Subject: Studies in the News 05-13 (May 20, 2005)


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Studies in the News for
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Children and Families Commission


Contents This Week

Introductory Material EDUCATION
   Collective management of early childhood programs
   Kindergarten and young learners
   Overlooked benefits of prekindergarten
   Early childhood development issues
   Performance criteria for early childhood programs
HEALTH
   Santa Clara County's Health Kids program
   Latino children's health care
   Young children's social and emotional development
   Gender-specific trends in child and youth well-being
   Overweight children in Pennsylvania
HUMAN SERVICES
   California's child care and development system
   Relatives as child care providers
   Low-income families and federal budget
STUDIES TO COME
   Head Start and transition to kindergarten
   Childhood stress
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News: Children and Family Supplement is a service provided to the First 5 California by the California State Library. The service features weekly lists of current articles focusing on Children and Family policy. Prior lists can be viewed from the California State Library's Web site at www.library.ca.gov/CRB/SITN/.

How to Obtain Materials Listed in SITN:

  • When available on the Internet, the URL for the full-text of each item is provided.

  • California State Employees may contact the State Information & Reference Center (916-654-0206; cslsirc@library.ca.gov) with the SITN issue number and the item number [S#].

  • All other interested individuals should contact their local library - the items may be available there, or may be borrowed by your local library on your behalf.

The following studies are currently on hand:

EDUCATION

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

Collective Management of Early Childhood Programs: Approaches that Aim to Maximize Efficiency, Help Improve Quality and Stabilize the Industry. By Louise Stoney, Smart Start Technical Assistance Center and the Cornell University Linking Economic Development and Child Care Research Project. (The Alliance for Early Childhood Finance, Raleigh, North Carolina) [2005]. 76 p.

Full Text at: www.earlychildhoodfinance.org/handouts/CollectiveManagementfullreport.pdf

["Collective management of early childhood programs appears to offer multiple benefits for participating programs, including: administrative cost savings, better cash flow and fiscal stability, stronger fundraising and increased capacity to carry debt, better working conditions for staff, access to support services, and better quality services for children and their families." Child Development Policy Institute (April 17, 2005).]

[Request #S51302]

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Kindergarten and Beyond [Issue Theme.] By Kristie Kauerz and others. IN: Beyond the Journal (March 2005) Online.

Full Text at: www.journal.naeyc.org/btj/200503/

[Includes "State Kindergarten Policies: Straddling Early Learning and Elementary School;" "Collaborative Steps: Paving the Way to Kindergarten for Young Children with Disabilities;" and "Celebrating Young Learners at Work: Valuing Reading-Like Behavior."]

[Request #S51305]

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EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH

Overlooked Benefits of Prekindergarten. By Karen Schulman, National Institute for Early Education Research. (The Institute, New Brunswick, New Jersey) 2005. 10 p.

Full Text at: nieer.org/resources/policyreports/report6.pdf

["Studies have shown that high-quality prekindergarten can better prepare children for school, increase their chances of academic success, and even enable them to avoid welfare and crime later in life. These studies also suggest that prekindergarten can strengthen a child's commitment and attitude toward school, enhance the parenting skills of children's parents, and have positive impacts on family relationships. This report summarizes research findings about these wider benefits of early education."]

[Request #S51303]

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Early Childhood Development: What Parents Need to Know. By the United States Department of Education. (The Department, Washington, DC) April 19, 2005. 1 hour video broadcast.

Full Text at: www.ed.gov/news/av/video/edtv/index.html

[This broadcast explores the following: What does the medical community tell us about the latest research on brain development and its ties to early learning? What do effective preschool and early literacy programs look like? What activities can parents do-in and out of the home-to help lay the important foundation for reading? In what ways does poverty affect a child's acquisition of prereading skills? What resources are available to prepare children to be successful in school? What types of professional development should early childhood professionals to ensure students are prepared for elementary school?" NOTE: This broadcasted live on April 19th and is now archived and viewable as a webcast.]

[Request #S51304]

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EDUCATIONAL STANDARDS

NAEYC Early Childhood Program Standards and Accreditation Performance Criteria. By the National Association for the Education of Young Children. (The Association, Washington, DC) April 2005. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.naeyc.org/accreditation/next_era.asp

["Ensuring the quality of children's daily experiences in early childhood programs and promoting positive child outcomes is the heart of the new NAEYC Early Childhood Program Standards and Accreditation Performance Criteria. Achieving excellence requires early childhood programs to have an effective and durable support structure. This support structure promotes program accountability and makes it possible for classroom life to be consistently nurturing and filled with learning opportunities for each child-and for this high level of quality to be sustained over time."]

[Request #S51301]

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HEALTH

ACCESS TO CARE

Santa Clara Healthy Kids Program Reduces Gaps in Children's Access to Medical and Dental Care. By Christopher Trenholm, Mathematica Policy Research, and others. (Mathematica, Princeton, New Jersey) April 2005. 6 p.

Full Text at: www.mathematica-mpr.com/publications/PDFs/chihealthykids.pdf

["Launched in January 2001 by the Santa Clara County Children's Health Initiative, Healthy Kids provides health insurance coverage to children in the county with household income below 300 percent of the federal poverty level who are ineligible for the two major state insurance programs, Medi-Cal and Healthy Families. This brief provides a profile of these children and information on the impact of Healthy Kids on their medical and dental care."]

[Request #S51307]

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CHILDREN

Maximizing Societal Contributions of Latino Adults by Investing in Latino Children's Health Care. By M. Iya Kahramanian, Center for the Study of Latino Health and Culture, University of California, Los Angeles, and others. (The California Endowment, Woodland Hills, California) April 2005. 16 p.

Full Text at: www.calendow.org/reference/publications/pdf/access/TCE0418-2005_UCLA%20Latino%20Report%20FINAL.pdf

["Nearly one-fourth of Latino children in California do not have health insurance, and the lack of preventive care has far-reaching consequences on society, according to this study issued by the UCLA Center for the Study of Latino Health and Culture." Connect for Kids (May 2, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S51308]

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Key Measurement Issues in Screening, Referral, and Follow-Up Care for Young Children's Social and Emotional Development. By Colleen Reuland and Christina Bethell. National Academy for State Health Policy. (The Academy, Portland, Maine) April 2005. 37 p.

Full Text at: www.nashp.org/Files/measurement_paper_for_web_final_4.7.05.pdf

["Research demonstrates that children's healthy social and emotional development is essential to school readiness, academic success, and overall well-being. Medicaid, which in 2003, covered about one in four of all children and about half of all low-income children can do much to improve young children's healthy mental development, and a number of state Medicaid agencies have expressed interest in doing so. To assist states in these efforts, the National Academy for State Healthy Policy administers the ABCD II initiative, a three-year project designed to build state capacity to deliver care that supports children's healthy mental development. Five states including California, participate in the ABCD II Consortium which began its work in early 2004."]

[Request #S51309]

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Assessing Gilligan vs. Sommers: Gender-Specific Trends in Child and Youth Well-being in the United States, 1985-2001. By Sarah Meadows and others. IN: Social Indicators Research, vol. 70, no. 1 (January 2005) pp. 1-52.

["The study found that the overall well-being of boys and girls has improved at about the same rate. However, the study found some differences among boys and girls. For example, according to the study, boys are less likely to have low body weights at birth, and girls are less likely to use illicit drugs and alcohol." California Healthline (February 24, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S51310]

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OBESITY

Overweight Children in Pennsylvania. By the Center for Rural Pennsylvania. (The Center, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) 2005. 14 p.

Full Text at: www.ruralpa.org/Overweight_child.pdf

["While the childhood obesity problem is widespread, some kids are at greater risk. This study found higher rates of childhood obesity in rural areas of Pennsylvania. Nearly 16 percent of urban and 20 percent of rural students qualified as obese." Connect for Kids Weekly (March 21, 2005).]

[Request #S51311]

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HUMAN SERVICES

CHILD CARE

California's Child Care and Development System. By Scott Graves, California Budget Project. Budget Backgrounder: Making Dollars Make Sense. (The Project, Sacramento, California) April 2005. 18 p.

Full Text at: www.cbp.org/2005/0504bb_childcare.pdf

["California's subsidized child care system is complex and is delivered through an array of programs. Hundreds of thousands of children receive subsidized child care through both CalWORKS and non CALWORKs child care and development programs. However, the state has not increased the income eligibility limit for subsidized child care since 2000 and more than 200,000 children were estimated to be waiting for subsidized child care in 2003."]

[Request #S51312]

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Use of Relative Care by Working Parents. By Kathleen Snyder and others. Snapshots3 of America's Families. No. 3. (Urban Institute, Washington, DC) April 2005. 2 p.

Full Text at: www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/311161_snapshots3_No23.pdf

["The percentage of children who spent time being cared for by relatives was largely unchanged between 1999 and 2002. Over one-quarter of children under age 3 are in only relative care, compared with about one-fifth of older children. Some 8.9 million children under age 13 regularly spend time in the care of relatives while their parents work; 6.4 million of these children are in relative care as their only nonparental child care arrangement."]

[Request #S51313]

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LOW INCOME

Economic Insecurity: Implications of Federal Budget Proposals for Low-Income Working Families. By Nancy K. Cauthen and Kinsey Alden Dinan, National Center for Children in Poverty. (The Center, New York, New York) April 2005. 10 p.

Full Text at: www.nccp.org/media/ape05_text.pdf

["Despite the fact that nearly 15 million children in this country have a parent who works full time yet can't afford basic necessities, federal budget proposals put forth by President Bush and the U.S. Congress call for dramatic cuts to programs that assist low-income families. This brief uses its Family Resource Simulator to show how proposed cuts in Medicaid, food stamps, housing assistance, and child care will affect families' ability to make ends meet."]

[Request #S51314]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

EDUCATION

HEAD START

"Head Start's Children's Transition to Kindergarten: Evidence from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study." By Therese D. Pigott, Loyola University Chicago. IN: Journal of Early Childhood Research, vol. 3, no. 1 (2005) pp. 77-104.

["It has been acknowledged that children from poverty begin school missing many of the prerequisites for school success. Head Start is the major federal program aimed at providing children in poverty the experiences necessary to start school on an equal footing with their same-age peers. This article uses data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS) to examine the reading and math assessment scores of Head Start children as compared to their same-age peers at kindergarten entry. The data suggests that while Head Start children score higher than their same-age peers when compared to non-Head Start children from the same socio-economic status, there is still a gap between Head Start children and their peers in schools with higher social economic standing."]

[Request #S51315]

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HEALTH

CHILDREN

"Post-traumatic Stress and Its Effect on Health Outcomes in Chldren." By Jacqueline Grupp-Phelen and Doug Zatzick. IN: Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 146, no. 3 (March 2005) pp. 309-310.

["This study finds children who suffer post-traumatic stress disorder after exposure to violence are more likely to have other health problems. Most of the children who had witnessed at least one violent incident began bed-wetting and thumb-sucking, while 20 percent appeared to be at risk of PTSD." United Press International (March 9, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S51316]

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