Subject: Studies in the News 05-42 (November 20, 2005)


California State Library Logo
Studies in the News for
First Five California Logo
Children and Families Commission


Contents This Week

Introductory Material ECONOMY
   Economics of early childhood development
   Early education pays off
   Preschool and special education costs
EDUCATION
   Effects of kindergarten retention policy
   Model of early care and education
   Latino preschool students
   Family involvement in schools
   Effectiveness of early head start
   Benefits and disadvantages of preschool
HEALTH
   Training in infant mental health
   Young children's emotional development
   Aiding children exposed to trauma
HUMAN SERVICES
   Deaths in child care
   Child care arrangements
STUDIES TO COME
   Young children and trauma
   Mental health and early childhood
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News: Children and Family Supplement is a service provided to the First 5 California by the California State Library. The service features weekly lists of current articles focusing on Children and Family policy. Prior lists can be viewed from the California State Library's Web site at www.library.ca.gov/CRB/SITN/.

How to Obtain Materials Listed in SITN:

  • When available on the Internet, the URL for the full-text of each item is provided.

  • California State Employees may contact the State Information & Reference Center (916-654-0206; cslsirc@library.ca.gov) with the SITN issue number and the item number [S#].

  • All other interested individuals should contact their local library - the items may be available there, or may be borrowed by your local library on your behalf.

The following studies are currently on hand:

ECONOMY

CHILDREN

The Economic Impact of Early Childhood Development Programs in West Virginia. By Calvin Kent, Center for Business and Economic Research, Marshall University, and others. (Marshall University, Huntington, West Virginia) October 2005.

["What is the single most important thing West Virginia could do to improve its future economic strength? Double the number of miles of four-lane highway? Expand the community college system by putting a two-year program in every county? Reform the legal system? According to a $50,000 study paid for by the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation, the best thing West Virginia could do is invest in its early childhood education system. Money spent on programs such as Head Start, pre-kindergarten, preschools, family child care homes and child care centers is probably more important than any other current economic development effort, the report says." Herald-Dispatch (October 17, 2005) online.]

Executive Summary. 14 p.
http://www.marshall.edu/cber/research/Executive%20summary%20ECD%205.pdf

Full Report. 143 p.
http://www.marshall.edu/cber/research/ECDfinalreport.pdf

[Request #S54201]

Return to the Table of Contents

Minds Matter: Early Childhood Education Meets Economic Development. By Betty Joyce Nash. IN: Region Focus, vol. 9, no. 4 (Fall 2005) pp. 12-16.

Full Text at: www.richmondfed.org/publications/economic_research/region_focus/fall_2005/pdf/cover.pdf

["Studies demonstrate that participants in high-quality preschool programs grow up to obtain better paying jobs and commit fewer crimes than their counterparts. Investments in children from low-income households appear to be especially effective. In the cover story of the fall 2005 issue of Region Focus, Betty Joyce Nash examines North Carolina's Smart Start program, one of the nation's leading efforts in educating the very young." Market Wire (October 28, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S54202]

Return to the Table of Contents

The Cost Savings to Special Education from Pre-Schooling in Pennsylvania. By Clive R. Belfield, Queens College, City University of New York. (Pennsylvania Build Initiative, Pennsylvania Department of Education, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) 2005. 32 p.

Full Text at: www.governor.state.pa.us/governor/lib/governor/belfield_pa_report_final_100505.pdf

["Annually, the state of Pennsylvania spends almost $1 billion on special education. Federal and local contributions bring this total up to $2.7 billion. It is therefore imperative to ensure these funds are spent efficiently and to investigate ways to save on expenditures. One possibility is that – with early intervention to support children’s development – the need for expenditures later is reduced. This Report examines the potential cost-savings to special education budgets from additional investments in pre-schooling."]

[Request #S54203]

Return to the Table of Contents

EDUCATION

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

"Effects of Kindergarten Retention Policy on Children's Cognitive Growth in Reading and Mathematics." By Guanglei Hong and Stephen W. Raudenbush. IN: Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, vol. 27, no. 3. (Fall 2005) pp. 205-224.

Full Text at: www.aera.net/uploadedFiles/News_Media/News_Releases/2005/Kindergarten%20Retention-Hong%20&%20Raudenbush%20PDF.pdf

["When it comes to kindergartners, schools do more harm than good by making struggling pupils repeat a grade. After two years in kindergarten, the researchers found, the retained children were about half a year behind the same types of students who were promoted. Had the grade-repeaters been promoted instead, the authors concluded, all but the very lowest-achieving among them would have learned more." Education Week (October 13, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S54204]

Return to the Table of Contents

Early Care and Education: Realizing a Collective Vision. By Saskia Traill, National Economic Development and Law Center. (The Center, Oakland, California) 2005. 23 p.

Full Text at: www.nedlc.org/Publications/PDF_childcare/ececr.pdf

["The National Economic Development and Law Center offers its successful economic impact model for engaging policymakers, business and community leaders, and economic development professionals in early learning." Connect for Kids (November 7, 2005) online.]

[Request #S54205]

Return to the Table of Contents

“The Effectiveness of The Manchester Even Start Program in Improving Literacy Outcomes for Preschool Latino Students.” By Andrew M. Ryan, Brandeis University. IN: Journal of Research in Childhood Education, vol. 20, no. 1 (Fall 2005) pp. 15-26.

["Improving early childhood literacy outcomes for minority children (including Latinos) and children living in poverty is of particular importance to the Even Start program, due to the increased risk of substandard literacy development faced by these children.... This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of the early childhood education component of the Manchester School District's Even Start program in improving literacy outcomes for Latino students within the framework of the questions regarding the effectiveness of Even Start, home-visiting programs, and bilingual education."]

[Request #S54206]

Return to the Table of Contents

FAMILIES & SCHOOLS

Taking a Closer Look: A Guide to Online Resources on Family Involvement. By Heather B. Weiss and others. (Harvard Family Research Project, Cambridge, Massachusetts) September 2005. 49 p.

Full Text at: www.gse.harvard.edu/hfrp/content/projects/fine/resources/guide/resource_guide.pdf

["The guide contains information about what national organizations are currently doing in family involvement and home-school partnerships. It contains Web links to research, information, programs, and tools about parenting practices to support children’s learning and development, home-school relationships, parent leadership development, and collective engagement for school improvement and reform. The resource guide can be used to find out what’s new in the field, locate national organizations that support family involvement, and inspire new ideas."]

[Request #S54207]

Return to the Table of Contents

HEAD START

The Effectiveness of Early Head Start for 3-Year-Old Children and Their Parents: Lessons for Policy and Programs. By John M. Love, Mathematica Policy Research, and others. IN: Developmental Psychology, vol. 41, no. 6 (November 2005) 17 p.

Full Text at: www.apa.org/releases/dev416-love.pdf

["Early Head Start, a federal program begun in 1995 for low-income pregnant women and families with infants and toddlers, was evaluated through a randomized trial of 3,001 families in 17 programs.... analyses showed that 3-year-old program children performed better than did control children in cognitive and language development, displayed higher emotional engagement of the parent and sustained attention with play objects, and were lower in aggressive behavior. Compared with controls, Early Head Start parents were more emotionally supportive, provided more language and learning stimulation, read to their children more, and spanked less. The strongest and most numerous impacts were for programs that offered a mix of home-visiting and center-based services and that fully implemented the performance standards early."]

[Request #S54208]

Return to the Table of Contents

PRESCHOOL

How Much is Too Much? The Influence of Preschool Centers on Children’s Development Nationwide. By Susanna Loeb, Stanford University, Margaret Bridges, University of California, Berkeley, and others. Presentation at the Association for Policy Analysis and Management, November 4, 2005. (The Association, Washington, DC) 2005. 30 p.

Full Text at: pace.berkeley.edu/Stanford_Berkeley_pr23DA13.doc

["As taxpayers, parents and educators debate the value of public preschool for every child, a new study by UC Berkeley and Stanford researchers finds for the first time that middle-class children -- not just kids from the poorest families -- receive a boost in language and math skills from preschool. But its darker findings bolster earlier, more controversial conclusions that preschool can hinder social development." San Francisco Chronicle (November 1, 2005) online.]

[Request #S54209]

Return to the Table of Contents

HEALTH

CHILDREN

Training in Infant Mental Health. By Donna R. Weston, University of Washington, Seattle. IN: Infants and Young Children, vol. 18, no. 4 (October/December 2005) pp. 337-348.

Full Text at: depts.washington.edu/isei/review/weston_18.4_05.pdf

["Training approaches in the arena of infant mental health are evolving, demand for training experiences is growing, and recognition of challenges to building the infant-family workforce is improving understanding of training needs. The diversity in the prospective workforce creates challenges for training programs, for example, how to clearly define appropriate training objectives, how to define relevant knowledge base and skills, how to structure training approaches for such a heterogeneous population as the infant-family workforce, and how to provide training experiences that facilitate ongoing professional development for individual practitioners."]

[Request #S54210]

Return to the Table of Contents

MENTAL HEALTH

How Young Children Feel Is as Important as How They Think. By Lysa Hale. (Action Alliance for Children, Oakland, California) 2005. 24 p.

Full Text at: www.4children.org/pdf/SED_Rpt.pdf

["California is making exciting progress toward the goal of universally available, quality early childhood development programs. At the same time, public and political pressures to raise academic achievement threaten to overshadow the central message of brain development research: that young children’s social and emotional development, based on supportive, responsive relationships, is key to cognitive growth."]

[Request #S54211]

Return to the Table of Contents

In Harm's Way: Aiding Children Exposed to Trauma. Issue Brief, No. 23. (Grantmakers in Health, Denver, Colorado) November 2005.

["The ongoing toll of family, school, and community violence; the continuing threat of terror attacks; and the widespread destruction and dislocation caused by Hurricane Katrina have heightened concerns about the well-being of children exposed to trauma.... Grantmakers In Health (GIH) convened a group of grantmakers, researchers, and policymakers on May 4, 2005 to discuss the role of philanthropy in meeting the needs of children exposed to trauma.... This Issue Brief focuses on the needs of children exposed to trauma, strategies for early identification and intervention, and ensuring the provision of timely and appropriate services to them and their caregivers."]

Executive Summary. 2 p.
http://www.gih.org/usr_doc/Exec_Summaery.pdf

Issue Brief. 44 p.
http://www.gih.org/usr_doc/GIH_IssueBrief23pdf.pdf

[Request #S54212]

Return to the Table of Contents

HUMAN SERVICES

CHILD CARE

Fatalities and the Organization of Child Care in the United States, 1985–2003. By Julia Wrigley and Joanna Dreby. IN: American Sociological Review, vol. 70, no. 5 (October 2005) pp. 729-757.

Full Text at: www.gc.cuny.edu/faculty/research_briefs/childCare.pdf

[This study, "found that the rate of death among children receiving care in private homes was 16 times that of children in child care centers.... Infants are by far the most vulnerable children in care, Professor Wrigley found, and most often die from being shaken.... In a database she put together from state records, legal cases and news reports covering 1989 to 2003, she found 203 shaken-baby deaths in care in a private home and not a single one in a child care center.... Professor Wrigley found that the risks of injury and sexual abuse were both highest in family day care -- a usually informal arrangement in which several children receive care together in a private home -- while child care centers had the highest rate of near-miss incidents, as when a child wandered off onto a highway, for instance, or was left in a van." New York Times (November 1, 2005) online.]

[Request #S54213]

Return to the Table of Contents

Who's Minding the Kids? Child Care Arrangements: Winter 2002. By Julia Overturf Johnson. Current Population Reports, P70-101. (The Census Bureau, Washington, DC) October 2005. 24 p.

Full Text at: www.census.gov/prod/2005pubs/p70-101.pdf

["Two preschools. One nanny. One babysitter. And the linchpin: Grandmom who lives next door. These are the key elements that make up Adrienne Pierce's child care arrangement. 'It's all I can do to remember who is supposed to come, who is supposed to be paid, who's sick,' says Pierce, a Palo Alto mother of two. This 'hybrid' care, as Pierce calls it, works for the family. It is also fairly common, according to a U.S. census report about child care released Wednesday. The study, based on 2002 data, found that 22.4 percent of American children with working mothers are in multiple child care arrangements, including being cared for by grandparents." Early Education in the News (November 13, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S54214]

Return to the Table of Contents


STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

HEALTH

MENTAL HEALTH

Hope and Healing: A Caregiver's Guide to Helping Young Children Affected by Trauma. By Kathleen Fitzgerald Rice and Betsy Groves McAlister. (Zero to Three, Washington, DC) 2005. 68 p.

["In recent years, therapists, educators and researchers have learned a great deal about children and trauma. Findings suggest that recovery often depends on early childhood professionals who understand children and trauma and have the skills to help children and support families. 'Hope and Healing' is a guide for early childhood professionals who care for children in a variety of early care and education settings. The authors define trauma and help readers recognize its effects on young children. They also offer tips, resources, and proven intervention strategies for working with traumatized children and their families and for managing stress."]

[Request #S54215]

Return to the Table of Contents

Diagnostic Classification, 0-3R: Diagnostic Classification of Mental Health and Developmental Disorders of Infancy and Early Childhood, Revised. (Zero to Three, Washington, DC) 2005. 85 p.

[The newly revised 'Diagnostic Classification of Mental Health and Developmental Disorders of Infancy and Early Childhood, (DC:0-3R)' "enhances your ability to prevent, diagnose, and treat mental health problems in the earliest years by identifying and describing disorders not addressed in other classification systems and by pointing the way to effective intervention approaches. Mental health clinicians, counselors, physicians, nurses, early interventionists, early childhood educators, and researchers will find DC: 0-3R to be an indispensable guide to evaluation and treatment planning with infants, toddlers, and their families in a wide range of settings."]

[Request #S54216]

Return to the Table of Contents