is provided for contingency funds, health-marrige promotion and fatherhood programs. The measure also extends TANF supplemental grants for three years, and extends transitional medical assistance and abstinence education programs through December 31, 2006. Reauthorization would not include the major changes to work hours, participation rates or work activities that were put forth in earlier TANF proposals. However, the bill does contain a change to the caseload reduction credit, which may have a severe impact on states."]

[Request #S62635]

Return to the Table of Contents

Strategies for Increasing Participation in TANF Education and Training Activities. By Evelyn Ganzglass, Center for Law and Social Policy. (The Center, Washington, DC) April 17, 2006. 16 p.

Full Text at: en.groundspring.org/EmailNow/pub.php?module=URLTracker&cmd=track&j=72856139&u=669564

["The Temporary Assistance for Needy Families provisions in the fiscal year 2006 federal budget will require most states to substantially increase the number of TANF recipients participating in work-related activities. This paper aims to help state policymakers, program administrators, and others identify approaches to meeting federal participation rates while also improving programs' ability to help families enter and maintain sustainable employment. It also examines rates of participation in education and training, and recommends strategies to expand access to these activities within the new TANF policy context."]

[Request #S62636]

Return to the Table of Contents

TRANSPORTATION

COMMUTERS & COMMUTING

Energy Savings Boost Companies Onto List of Best Workplaces for Commuters: Press Release. By the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (The Agency, Washington, DC) October 19, 2005. 3 p.

Full Text at: yosemite.epa.gov/opa/admpress.nsf/d9bf8d9315e942578525701c005e573c/6dc8c2a79cf0687d8525709f0043574c!OpenDocument

["Silicon Valley, home to some of the Bay Area's most punishing commutes, boasts seven companies that rank among the nation's top 20 best workplaces for commuters.... The Best Workplace for Commuters rankings recognize the companies for their efforts in reducing fuel consumption, vehicle emissions and traffic congestion.... To qualify for the rankings, the companies had to offer significant commuting programs, including transit subsidies, shuttle services, carpool incentives, flexible working conditions and access to an emergency ride home service." San Francisco Chronicle (October 19, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S62637]

Return to the Table of Contents


PREVIOUSLY IN STUDIES IN THE NEWS
[This section links to items in Studies in the News since the last Employment, Training, Vocational Education and Welfare to Work Supplement.]

EMPLOYMENT

"Employment, Education, and Human Services." IN: Studies in the News, Issue 06-05 (January 2006) - 06-25 (June 2006).

[Includes: "Welfare reform bonuses for states;" "Undocumented workers entitled to workers' compensation;" "Few replacements for retiring public managers;" "Treatment denials for injured workers;" "Perils faced by forest workers;" "Minimum wage economics;" "Decline of United Farmworkers Union;" "Day-labor industry workplace violations;" "Court upholds race-bias suit against San Francisco;" "Trade adjustment assistance needed;" "Minimum wage facts;" "Bridge worker safety;" "Improper activities by state employees;" "Reducing the illegal alien population;" "Financial preparedness for retirement;" "Increased skills for low-wage workers;" and others.]

[Request #S]

Return to the Table of Contents