Subject: Studies in the News 06-10 (March 7, 2006)


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Studies in the News for
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Children and Families Commission


Contents This Week

Introductory Material ECONOMY
   Economic impact of child care industry
EDUCATION
   Annual report on Pre-K
   Head Start and crime reduction
   Benefits of early childhood programs
HEALTH
   Autism conference report
   Early child development data sources
   Smarter spending for child well-being
   Healthy families facts and figures
   Infant and maternal mortality and morbidity
HUMAN SERVICES
   Child care and children of color
   Child welfare and policy reform
STUDIES TO COME
   Costs of newborn care
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News: Children and Family Supplement is a service provided to the First 5 California by the California State Library. The service features weekly lists of current articles focusing on Children and Family policy. Prior lists can be viewed from the California State Library's Web site at www.library.ca.gov/CRB/SITN/.

How to Obtain Materials Listed in SITN:

  • When available on the Internet, the URL for the full-text of each item is provided.

  • California State Employees may contact the State Information & Reference Center (916-654-0206; cslsirc@library.ca.gov) with the SITN issue number and the item number [S#].

  • All other interested individuals should contact their local library - the items may be available there, or may be borrowed by your local library on your behalf.

The following studies are currently on hand:

ECONOMY

CHILDREN

Benefits For All: The Economic Impact of the New Jersey Child Care Industry Infant/Toddler, Preschool and Out-of-School Time Programs. By Brentt Brown and Saskia Traill, Ph.D., National Economic Development and Law Center. (The John S. Watson Institute for Public Policy of Thomas Edison State College, Trenton, New Jersey) 2006. 81 p.

Full Text at: www.tesc.edu/aboutus/watson/ecoimpact.pdf

["Public preschools and the child care industry pumped $2.55 billion into New Jersey's economy last year, according to a study that urged lawmakers and business owners to make services better and more affordable. The New Jersey Child Care Economic Impact Council produced the first analysis of the industry in an effort to call attention to its contributions and needs. Child care centers, preschools and after-school programs have created 65,300 full-time jobs, making it a bigger employer than other major industries in the state -- including transportation, warehousing and telecommunications. Families and employers would be better served by the industry if there were more quality infant and toddler programs, and better-paid and -qualified administrators, teachers and providers, the study said. It noted the average child care worker earned only $16,900 in 2000, below the poverty line for nearly all families." Newark Star-Ledger (March 1, 2006) Online.]

[Request #S61001]

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EDUCATION

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

Pre-K and Politics 2005. By Jennifer V. Doctors. (Pre-K Now, Washington, DC) 2006. 20 p.

Full Text at: www.preknow.org/documents/AnnualReport_Mar2006.pdf

["Using its 'political barometer,' Pre-K Now examines the climate in the states for pre-k programs, and states’ diverse approaches to helping more children get ready to learn. This concise report examines the good, the not-so-good, and the slow-to-move state efforts, and surveys political support, funding, advocacy, business and civic leadership, media coverage, and other areas of development." Connect for Kids (March 6, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S61002]

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HEAD START

Head Start Cuts Crime In Oregon. By Stephanie Schaefer and others. (Fight Crime Invest in Kids Oregon, Beaverton, Oregon) 2006. 16 p.

Full Text at: www.fightcrime.org/reports/orheadstart.pdf

["Over 10,000 violent crimes are committed and more than 30,000 Oregon kids are arrested each year in Oregon. Research analyzed in the report shows dramatic reductions in future crime when at-risk kids attend Head Start or other quality preschool programs. One national survey of Head Start graduates found that adults who attended Head Start as children were nearly 10 percent less likely to be arrested or charged with a crime than their siblings who did not attend Head Start. Yet, the crime prevention benefits of Head Start are lost on many Oregon children. Due to lack of funding, two out of five eligible at-risk 3- and 4-year-olds, or 6,500 preschoolers, are left out of Oregon Head Start Prekindergarten classrooms. State officials estimate that the recent one percent federal budget cut that is retroactive to October could cut as many as 200 more at-risk kids from Head Start."]

[Request #S61003]

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PRESCHOOL EDUCATION

"Many Happy Returns: Early Childhood Programs Entail Costs, But the Paybacks Could Be Substantial." By Lynn A. Karoly. IN: Rand Review, vol. 29 no. 3 (Fall 2005) pp. 10-15.

["Well designed early childhood interventions have been found to generate short and long-term benefits to participating children and families in multiple domains of well-being.... Public awareness needs to be raised about this matter. Many factors beyond congnitive growth are essential for healthy child development and school readiness."]

[Request #S61004]

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HEALTH

AUTISM

Autism and Hope. By The Brookings Institution and The Help Group. Conference Report. (The Institution, Washington, DC) January 2006. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.brookings.edu/comm/conferencereport/20051216autism.pdf

["As many as one in 200 children have autism or a related development disorder. And while early intervention for autism spectrum disorders has become much more effective, treatments are generally unaffordable and thus inaccessible for some 90 percent of the country's affected children. This recent conference examined policy proposals."]

[Request #S61005]

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CHILDREN

Studying and Tracking Early Child Development from a Health Perspective: A Review of Available Data Sources. By Brett Brown, Child Trends, and others. (The Commonwealth Fund, New York, New York) February 2006. 58 p.

Full Text at: www.cmwf.org/usr_doc/888_Brown_studying_tracking_early_child_dev.pdf

["Over the last several decades, there has been a substantial increase in interest among the pediatric health policy and practitioner communities in moving beyond narrow medical models of health to promote more broadly the development of very young children including their social, emotional, intellectual, and physical well-being. In this report, we review existing national data sources in terms of their capacity to inform child health policy and practice in their efforts to promote early child development. The body of the report provides an overview of existing areas of strength, identifies gaps, and makes recommendations for future data development. Some 26 national surveys and administrative data sources are assessed for their collective ability to support research and for their adequacy as sources of descriptive social indicator data. Equally important, and perhaps even more useful for those who wish to analyze existing public data, we provide an appendix summarizing the content of the 26 surveys and administrative databases."]

[Request #S61006]

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Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems that Spend Smarter: Maximizing Resources to Serve Vulnerable Children. By Kay Johnson and Jane Knitzer, National Center for Children in Poverty. (The Center, New York, New York) February 2006. 24 p.

Full Text at: nccp.org/media/PTbrief1.pdf

["This first Project THRIVE Issue Brief looks through the lens of state Early Childhood Care Systems grant projects to identify ways in which they can promote smarter spending for vulnerable young children as they plan for and implement new, more integrated systems. It has a special focus on promoting social and emotional health and well-being, which is a critical precursor to both later health and school readiness. The emphasis is on planning for better financing and maximizing existing resources in implementing systems change. This analysis will help state officials, community leaders, and advocates take action to ensure the healthy development of children and their families."]

[Request #S61007]

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Healthy Families Facts and Figures: Coverage for Low-income Children in California. By California HealthCare Foundation. (The Foundation, Oakland, California) January 2006. 25 p.

Full Text at: www.chcf.org/topics/download.cfm?pg=policy&fn=HealthyFamiliesFactsAndFigures2006%2Epdf&pid=448690&itemid=117986

["This annual primer is on California’s State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP). Information on county-based health insurance initiatives for kids is new to the primer this year; the publication reports that twenty-two counties already have such an initiative."]

[Request #S61008]

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INFANTS

Preconception Care Fact Sheet. By The Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. (The Association, Washington, DC) February 2006. 2 p.

Full Text at: www.astho.org/pubs/FactSheet-PreconceptionCare-FINAL.pdf

["Preconception Care Fact Sheet addresses the need to promote women's health before conception and presents the many opportunities that exist for states to improve women's and children's overall health. The fact sheet, produced by the Association of State and Territorial Health Officers with support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, provides examples of preconception interventions and strategies states may consider to reduce infant and maternal mortality and morbidity and improve women's overall health. A list of resources is also provided." MCH Alert (March 3, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S61009]

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HUMAN SERVICES

CHILD CARE

Caring for Children of Color: The Child Care Patterns of White, Black, and Hispanic Children. By Jeffrey Capizzano, Teaching Strategies, Inc. and others. (The Urban Institute, Washington, DC) February 2006. 55 p.

Full Text at: www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/311285_OP-72.pdf

["This report examines child care arrangements by different child and family characteristics. The findings suggest that white children drive national child care patterns, masking different patterns among black and Hispanic children."]

[Request #S61010]

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CHILDREN

Beyond Common Sense: Child Welfare, Child Well-being and the Evidence for Policy Reform. By Fred Wulczyn and others. (AldineTransaction, New Brunswick, New Jersey) 2005. 227 p.

["In this book, the authors examine the use of child well-being as an outcome for children involved with the child welfare system. Prior to the Adoption and Safe Families Act (ASFA) of 1997, safety and permanency were the two primary outcomes used to judge whether the child welfare system was fulfilling its responsibilities. Since ASFA, however, well-being has moved closer to the center of the debate guiding child welfare reform." NOTE: Beyond Common Sense...is available for loan.]

[Request #S61011]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

HEALTH

INFANTS

"Costs of Newborn Care in California: A Population-based Study." By Susan K. Schmitt, PhD, and others. IN: Pediatrics, vol. 117, no. 1 (January 2006) pp. 154-160.

["We sought to describe the current costs of newborn care by using population-based data, which includes linked vital statistics and hospital records for both mothers and infants. These data allow costs to be reported by episode of care (birth), instead of by hospitalization.... Conclusions. The very smallest infants make up a hugely disproportionate share of costs; more than half of all neonatal costs are incurred by low birth weight or premature infants. Maternal costs are similar in magnitude to newborn costs, but they are much less skewed than for infants. Preventing premature deliveries could yield very large cost savings, in addition to saving lives."]

[Request #S61012]

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