Subject: Studies in the News 05-36 (October 13, 2005)


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Studies in the News for
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Children and Families Commission


Contents This Week

Introductory Material DEMOGRAPHY
   County-level statistics on children
EDUCATION
   LGBT families and early education
   Evaluation of state pre-k programs
   Italian early childhood education program
   Strategies for early literacy development
HEALTH
   Universal early childhood health form
   New nutrition guidelines for children
HUMAN SERVICES
   Upgrading child care programs
   Leading child care support groups
   Impact of child care cuts
   Food hardship and behavior problems
   State fact sheet on child poverty
STUDIES TO COME
   Early teachers and special education
   Child care providers and overweight children
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News: Children and Family Supplement is a service provided to the First 5 California by the California State Library. The service features weekly lists of current articles focusing on Children and Family policy. Prior lists can be viewed from the California State Library's Web site at www.library.ca.gov/CRB/SITN/.

How to Obtain Materials Listed in SITN:

  • When available on the Internet, the URL for the full-text of each item is provided.

  • California State Employees may contact the State Information & Reference Center (916-654-0206; cslsirc@library.ca.gov) with the SITN issue number and the item number [S#].

  • All other interested individuals should contact their local library - the items may be available there, or may be borrowed by your local library on your behalf.

The following studies are currently on hand:

DEMOGRAPHY

CHILDREN

California County Data Book 2005. By Children Now. (Children Now, Oakland, California) 2005. 208 p.

Full Text at: publications.childrennow.org/publications/invest/databook_2005.cfm

["Policy-makers, community organizations and advocates need data and statistics to monitor changes in children's lives objectively, to investigate disparities in opportunities for children and to distribute resources efficiently and effectively. Since 1989, Children Now has tracked California children's well-being through annual statistical publications. This year's California County Data Book contains county-level statistics about California children's health, education, family economics and child welfare. The County Profiles draw a picture of children in each county with 26 measurements of children's well-being. Thirty-three County Ranking Charts allow for county-by-county comparisons."]

[Request #S53601]

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EDUCATION

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

Making Room in the Circle: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Families in Early Childhood Education. By Lee Klinger Lesser. (Parent Services Project, San Rafael, California) 2005. 422 p.

Full Text at: www.parentservices.org/whatsnew/index.html

["Parent Services Project announces the release of a new early childhood curriculum, Making Room in the Circle: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Families in Early Childhood Education.... The information and activities in this curriculum provide a structure that college instructors, directors and trainers can use to break the cycle of exclusion and engage in work that protects the civil rights of all families." HandsNet (October 7, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S53602]

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Pre-Kindergarten in Eleven States: NCEDL's Multi-state Study of Pre-Kindergarten and Study of State-wide Early Education Programs (SWEEP): Preliminary Descriptive Report. By Diane Early, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and others. NCEDL Working Paper. (National Center for Early Development and Learning, Chapel Hill, North Carolina) May 24, 2005. 35 p.

Full Text at: www.fcd-us.org/pdfs/NCEDLPKin11States2.pdf

{"This paper reports results from a study of 240 state-funded PK programs. Compared to other preschool settings these state-funded PK programs maintain relatively high standards. But they still have many teachers without college degrees who are paid substantially less than public school teachers. While class size and teacher-child ratios are acceptable, opportunities for learning are lower than anticipated." Foundation for Child Development. The Learning Curve (September 28, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S53603]

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Working in the Reggio Way: A Beginner's Guide for American Teachers. By Julianne P. Wurm, San Francisco Unified School District. (Redleaf Press, St. Paul, Minnesota) 2005. 142 p.

["The municipal early childhood programs of Reggio Emilia, Italy, have created an educational reality that many other educators strive to achieve. A 1991 Newsweek article identified the programs in Reggio Emilia as the best early childhood programs in the world ('The Ten Best Schools in the World, and What We Can Learn from Them,' December 2, 1991) and thrust them into the international spotlight.... This book offers a tour of the Reggio approach through the eyes of a foreigner with one foot in both cultures.... It is a practical guide to help reshape your thinking towards working with young children." NOTE: Working in the Reggio Way... is available for loan.]

[Request #S53604]

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LITERACY

Latino Early Literacy Development: Strategies for Lifelong Learning and Success. By Antonia Lopez, National Council of La Raza. (La Raza, Washington, DC) 2005. 88 p.

Full Text at: www.nclr.org/files/34207_file_LatinoEarlyLit_Rpt_FNL.pdf

["Remarkably little early literacy research is currently focused on Latino children and their families despite the fact that Hispanics constitute 22% of all children under the age of five in the United States. Further, there exist large gaps in the literature related to the nature of first-and second-language influences on early literacy development and school readiness among young Latino children. The papers included in this report provide information and suggested activities that can be used from the moment children are born to begin to help children learn about the world."]

[Request #S53605]

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HEALTH

CHILDREN

Connecticut?s New Comprehensive and Universal Early Childhood Health Assessment Form. By Angela A. Crowley, Yale University School of Nursing, and Grace-Ann C. Whitney, Connecticut Department of Social Services. IN: Journal of School Health, vol. 75, no. 8 (October 2005) pp. 281-285.

["Health assessments are required for entrance into child care, Head Start, and preschool programs. However, state and federal screening and documentation mandates vary, and programs create their own forms for keeping required data on file.... This article describes how the passage of new legislation in Connecticut establishing a statewide prekindergarten program presented the opportunity to develop a comprehensive early childhood health form for all early childhood programs, which promotes children?s access to health services and coordination of care among health care professionals, early childhood providers, and families."]

[Request #S53606]

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"Dietary Recommendations for Children and Adolescents: A Guide for Practitioners." Consensus Statement From the American Heart Association. IN: Circulation, vol. 112 (September 27, 2005) pp. 2061-2075.

Full Text at: circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/reprint/112/13/2061

["The new recommendations for infants, children and adolescents revise the heart association's 1982 statement. Since then, more and more children have been falling into the overweight or obese category.... 10% of 2-year-olds are overweight, doubling the rate from the mid-1970s.... The heart association notes that by the time kids are 19 to 24 months, french fries are the most commonly eaten vegetable." USA Today (October 5, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S53607]

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HUMAN SERVICES

CHILD CARE

Coaching for Quality in Infant-Toddler Care: A Field Guide for Directors, Consultants, and Trainers. By Jesse Leinfelder and Marilyn Segal, Nova Southeastern University (Zero to Three Press, Washington, DC) 2005. 208 p.

["'Coaching for Quality in Infant-Toddler Care' is a field guide, or manual, for upgrading the quality of infant-toddler child-care programs.... The key to quality care is the quality of relationships -- relationships between the infant and her family, between child and caregiver, between caregiver and family, and among adults in the child-care setting. Very young children in out-of-home care settings need stable, consistent, and committed caregivers who have training in infant-toddler development, who understand components of appropriate care and environments, and who earn a living wage." NOTE: Coaching for Quality ... is available for loan.]

[Request #S53608]

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Creating Connections: How to Lead Family Child Care Support Groups. By Joan Laurion and Cherie Schmiedicke. (Redleaf Press, St. Paul, Minnesota) 2005. 150 p.

["This book presents step-by-step methods for organizing effective family child care support groups. Six chapters offer providers specific techniques ideal for building support, developing leadership, sharing knowledge and experiences, and improving the quality of care within your community. Specific skills covered include: shared leadership, community building, peer mentoring, inclusive decision making, group facilitation, agenda creation and timekeeping, and brainstorming, role-playing, and other alternatives to open discussion." NOTE: Creating Connections ... is available for loan.]

[Request #S53609]

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In Their Own Voices: Parents and Providers Struggling With Child Care Cuts. By Karen Schulman and Helen Blank, National Women's Law Center. (The Center, Washington, DC) August 2005. 60 p.

Full Text at: www.nwlc.org/pdf/ChildCareVOICESReport_September2005.pdf

["Over the past several years, federal funding for child care assistance has declined, and many states have taken steps backward in their child care policies.... To gain a fuller understanding of how the cuts have compounded existing challenges for child care, it is essential to examine not just the specific cuts that have been made but how these cuts have affected low-income families who cannot afford child care without help, the child care providers trying to serve these families, and the children who need high-quality care. This requires moving beyond the basic funding numbers, policy data, and the analysis of policy makers, to seek out the voices of the parents and providers themselves. This report aims to give an opportunity for those directly affected by federal and state child care cuts to have their stories heard."]

[Request #S53610]

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CHILDREN

"Food Hardship and Child Behavior Problems among Low-income Children." By Kristen S. Slack and Joan Yoo, University of Wisconsin?Madison. IN: Social Service Review, vol. 79, no. 3 (September 2005) pp. 511-536.

Full Text at: www.journals.uchicago.edu/SSR/journal/issues/v79n3/790305/790305.web.pdf

["Using data from two waves of a panel study of families that currently receive or recently received cash welfare benefits, this article examines the relationship between food hardship and behavior problems for two different age groups (3?5 years and 6?12 years). Results show that food hardship is positively associated with externalizing behavior problems for the older children even after controlling for parental stress, warmth, and depression. Food hardship is positively associated with internalizing behavior problems for the older group of children, and with both externalizing and internalizing behavior problems for the younger group of children. These effects are mediated by parental characteristics. Results suggest that practitioners who work with children should screen for food hardship as a potential source of behavior problems."]

[Request #S53611]

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Who are America's Poor Children? By Sarah Fass and Nancy K. Cauthen. (National Center for Children in Poverty, New York, New York) 2005. 4 p.

Full Text at: nccp.org/media/cpt05b_text.pdf

["This fact sheet in NCCP's series portrays the 12 million children who live in families with incomes below the federal poverty level and the 5 million children who live in families with only half that income and how rates differ widely across the states."]

[Request #S53612]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

EDUCATION

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

"Early Childhood Teacher Preparation in Special Education at 2- and 4-Year Institutions of Higher Education." By Florence Chang and others. IN: Journal of Early Intervention, vol. 27, no.2 (Winter 2005) pp. 110-124.

["The movement toward inclusion has made educating and caring for children with disabilities an increasingly critical part of the early education teacher's role. The goal of this paper is to describe the extent to which early childhood teacher preparation programs are including early childhood special education/early intervention content and experiences as part of their core course and practicum requirements. A nationally representative survey of 438 chairs and directors of early childhood teacher preparation programs revealed that while a large proportion of programs consider early childhood special education/early intervention to be a part of the mission of their program, the amount of coursework and practicum experience vary considerably by content area and level of degree offered by the program. Implications are offered for policy and future research."]

[Request #S53613]

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HUMAN SERVICES

CHILD CARE

"The Role of Child Care Providers in the Prevention of Childhood Overweight." By Kathleen Sellers, State University of New York, and others. IN: Journal of Early Childhood Research, vol. 3, no. 3 (October 2005) pp. 227-242.

["This qualitative study determined the role of childcare professionals in the prevention of childhood overweight. Facilitated focus group sessions were conducted with childcare professionals to ascertain their beliefs and practices in four domains: 1) foods and beverages; 2) physical activity; 3) TV, video, and computer game viewing; and 4) behaviors with respect to eating and/or activity. The researchers and childcare staff then collaboratively identified ways to develop innovative policy and environmental changes to improve the health and fitness of young children. Though more research is needed, engaging the support of the childcare profession is a promising avenue to improve the health and fitness of young children."]

[Request #S53614]

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