Subject: Studies in the News 06-02 (January 10, 2006)


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News


California -- One Hundred and Fifty Years Ago

January 8 1856 - "Borax was discovered by Dr. John Veatch in Tuscan Springs, California. It became a multi-use product that was popularized during the era of TV's Death Valley Days and 20 Mule Team Borax. "  http://home.hiwaay.net/~dbennett/tiowhjan.html  

January 9, 1856 - "The day before the inauguration of Governor-elect J. Neely Johnson was occasion for a combined parade of the militia, followed by exhibition drills by the different companies. On the inaugural day the California Guard with seven other militia companies paraded to Governor-elect Johnson's s home on F Street and escorted him to the Capitol for the inaugural ceremonies. "  www.militarymuseum.org/1st%20CA%20Guard.html  

Contents This Week

Introductory Material CALIFORNIA READER
   Concerns over San Joaquin Valley
   Great Valley residents struggling
CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT
   Crime statistics
   Youth prison plans
   Problems in prison rehabilitation
   Violence against women
CULTURE AND SOCIETY
   Discrimination on religious grounds
   Unauthorized immigrants
DEMOGRAPHY
   An aging and more diverse California
ECONOMY
   Housing expected to cool
   U.S. exports to China
   Film industry revenues
   Video game restrictions
   Minimum wage in restaurant industry
   Minimum wage economics
   Outlook for Bay Area economy
EDUCATION
   Charter schools without classrooms
   High school dropout rates
   Capping support for college presidents
   Higher education in a market-driven era
   Benefits of higher education
   Economic value of the UC
   Intelligent design court decision
ENERGY
   California's biomass ethanol future
   Paying more for less energy
   FERC's response to California crisis
ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES
   Federal food-safety net
   Air pollution generated by cargo industry
   Court allows border fence
   CalFed proposes reform
   CalFed stakeholder survey
   Water agencies urge more dams
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
   Recall petitions must be bilingual
   Women candidates in Assembly districts
   Infrastructure investment plan
   Equitable Infrastructure
   Infrastructure needs and tradeoffs
   Design-build construction delivery
   State of the State address and briefing
HEALTH
   Hundreds of harmful man-made chemicals
   Employer health benefits survey
   Health insurance among immigrants
   Concern over prescription benefits
   States facilitating importation of medicines
   Increase prescription drug prices
   Common cold and cool feet
HOUSING
   Preserving affordable housing
   Guide for affordable housing
INSURANCE
   Racial variation in car insurance
TRANSPORTATION
   Cell phones and highway safety
   Vehicle license fee adjustment
STUDIES TO COME
   Arts in education
   Permafrost melting
   Health system improvement
   Movies affect teen smoking
   SUVs' child safety record
Studies in the News is a very current compilation of items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau to supplement the public policy debate in California’s Capitol. To help share the latest information with state policymakers, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library’s website. This week's list of current articles in various public policy areas is presented below.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • California State Employees may contact the State Information & Reference Center (916-654-0206; cslsirc@library.ca.gov) with the SITN issue number and the item number [S#].

  • All other interested individuals should contact their local library - the items may be available there, or may be borrowed by your local library on your behalf.

The following studies are currently on hand:

CALIFORNIA READER

California’s San Joaquin Valley: A Region in Transition. By Tadlock Cowan, Rural and Regional Development Policy Resources, Congressional Research Service, (The Service, Washington, DC) December 12, 2005. 365 p.

Full Text at: www.house.gov/cardoza/San_Joaquin_Valley_CRS_Report.pdf

["A new congressional study suggests the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) may be the new Appalachia. Poverty is high, education is low and social needs abound.... In addition to examining socioeconomic conditions in the SJV, the report provides analysis of water supply and quality issues especially those concerning agriculture, air quality concerns, and rail and shipping issues." Sacramento Bee (December 15, 2005) A1.]

[Request #S60201]

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San Joaquin Valley Land, People, and Economy. By Kenneth Umbach. California Research Bureau, California State Library (The California State Library, Sacramento, California) November 2005. 145 p.

Full Text at: www.library.ca.gov/crb/05/07/05-007.pdf

["Rapid Growth Keeps Valley Challenged: The San Joaquin Valley's population is growing fast and facing considerable challenges. Since 2000, more than 427,000 people have moved to the Valley, equal to almost the entire population of Fresno, and its population will continue to climb in coming decades. As it grows, the Valley continues to struggle with high poverty rates, low higher-education attainment and poor air and water quality, states the report." Sacramento Bee (November 22, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S60202]

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CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT

CRIME RATES

Report to the Nation: 2005. By Office for Victims of Crime, U.S. Department of Justice. (The Department, Washington, DC) 2005. 64 p.

["The initiatives focus on providing victims with greater access to justice through the enforcement of federal laws, representation of individual rights, and efforts to prevent, reduce, and control cime."]

[Request #S60203]

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JUVENILE JUSTICE

Status Report on Juvenile Justice Reform. By the Juvenile Justice Division, California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitations. (The Department, Sacramento, California) December 1, 2005.

["The division would emphasize smaller living units for youth offenders and treatment options for all of the state's wards. The division also would pursue new buildings to replace older prisons designed for large populations. The plans were mandated by a court agreement and the Legislature after the Juvenile Justice Division came under fire for maintaining dangerous prisons with inhumane conditions.... Critics of the state's $436 million youth prison system attacked its latest reform package as woefully lacking in detail and demanded a major overhaul." Sacramento Bee (December 6, 2005) A3.]

Report. Various pagings.
http://www.cya.ca.gov/about/statrpt_jj.html

Executive Summary. 13 p.
http://www.cya.ca.gov/about/dec1report/1_exec_summary.pdf

[Request #S60204]

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PRISONS & PRISONERS

California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation: The Intermediate Sanction Programs Lacked Performance Benchmarks and Were Plagued With Implementation Problems. By California State Auditor, Bureau of State Audits, Bureau of State Audits. (The Auditor, Sacramento, California) November 2005. 63 p.

Full Text at: www.bsa.ca.gov/pdfs/reports/2005-111.pdf

["This report concludes that the department did not establish performance benchmarks or analyze available data for the intermediate sanction programs. As a result, the department was unable to determine whether the benefits it intended to achieve outweighed the risk to public safety the intermediate sanction programs posed."]

[Request #S60205]

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WOMEN

“Violence Against Women.” By Claudia Garcia-Moreno and others. IN: Science, vol. 310 no. 5752. (November 2005) pp. 1282-1283.

[“There is growing evidence from research that suggests that violence against women is highly prevalent, with an estimated one in three women globally experiencing some form of victimization in childhood, adolescence, or adulthood. This violence has a direct economic impact along with the human and emotional costs. A study in the USA estimates the cost of intimate partner rape, physical assault and stalking as exceeding $5.8 billion each year, nearly $4.1 billion of which is direct medical and mental health care services.”]

[Request #S60206]

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CULTURE AND SOCIETY

GAYS & LESBIANS

North Coast Women's Care Medical Group, et al. v. Superior Court of San Diego County. California Court of Appeal, Fourth Appellate District. D045438. December 2, 2005. 21 p.

Full Text at: www.courtinfo.ca.gov/opinions/documents/D045438.PDF

["A state appeals court ruled that two fertility doctors had the right to refuse to artificially inseminate a lesbian based on her marital status because it would have violated their religious beliefs. The ruling reversed a lower court decision.... An attorney for a gay rights group said the decision would be appealed to the California Supreme Court out of concern that the ruling could encourage other discrimination against gays and lesbians on religious grounds." Los Angeles Times (December 3, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S60207]

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IMMIGRATION

Undocumented Immigrants: An Annotated Bibliography. By Alicia Bugarin and others, California Research Bureau. California State Library. (The Bureau, Sacramento, California) 2005. 21 p.

Full Text at: www.library.ca.gov/crb/05/06/05-006.pdf

["The annotated bibliography lists recent research concerning the size of the unauthorized immigrant population (in California and the United States) as well as the costs and benefits of providing services to both illegal and legal immigrants.... The accompanying briefing note shows the distribution of unauthorized immigrants across regions and counties in 2000 and 2005, sorted by the share of illegal immigrants allocated to each county. About 75 percent of these unauthorized immigrants were residing in the Southern California region. Other regions with large concentrations were the San Joaquin Valley (10.9 percent), the Bay Area (7.6 percent), and the Central Coast (4.7 percent)."]

[Request #S60208]

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DEMOGRAPHY

CALIFORNIA

Planning for California's Future: The State's Population is Growing and Aging and Becoming More Diverse. By California Budget Project. (The Project, Sacramento, California) November 2005. 9 p

Full Text at: www.cbp.org/2005/0511_demographics.pdf

["California's population is not only growing, it's growing older and more diverse -- demographic shifts that will challenge state and local budgets, The report ... shows a state faced with an urgent need to prepare to care for its aging population while at the same time getting more young people educated and ready for the work force." Sacramento Bee (November 23, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S60209]

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ECONOMY

The UCLA Anderson Forecast for the Nation and California. By the UCLA Anderson Forecasting Project, Anderson Graduate School of Management. And Quarterly Business Forecast Seminar: Packet. By Ed Leamer, Anderson Graduate School of Management, and others. (The School, Los Angeles, California) December 2005. Various pagings.

["The California economy will probably experience sluggish growth in 2006 but should avoid a recession if, as expected, housing prices cool without crashing. The state forecast mirrors similar projections for the United States, though California has benefited disproportionately from the housing boom and thus may be more vulnerable to a slowdown.... The forecast notes that regardless of what happens with home prices and construction employment -- the twin pillars now propping up both the state and national economies -- hiring has been so sluggish in other sectors, like manufacturing, that a slowdown in real estate is unlikely by itself to spark the widespread job losses that characterize a recession." San Francisco Chronicle (December 7, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S60210]

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EXPORTS

U.S. Exports, Investment, Affiliate Sales Rising, but Export Share Falling. By the U.S. Government Accountability Office. (The Office, Washington, DC) December 2005. 75 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-06-162

["China is important to the global eonomy and a major U.S. trading partner.... While U.S.-Chinese commercial relations have expanded, controversies have emerged, including the size and growth of the U.S. trade deficit with China, China's lack of intellectual property protection, and China's implementation of its WTO obligations.... GAO assessed how U.S. exports to China have fared against those of other major trading partners."]

[Request #S60211]

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MEDIA INDUSTRY

Film Industry Profile of California/Los Angeles County. By Jack Kyser and George Huang, Los Angeles County Economic Development Corporation. (The Corporation, Los Angeles, California) November 29, 2005. 20 p.

Full Text at: laedc.info/pdf/Film-2005.pdf

["Studios are beginning to cut jobs in anticipation of a slowdown in DVD revenues that have been so lucrative in recent years. To stem the outflow, industry backers pushed for a state bill that would offer as much as $100 million in annual tax breaks to keep film productions in California." Los Angeles Times (November 29, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S60212]

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Entertainment Software Association, et al. v. Rod Blagojevich, et al. U.S. District Court, Northern District of Illinois. 05-C-4265. December 2, 2005. Various pagings

["Federal Court Strikes Down Video Game Restrictions: The judge said that [the Illinois law] would interfere with the First Amendment and that there wasn't a compelling enough reason, such as preventing imminent violence, to allow that.... This year, other states approved similar legislation after hidden sex scenes were discovered in a popular game, 'Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas.' California's version, set to go into effect Jan. 1, is among those being challenged in court." Associated Press (December 3, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S60213]

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MINIMUM WAGE

Economics of the San Francisco Restaurant Industry: 2005. By Kent Sims. (Golden Gate Restaurant Association, San Francisco, California) 2005. 170 p.

Full Text at: www.ggra.org/upload/images/Ec%20Study%202005/Ec%20Study%2005.pdf

["Survey respondents report the 28% increase in the minimum wage the City began implementing in February 2004 has lifted their average total cost of employees by 10%. Since the cost of employees is more than 60% of prime costs at most restaurants, this is a seismic shift and the money has to come from somewhere in this very thin margin industry: 98% of respondents have increased menu prices; 54% have decreased their number of employees; 35% have decreased the provision of employee benefits; 91% had lower profits; and 76% suffered a decrease in the market value of their businesses."]

[Request #S60214]

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The Economics of Citywide Minimum Wages: The San Francisco Model. By Michael Reich and others. UC Berkeley Institute of Industrial Relations. (The Institute, Berkeley California) January 2006. 12 p.

Full Text at: www.iir.berkeley.edu/research/sfminimumwage.pdf

["A 2-year-old city law that boosted San Francisco's minimum wage -- from $6.75 an hour in 2003 to $8.82 this year -- hasn't hurt the city's economy or its businesses.... A gradual rise in San Francisco's minimum wage hadn't spurred layoffs or business failures, although advocates for local businesses most affected by the law say they are feeling a financial pinch." San Francisco Chronicle (January 4, 2006) B1.]

[Request #S60215]

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U.S. ECONOMY

The U.S Economy: 2005 in Review and Prospects for 2006. By Janet L. Yellen, President and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. (The Bank, San Francisco, California) December 2, 2005. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.frbsf.org/news/speeches/2005/1202.html

["The national economy is firing on all cylinders, and the Bay Area economy has begun to chug at a faster pace, a top official said .... She also believes inflation remains confined to its cage, although hazards still lurk because of the uncertain trend in energy prices." Contra Costa Times (December 2, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S60216]

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EDUCATION

CHARTER SCHOOLS

Nonclassroom-based Charter Schools in California and the Impact of SB 740. By Cassabdra Guarino and others, RAND. (RAND, Santa Monica, California) 2005. 121 p.

Full Text at: www.rand.org/pubs/monographs/2005/RAND_MG323.pdf

["This report is concerned specifically with the impact of a particular piece of legislation and its associated regulatory process on nonclassroom-based charter schools in the state of California and is thus of particular interest to education policymakers in California, it also offers general insights regarding this relatively new and underresearched type of public school that may serve to inform a broad audience of policymakers, educators, and the general public interested in the field of public education."]

[Request #S60217]

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DROPOUT RATES

High School Dropouts, Enrollment, and Graduation Rates in California. By Patricia de Cos, California Research Bureau, California State Library. (CRB, Sacramento, California) November 2005. 63 p.

Full Text at: www.library.ca.gov/crb/05/08/05-008.pdf

["This report examines the various definitions for high school dropouts and graduates used by the California Department of Education and five studies that have examined graduation rates for California, including for several large school districts. The report further compiles statewide data on high school enrollment by race and ethnicity, and provides details on enrollment data for the 10 largest school districts in the state."]

[Request #S60218]

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HIGHER EDUCATION

Capping Support for College Presidents. By Christine Walton, National Confercence of State Legislatures. NCSL Legisbrief. Vol. 13, No. 2. (NCSL, Denver, Colorado) 2005. 2 p.

["In the past two years, many states have been forced to cut higher education budgets, raise tuition, freeze faculty salaries, and dismantle university programs to deal with the economic downturn and budget deficits. At the same time, college presidents' salaries have steadily increased.... Many argue that these dollars could be used more efficiently to protect programs, lower tuition and create additional aid and scholarships for students."]

[Request #S60219]

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Correcting Course: How We Can Restore the Ideals of Public Higher Education in a Market-Driven Era. By Lara Couturier and Jamie Scurry, The Futures Project. (The Project, Providence, Rhode Island) 2005. 15 p.

Full Text at: www.futuresproject.org/publications/Correcting_Course.pdf

["Colleges and universities are under growing pressure to cut costs, measure performance, and compete more strenuously for students, grants, funding, and prestige. In order to survive in this changing environment, many institutions have been forced to risk their long-standing dedication to core functions.... Increasingly, state policies have come to favor an open market that has the potential to create the kind of unhealthy competition that does not necessarily lead to increased access, better instruction, lower costs, or greater efficiency. The outcome is that higher education is becoming much more competition-driven in many arenas."]

[Request #S60220]

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Education Pays Update. By College Board. (The Board, New York, New York) 2005. 12 p.

Full Text at: www.collegeboard.com/prod_downloads/press/cost05/education_pays_05.pdf

["This supplement includes information on some of the benefits of higher education: 1) higher earnings and tax payments associated with higher levels of educational attainment; 2) differences in employee benefits by level of education; 3) differences in health related behavior patterns by level of education.... The indicators confirm if educational opportunities were equally available to all individuals and groups, our society would be both more equitable and more efficient, enjoying more of the benefits described in this report."]

[Request #S60221]

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"Return on Investment: Educational Choices and Demographic Change in California's Future." By Henry Brady and others. University of California, Berkeley, Survey Research Center. (The Center, Berkeley, California) November 30, 2005. 129 p.

Full Text at: ucdata.berkeley.edu:7101/new_web/pubs/Return_On_Investment_Final_Report.pdf

["California's college-age population is growing, and if the state doesn't invest more money in higher education and financial aid, it's going to have greater numbers of people in jail, living in poverty and jobless. The study, commissioned by the bipartisan Campaign for College Opportunity, breaks down the financial cost of doing nothing in light of changing demographics -- as well as the financial benefits of taking action now. As a general rule, the study found that for every new dollar the state spends on community colleges, public universities and student financial aid, it will receive $3. Conversely, for every dollar California doesn't spend, it will have a net loss of two tax dollars." San Francisco Chronicle (December 1, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S60222]

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RELIGION

Tammy Kitzmiller et al v. Dover Area School District. United States District Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania. 4:04-cv-02688-JEJ. 139 p.

Full Text at: www.pamd.uscourts.gov/kitzmiller/kitzmiller_342.pdf

["In a broad and withering opinion, a federal judge ruled that intelligent design was nothing more than creationism in disguise and therefore that it was unconstitutional to teach it in a public-school science classroom. The judge took proponents of intelligent design to task saying that they wished to 'change the ground rules of science to make room for religion, specifically, beliefs consonant with a particular version of Christianity.' He also chastised the former members of the Dover Area School Board who insisted that teachers in the Pennsylvania district present intelligent design as a legitimate alternative to the widely accepted principles of biological evolution laid down by Charles Darwin nearly 150 years ago. 'It is ironic that several of these individuals, who so staunchly and proudly touted their religious convictions in public, would time and again lie to cover their tracks and disguise the real purpose behind the intelligent design policy.'" Chronicle of Higher Education (December 20, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S60223]

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ENERGY

ALTERNATIVE FUELS

Brief on Biomass and Cellulosic Ethanol. By Rosa Maria Moller, California Research Bureau, California State Library. (CRB, Sacramento, California) December 2005. 33 p.

Full Text at: democrats.sen.ca.gov/articlefiles/4712-final%20paper%20on%20biomass.doc

["Provides information on: 1) the availability of biomass, 2) potential for cellulosic ethanol production in California, and 3) federal and state policies that support the use of biomass, particularly for ethanol production. This brief also includes information gathered through conversations with representatives of the ethanol industry and representatives from government agencies."]

[Request #S60254]

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ENERGY CONSERVATION

Effects of Energy Costs on U.S. Adults. By Jean Kalata. Prepared for the American Association of Retired Persons. (The Association, Washington, D.C.) November 2005. 9 p.

Full Text at: assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/consume/energy_costs.pdf

["Almost two-thirds of American adults have limited the use of energy in their homes as a result of higher energy costs.... Sixteen percent of respondents have delayed payment of bills as a result of increased energy costs. Some are limiting food (15%) telecommunications (15%) and medical services (11%)."]

[Request #S60224]

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UTILITIES

The Commission’s Response to the California Electricity Crisis and Timeline for Distribution of Refunds. By the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. Prepared for the U. S. Congress. (The Commission, Washington, DC) December 27, 2005. 26 p.

Full Text at: www.ferc.gov/legal/staff-reports/comm-response.pdf

["The condition of electricity markets and the grid through which power is distributed in California 'remains vulnerable.' Since the power crisis ended in June 2001, the California Independent Service Operator had to shut off power to groups of customers 12 times.... The report drew instant criticism from the state and from consumer advocates, who saw it as self-serving. They said the commission blamed everyone for the crisis except itself, when it was slow to respond initially and slower still in getting refunds to California ratepayers hit by the price gouging." Sacramento Bee (December 30, 2005) D1.]

[Request #S60225]

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ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES

AGRICULTURE

Outbreak Alert! Closing the Gaps in Our Federal Food-safety Net. By Center for Science in the Public Interest. (The Center, Washington, DC) November 2005. 23 p.

Full Text at: www.cspinet.org/new/pdf/outbreakalert2005.pdf

["Contaminated fruits and vegetables are causing more food-borne illness among Americans than raw chicken or eggs, consumer advocates said in a report. Common sources of food illnesses include various bacteria such as salmonella and E.coli that can infect humans and animals then make their way into manure used to fertilize plants. The practice of using manure fertilizer is more common in Latin America, which has become a growing source of fresh produce for the United States.... Center for Science in the Public Interest officials urged federal regulators to do more to protect the nation's food supply." Associated Press (November 23, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S60226]

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AIR POLLUTION

Emission Reduction Plan for Ports and International Goods Movement: Draft. By the Staff of the California Air Resources Board. (The Board, Sacramento, California) December 1, 2005.

["Air pollutants generated by California's cargo industry will result in about 750 premature deaths this year and tens of billions of dollars in related healthcare costs over the next 15 years.... The report is the first of its kind to document and assess the illnesses linked to freight movement in California. It also proposes a wide-ranging $3-billion to $6-billion pollution-reduction plan through 2020, including requiring diesel-electric hybrid engines and cleaner-burning fuels." Los Angeles Times (December 3, 2005) 1.]

Report. Various pagings.
http://www.arb.ca.gov/planning/gmerp/gmerp.htm

Executive Summary. 11 p.
http://www.arb.ca.gov/planning/gmerp/dec1plan/exec_summary.pdf

[Request #S60227]

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HABITAT PROTECTION

Sierra Club, et al. v. John Ashcroft, et al. U.S. District Court, Southern District of California. 04CV0272. December 13, 2005. 17 p.

["A judge lifted the final legal barrier to completing a border fence meant to thwart illegal immigrants in the southwestern corner of the U.S.... In September, Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff waived all laws and legal challenges to building the final 3 1/2-mile leg through coastal wetlands to the Pacific Ocean. The Sierra Club and other environmental groups had argued that Chertoff lacked the authority to do what he did. But the judge said Congress delegated such authority to Chertoff in June. He noted that the executive branch already had significant jurisdiction over national security and immigration." Associated Press (December 13, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S60228]

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WATER POLICY

CalFed Bay-Delta Program: 10-Year Action Plan Framework: Final Draft. By the CalFed Bay-Delta Authority. (The Authority, Sacramento, California) December 15, 2005. 14 p.

Full Text at: www.calwater.ca.gov/CBDA/AgendaItems_12-20-05/Meeting_Materials_12-20-05.pdf

["The CalFed board voted to reconstitute itself under the umbrella of the California Water Commission, which was created in 1958 but has been dormant in recent years.... CalFed also agreed that its existing 70 employees would be reassigned to a new unit within the state Resources Agency, where they would continue to serve CalFed goals.... The board also voted to establish a separate 'executive leadership council,' chaired by the state secretary of resources and an appointee of the U.S. Secretary of Interior. This entity will set overarching policy and ensure that the revived Water Commission stays on track to meet the original CalFed goals." Sacramento Bee (December 21, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S60229]

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CalFed Interview and Survey Findings Report. By KPMG Risk Advisory Services. (CalFed Bay-Delta Autority, Sacramento, California) 2005. 35 p.

Full Text at: calwater.ca.gov/Revitalizing_CALFED/KPMG_CALFED_Survey_10-17-05.pdf

["A key part of KPMG’s independent program review was to identify and assess CALFED Program stakeholder priorities and expectations and attain an understanding of their interactions with the CALFED Program and California Bay Delta Authority. The purpose of the stakeholder outreach was to identify and gain a better understanding of stakeholder attitudes, expectations, and priorities related to the CALFED Program."]

[Request #S60230]

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WATER SUPPLY

No Time to Waste: A Blueprint for California Water. By the Association of California Water Agencies. (The Association, Sacramento, California) May 2005.

["California hasn't built a major reservoir in decades, and its most important reservoir by far -- the Sierra Nevada snowpack -- is in danger of shrinking because of global warming. Water agencies say those facts, coupled with projected population increases, mean that it is time for the state to get serious about building new dams.... The report called for new surface and ground water storage, increased pumping capacity out of the Delta, relaxation of Endangered Species Act requirements for development of new water infrastructure and a comprehensive re-evaluation of the Delta's viability, among other things." Contra Costa Times (December 29, 2005) 1.]

Report. 56 p.
http://www.acwa.com/issues/blueprint/blueprint.pdf

Executive Summary. 12 p.
http://www.acwa.com/issues/blueprint/blueprint_exec_summ.pdf

[Request #S60231]

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GENERAL GOVERNMENT

ELECTIONS

Sandra Padilla, et al. v. Rosalyn Lever, et al. U.S. Court of Appeals, Ninth Circuit. 03-56259. November 23, 2005. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.ca9.uscourts.gov/ca9/newopinions.nsf/1CC1857ADC92685D882570C100795CAA/$file/0356259.pdf?openelement

["Petitions used to put the recall of a Santa Ana school board trustee on a 2003 election ballot should have been written in both Spanish and English, the court ruled.... The court said 'there was sufficient state involvement to trigger the bilingual requirements' in the Voting Rights Act. The ruling noted that the registrar's office certified the English-only recall petition as conforming to California election laws." Los Angeles Times (November 24, 2005) B1.]

[Request #S60232]

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LEGISLATURE

The California Assembly: Not “Safe” for Women? By Catherine Hazelton. (University of California, Berkeley, California) 2005. 44 p.

Full Text at: repositories.cdlib.org/igs/igspp/2005-1/

["All six incumbent assemblymembers targeted by Democrats and Republicans for electoral elimination in ... fall (2004) were women. Statistically, there is less than a one in one thousand chance that all six of the targeted incumbents would be women.... Since at least 1992, women have been more likely to run for competitive seats in the California assembly than seats that are safe for their party.... This paper examines why this has been true over the last seven election cycles (1992-2004) and how these findings affect women candidates and legislators."]

[Request #S60233]

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PUBLIC INFRASTRUCTURE FINANCE

Smart Investments, 2006: Five Keys to Smart Investment in California's Future. By Phil Angelides, California State Treasurer. (The Treasurer, Sacramento, California) December 2005.

["In a new report the Treasurer outlined five principles to guide the development of any plan to ensure that state investments expand economic opportunity, preserve the environment, and protect California’s schools, colleges, and children. 'We must invest in our state’s infrastructure and we must do it the right way,' said (California State Treaurer Phil Angelides." Press Release (December 20, 2005)]

Smart Investments. 10 p.
http://www.treasurer.ca.gov/publications/smartinvest/dec2005.pdf

Press Release. 3 p.
http://www.treasurer.ca.gov/news/releases/2005/20051220_smart.pdf

[Request #S60234]

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Understanding Equitable Infrastructure Investment for California. By Manuel Pastor, Jr. and Deborah Reed, Public Policy Institute of California. (The Institute, San Francisco, California) 2005. 74 p.

Full Text at: www.ppic.org/content/pubs/OP_605MPOP.pdf

["This report provides a broad overview of equity issues in infrastructure investments in California. In order to illustrate the nature and extent of equity concerns [this report focuses] on four major areas of infrastructure: transportation, K-12 education, higher education, and water resources."]

[Request #S60235]

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Sizing Up the Challenge: California's Infrastructure Needs and Tradeoffs. By Ellen Hanak and Elisa Banbour, Public Policy Institute of California. (The Institute, San Francisco, California) 2005. 118 p.

Full Text at: www.ppic.org/content/pubs/OP_605EHOP.pdf

["Since the mid-1990s, a number of reports have argued that California is jeopardizing its future by investing too little on basic public infrastructure. [The authors] revisit this question, with a focus on three main sectors -– schools, water, and transportation."]

[Request #S60236]

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Design-Build: An Alernative Construction System. By Paul Guyer, Legislative Analyst's Office. (The Office, Sacramento, California) 2005. 16 p.

Full Text at: www.lao.ca.gov/2005/design_build/design_build_020305.pdf

["In this report, [the authors] look at ... the advantages and disadvantages of the design-build method compared to the traditional design-bid-build method.... [The authors] make recommendations for statutory changes to provide that option while preserving the public's confidence."]

[Request #S60237]

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STATE OF THE STATE

State of the State Address. By California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger. (The Office of the Governor, Sacramento, California) January 5, 2006.

["Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger used his State of the State address to call for a plan that would spend $222.6 billion from a variety of sources over 10 years on projects ranging from schools and roads to levees and jails." Sacramento Bee (January 6, 2006) A13.]

Speech. Various pagings.
speech

Press Release. Various pagings.
press release

Brifing Packet. 23 p.
packet

[Request #S60238]

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HEALTH

ENVIRONMENTAL TOXINS

"Hundreds of Man-Made Chemicals: In Our Air, Our Water, and Our Food Could Be Damaging the Most Basic Building Blocks of Human Development." By Gay Daly. IN: OnEarth, vol. 27, no. 4 (Winter 2006) pp. 21-27.

["Before World War II, only a few synthetic chemicals -- laboratory-made compounds that do not exist in nature -- had been invented. With the onset of the war, chemists eager to help their countries achieve victory began inventing plastics, pesticide solvents, degreasers, insulators, and other materials that could be used to make more effective weapons, increase crop yields, and feed more soldiers."]

[Request #S60239]

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HEALTH INSURANCE

California Employer Health Benefits Survey. By California HealthCare Foundation. (The Foundation, Oakland, California) 2005. 39 p.

['Employer-based coverage is the primary source of health insurance in California and the nation. The percentage of employers offering health benefits, the way those benefits are designed, how much they cost, and the amounts paid for benefits by employees all have major implications for the level of access to and quality of health insurance for millions of Californians.

[Request #S60240]

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INSURANCE

"Legal Status And Health Insurance Among Immigrants." By Dana P. Goldman. IN: Health Affairs, vol. 24 no. 6 (November/December 2005) pp. 1640-1653.

["The increase in the number of people without health insurance has occurred largely because of illegal immigration, a study found.... The number of uninsured adults in the United States grew by about 8.7 million between 1980 and 2000. If the trend for Los Angeles County held true for the rest of the country, about a third of that growth can be attributable to illegal immigrants.... The study shows that any meaningful impact on reducing the number of uninsured has to take into account the issue of illegal immigration." Associated Press (November 11, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S60241]

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PRESCRIPTION DRUGS

"The New Math: Cheaper than Canada? The Drug Benefit May be the Better Deal." By Patricia Barry. IN: AARP Bulletin, (January 2006) online.

Full Text at: www.aarp.org/bulletin/medicare/new_math.html

["In a move that is already attracting criticism from some lawmakers, AARP last week softened its support of drug reimportation legislation by saying that the new Medicare drug benefit saves senior citizens more than buying pharmaceuticals from Canada.... It concluded that seniors who enroll in a low-cost Medicare prescription-drug plan would save more in drug costs this year than if they were to buy the same drugs in Canada. While Canadian drug prices are still cheaper than prices in the United States, AARP found that when a senior includes all out-of-pocket costs —- premiums, deductibles and payments for medications —- the price is lower." The Hill (January 4, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S60242]

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Canada RX Programs Find Few Takers. By Daniel C. Vock. (Stateline.org, Washington, DC) December 29, 2005. 2 p.

Full Text at: www.stateline.org/live/ViewPage.action?siteNodeId=136&languageId=1&contentId=77136

["Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich and the governors of Wisconsin, Kansas, Vermont and Missouri launched I-Save-Rx. The much-touted program filled only 14,000 prescriptions through arrangements with pharmacies in Canada, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom.... Thousands of Americans are still purchasing brand-name drugs in significant quantities over the Internet from Canada.... The pharmaceutical industry, which has fought drug imports at every turn, claims it blunted the consumer movement with charity programs that make medicines available free or at low cost to those who cannot afford to pay for them."]

[Request #S60243]

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Cost Sharing Cuts Employers' Drug Spending -- But Employees Don't Get the Savings. By RAND. (RAND, Santa Monica, California) 4 p.

["Spending on outpatient prescription drugs has increased at double-digit rates for the past decade and is now the third largest component of health care expenses after hospital care and physician services.... Increasing co-payments causes consumers to use less medication and less expensive drugs. Higher co-payments do cut costs, but most of the savings go to health insurance plans, not to consumers."]

[Request #S60244]

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RESEARCH

"Acute Cooling of the Feet and the Onset of Common Cold Symptoms." By Claire Johnson and Ronald Eccles, Common Cold Centre, Cardiff University, United Kingdom. IN: Family Practice, vol. 22, no. 6 (December 2005) pp. 608-613.

["If your mother always warned you to wrap up warm to avoid catching a cold, it appears she may have been right all along. British scientists say they have proof that a drop in body temperature can kickstart viruses which lie dormant in people during the cold season, from October to March. And getting your feet wet, they found, can triple the risk of developing cold symptoms such as sore throat, sneezing and coughing.... The findings do contradict accepted scientific wisdom which dismisses a link between chilling and viral infection."]

[Request #S60245]

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HOUSING

AFFORDABLE HOUSING

Preserving America's Affordable Housing. By Local Initiatives Support Corporation. (The Courporation, New York, New York) 2005. 16 p.

Full Text at: www.lisc.org/resources/assets/asset_upload_file755_8068.pdf

["This report looks at how America's investment of more than $60 billion in affordable housing is at risk as the original federal assistance agreements expire, and owners are faced with renewal options or conversion to housing for people who can afford higher rents. The report discusses how Local Initiatives Support Center is helping nonprofit community development corporations acquire and preserve housing developments, build partnerships with housing authorities and other organizations, and advocate for government policies that can reduce the loss of affordable homes and apartments."]

[Request #S60246]

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Opportunities for County Government and the Affordable Housing Challenge. By the Center for Sustainable Communities. (National Association of Counties, Washington DC) 2005. 18 p.

Full Text at: content.knowledgeplex.org/kp2/cache/documents/105168.pdf

["The brief profiles ... in this report illustrate ... three of the many different ways counties have utilized existing tools and created new ones to assure that housing is accessible and affordable to as many citizens as possible."]

[Request #S60247]

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INSURANCE

AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE

Good Drivers Living in Predominantly African-American and Latino Zip Codes Charged Higher Premiums. By Consumers Union (The Union, San Francisco, California) December 20, 2005. 2 p.

["In ZIP Code 90045 (Westchester, Los Angeles County), a community that is 52.13 percent non-Hispanic White, Farmers charged this good driver an annual premium of $1,443.00 in 2002. But if she moved across the street into the adjacent ZIP Code 90301 (Inglewood, a community that is 57.25 percent Latino, Farmers charged her $2,342.40, an increase of $899.40, or 62.3 percent. And if she moved instead across the street into the adjacent ZIP Code 90056 (Baldwin Hills), a community that is 72.11 percent African-American, Farmers charged the same good driver $2,394.40, an increase of $951.40, or 65.9 percent."]

Fact Sheet:
http://www.consumersunion.org/pdf/zip_fact.pdf

Chart:
http://www.consumersunion.org/pdf/Zip_chart.pdf

[Request #S60248]

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TRANSPORTATION

AUTOMOBILE SAFETY

Cell Phones and Highway Safety. By John Williams. The Research Department of Minnesota House of Representatives. (The Department, St. Paul, Minnesota) September 2005. 2 p.

["The growth and popularity of cellular telephones has raised questions about whether this technology is compatible with highway safety. Minnesota's first attempt to regulate cell phone use while driving applies only to drivers under age 18, but other states have gone further."]

[Request #S60249]

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VEHICLE FEES

Vehicle License Fee Adjustment: Calculations by the State Controller’s Office Complied With State Law. By California State Auditor. (The Auditor, Sacramento, California) October 2005. 12 p.

Full Text at: www.bsa.ca.gov/pdfs/reports/2005-125.1.pdf

[“Within its calculation the controller’s office determined the vehicle license fee adjustment for each city and county in the State. Moreover, the controller’s office determined that its calculation of the vehicle license fee adjustment for fiscal year 2005-06 was $0.3 billion greater than its fiscal year 2004-05 calculation. Finally, the controller’s office complied with state law when it incorporated that difference into the fiscal year 2005-06 vehicle license fee adjustment. The controller’s office calculated the difference for each local government throughout the State. By doing so, the controller’s office ensured that the vehicle license fee adjustment for each local government appropriately took into account the statutory requirements.”]

[Request #S60250]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

EDUCATION

ART EDUCATION

Third Space: When Learning Matters. By Richard J. Deasy and Lauren M. Stevenson. (Arts Education Partnership, Washington, DC) 2005. 174 p.

["'Third Space' tells the riveting story of the profound changes in the lives of kids, teachers, and parents in ten economically disadvantaged communities across the country that place their bets on the arts as a way to create great schools. The schools become caring communities where kids -- many of whom face challenges of poverty, the need to learn English, and to surmount learning difficulties -- thrive and succeed and where teachers find new joy and satisfaction in teaching."]

[Request #S54729]

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ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES

GLOBAL WARMING

"A Projection of Severe Near-surface Permafrost Degradation During the 21st century." By David M. Lawrence and Andrew Slater. IN: Geophysical Research Letters, vol 32 (2005).

["Global warming may decimate the top 10 feet (3 meters) or more of perennially frozen soil across the Northern Hemisphere, altering ecosystems as well as damaging buildings and roads across Canada, Alaska, and Russia. New simulations from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) show that over half of the area covered by this topmost layer of permafrost could thaw by 2050. Scientists expect the thawing to increase runoff to the Arctic Ocean and release vast amounts of carbon into the atmosphere." Science Daily (December 20, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S60252]

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HEALTH

HEALTH CARE POLICY

Healthy, Wealthy and Wise: Five Steps to a Better Health Care System. By John F. Cogan, and others, American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research. (The Institute, Washington, DC) October 2005. 3 p.

Full Text at: www.aei.org/book831

["Aiming to preserve the strengths of our current health care system while addressing its weaknesses, a set of policies would save $60 billion a year and provide insurance to 20 million currently uninsured [and] cost the federal government only $9 billion per year.... Tax policy and health insurance regulation have seriously hobbled private markets for health services."]

[Request #S60251]

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SMOKING

"Smoking in the Movies Increases Adolescent Smoking: A Review." By Annemarie Charlesworth and Stanton A. Glantz. IN: Pediatrics, vol 116 (December 2005) pp. 1516-1528.

["Smoking in the movies decreased from 1950 to 1990 and then increased rapidly. In 2002, smoking in movies was as common as it was in 1950. Beginning in 2002, the total amount of smoking in movies was greater in youth-rated (G/PG/PG-13) films than adult-rated (R) films, significantly increasing adolescent exposure to movie smoking. Viewing antismoking advertisements before viewing movie smoking seems to blunt the stimulating effects of movie smoking on adolescent smoking."]

[Request #S60253]

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TRANSPORTATION

AUTOMOBILE SAFETY

"Risk of Injury to Child Passengers in Sport Utility Vehicles." By Lauren Daly, A.I. Dupont Hospital for Children in Wilmington, Delaware, and others. IN: Pediatrics (January 2006)

["Though the added weight of SUVs conferred some protection in non-rollover accidents, the vehicles were twice as likely as cars to roll over during a wreck. 'Contrary to public perception, SUVs do not provide superior protection to child occupants, compared with passenger cars,' wrote lead author Dr. Lauren Daly.... The highest odds of injury occurred among children riding unbelted in an SUV that rolled over." Reuters (January 3, 2006) 1.]

[Request #S60255]

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