Subject: Studies in the News 04-66 (October 8, 2004)


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News:
Children and Family Supplement


Contents This Week

Introductory Material

ECONOMY
   Children and access to technology
EDUCATION
   Hispanic-White achievement gap
   California schools and music education
   Ethnic differences in high quality pre-kindergarten
   Early childhood education perspectives
   Latino-based framework for early education
   Indicators of early school success
   International educational issues and trends
   Technology and young children
   Preschool for California's children
   School financing and poverty
   Parents' guide to school readiness
EMPLOYMENT
   California's Latino workforce
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
   Government spending and generational differences
   State policies affecting working families
   Governors' guide to Children's Cabinets
HEALTH
   Science of child development
   Children's well-being in the Central Valley
   Update on child health issues
   Reducing disparities in child health care
   Children and early dental care
   State of health care plans in the U.S.
   Hispanic adult mortality
   Infant mental health conference
   Preschool child-obesity intervention
HOUSING
   Racial and ethnic differences in home equity
   Chronic health conditions in suburbs
HUMAN SERVICES
   Advocating for children
   State data on child care affordability
   Family and child well-being indicators
   Marriage and living arrangements by ethnicity
   Food stamp usage across the lifespan
   Well-being of immigrant youth
   Children of immigrant families
   Differences in low-income rates among the states
STUDIES TO COME
   Education and economic development
   Childhood obesity
   Antibiotic use and child care

Studies in the News is a very current compilation of items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau to supplement the public policy debate in California’s Capitol. To help share the latest information with state policymakers, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library’s website. This week's list of current articles in various public policy areas is presented below.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • California State Employees may contact the State Information & Reference Center (916-654-0206; cslsirc@library.ca.gov) with the SITN issue number and the item number [S#].

  • All other interested individuals should contact their local library - the items may be available there, or may be borrowed by your local library on your behalf.

The following studies are currently on hand:

ECONOMY

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Children, the Digital Divide, and Federal Policy. By the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. (The Foundation, Menlo Park, California) September 2004. 16 p.

Full Text at: www.kff.org/entmedia/loader.cfm?url=/commonspot/security/getfile.cfm&PageID=46360

["A great deal of progress has been made in closing the digital divide. Federal policies aimed at expanding basic access have helped bring nearly all schools and libraries online and supported the development of technology centers in disadvantaged communities. Most children from all major income groups and ethnicities have gone online, but significant gaps in both the quantity and quality of access remain."]

[Request #S4105]

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EDUCATION

ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

Research Sheds New Light on the Hispanic-White Achievement Gap. By the Education Commission of States. The Progress of Education Reform 2004: Hispanic Achievement. Vol. 5, No. 3. (The Commission, Denver, Colorado) August 2004. 6 p.

Full Text at: 66.102.7.104/custom?q=cache:JmzssdEHdkgJ:www.ecs.org/clearinghouse/53/97/5397.pdf+%22research+sheds+new+light+on+the+hispanic-white+achievement+gap%22&hl=en&ie=UTF-8

["This issue brief summarizes several recent studies and analyses that shed new light on the dimensions, causes, and social and economic consequences of Hispanic underachievement. Among the key findings: the Hispanic student population is not a monolithic group of low performers, but rather a heterogeneous one in which some students perform well and other do not. Closing the achievement gap will require addressing a range of social, economic and educational issues."]

[Request #S4106]

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ARTS IN EDUCATION

The Sound of Silence: The Unprecedented Decline of Music Education in the California Public Schools. By Music For All Foundation. (The Foundation, Warren, New Jersey) September 2004. 24 Pages.

Full Text at: www.music-for-all.org/documents/SoundofSilence_004.pdf

["This report citing the steady decline of music instruction in California schools over the past five years, confirms what many local educators say they already knew. The percentage of all California public school students involved in music education has dropped by 50 percent since the 1999-2000 school year. The report concludes that student participation in music has declined by 46.5 percent -- about 512,366 students in the past five years." Center for Arts and Culture (September 2004) 1.]

[Request #S4108]

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EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

Who Benefits from High Quality Pre-Kindergarten? Investigating Ethnicity/Race Differences in the RECAP 2002 Sample. By Guillermo Montes and Debra S. Hoffman, Children's Institute. (The Institute, Rochester, New York) 2004. 9 p.

Full Text at: www.childrensinstitute.net/images/T04-004.pdf

["Previous reports have established an inconsistent pattern of results regarding the association of minority ethnicity with change scores in the Child Observation Record (COR) and the Teacher-Child Rating Scale (TCRS). The purpose of this study is to resolve some of these differences. Black and Latino students had lower gains in cognitive, social, task orientation and behavior control than comparable white and Asian-American peers. The inclusion of Asian-American students in a minority classification including Black and Latino students concealed the COR results, but had no impact on results using the T-CRS."]

[Request #S4107]

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Early Childhood Education: Society and Culture. Edited by Angela Anning and others. (SAGE Publications, Thousand Oaks, California) 2004. 226 p.

["This book presents social and cultural perspectives on current theories of learning in early childhood education. It sets out research-based evidence, linking theory and practice in early childhood settings. At the heart of this book is a strong and traditional theme -- the importance of the child's perspective and respect for each child's individual background. Within the context of early years settings, the book is structured around four overall themes: dynamics of learning and teaching, nature of knowledge, assessment, and evaluation and quality." NOTE: Early Childhood Education ... is available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S4109]

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Connections and Commitments: A Latino-Based Framework for Early Childhood Educators. By Costanza Eggers-Pierola. (Education Development Center, Newton, Massachusetts) 2002. 21 p.

Full Text at: ccf.edc.org/ConnectionsCommitments.pdf

["The cultural and linguistic values, principles, and practices outlined here are aligned with the four pillars of knowledge identified by UNESCO’s Task Force for the Twenty-first Century as the key to life-long learning. The Framework identifies those values, principles, and practices that are essential for increasing the capacity of early childhood programs and training institutions to be responsive to the particular needs and preferences of many people of Latino background in the U.S."]

[Request #S4110]

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Indicators of Early School Success and Child Well-Being. By Sharon Vandivere and others, Child Trends. Cross Currents. Issue 3. (Child Trends, Washington, DC) October 2004. 14 p.

Full Text at: www.childtrendsdatabank.org/PDF/ECLS-K.pdf

["This data brief examines indicators of well-being and development among children entering kindergarten and describes changes in these indicators as children move from kindergarten to first grade. The brief pays particular attention to differences in children's progress on these indicators by gender, race and ethnicity, language spoken at home, disability status, and socioeconomic status."]

[Request #S4113]

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EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH

Challenging Issues and Rays of Hope: International Focus Issue. IN: Childhood Education: Infancy Through Early Adolescence, vol. 80, no. 6 (2004) pp. 291-339.

[Includes: "From Principle to Practice: Using the Global Guidelines to Assess Quality Education and Care;" "Ethics and ACEI: Beginning the Conversation;" "Supporting Inclusive Care and Education for Youth, Children with Special Needs and Their Families: An International Perspective;" and others. NOTE: Childhood Education ... is available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S4111]

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INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Tech Tonic: Towards a New Literacy of Technology. By Colleen Cordes and others. (Alliance for Childhood, College Park, Maryland) September 2004. 124 p.

Full Text at: www.allianceforchildhood.net/projects/computers/pdf_files/tech_tonic.pdf

["This report contends that there is scant evidence of long-term benefits from immersing preschool- and school-age children in electronic technologies. Increasing numbers of them spend hours each day sitting in front of screens instead of playing outdoors, reading, and getting much-needed physical exercise and face-to-face social interaction -- all of which, it turns out, also provide essential stimulation to the growing mind and intellect." Washington Post (September 30, 2004) 1.]

[Request #S4112]

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PRESCHOOL

Preschool for California's Children: Promising Benefits, Unequal Access. By Margaret Bridges and others. Policy Brief. 04-3. (Policy Analysis for California Education, Berkeley, California and UC Linguistic Minority Research Institute, Santa Barbara, California) September 2004.

["This study found that large numbers of children, especially minorities and those from lower-income households, start school already lagging their peers in reading and math skills. But children who attend preschool early and regularly are about four months -- or almost half a school year -- ahead of those who don't. In a less positive finding, the report said children who attended preschool for long hours, more than 34 per week, showed slightly higher levels of aggression and immature social behavior." Los Angeles Daily News (September 7, 2004).]

Policy Brief. 12 p.:
http://pace.berkeley.edu/PACE%20LMRI%20Brief%209_1_04.pdf

Graphs. 2 p.:
http://pace.berkeley.edu/PACE%20Graphs%209_1_04.pdf

Maps. 1 p.:
http://pace.berkeley.edu/map_ECLS_family.pdf

[Request #S4114]

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SCHOOL FINANCE

The Funding Gap 2004: Many States Still Shortchange Low-Income and Minority Students. By Kevin Carey. The Education Trust. (The Trust, Washington, DC) Fall 2004. 17 p.

Full Text at: www2.edtrust.org/NR/rdonlyres/30B3C1B3-3DA6-4809-AFB9-2DAACF11CF88/0/funding2004.pdf

["This study looked at the difference in school funding between the highest and lowest poverty school districts in 2001. The report found a gap of more than $1000 per students nationwide, and a similar gap between white and minority students. Overall the gap is growing, and many states remain stubbornly the same -- or provide relatively fewer dollars to high-poverty districts."]

[Request #S4123]

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SCHOOL READINESS

Getting Ready for School Begins at Birth: How to Help Your Child Learn in the Early Years. By Claire Lerner and Lynette A. Ciervo. (Zero to Three, Washington, DC) 2004. 7 p.

Full Text at: www.zerotothree.org/schoolreadiness/

["With so much emphasis today on preparing children for school, parents are eager to know how they can help their young children learn. This booklet is designed to help parents understand what they can do to get their baby or toddler off to the best start by using everyday interactions to teach the basic skills she will need to cooperate, get along with others, and be an enthusiastic learner."]

[Request #S4115]

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EMPLOYMENT

WAGES

Boom, Bust and Beyond: The State of Working California. By the California Budget Project. (The Project, Sacramento, California) September 2004. 16 p.

Full Text at: www.cbp.org/2004/0408latinoreport.pdf

["Latino workers' wages in California have risen more than twice as fast as non-Latinos' pay since the mid-1990s. But Latinos on average still make far less than non-Latinos of similar occupations and educational levels in the state, and are still disproportionately represented among California's working poor." Los Angeles Times (September 30, 2004) 1.]

[Request #S4126]

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GENERAL GOVERNMENT

BUDGETING

"Generational Differences in U.S. Public Spending, 1980-2000." By S. Pati and others. IN: Public Affairs, vol. 23, no. 5 (September/October 2004) pp. 131-141.

["This article describes trends in social welfare spending for children and the elderly between 1980 and 2000 and discusses the relationship between national economic trends and social welfare spending patterns. The authors conclude that while the elderly are afforded a basic guarantee of support regardless of economic and political changes, social welfare spending on children is left vulnerable to these fluctuations." Maternal and Child Health Alert (October 1, 2004) 1.]

[Request #S4117]

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PUBLIC POLICY

State Policies That Affect Working Families. By Katherin Ross Phillips, the Urban Institute. Assessing the New Federalism Discussion Paper. No. 04-05. (The Institute, Washington, DC) August 31, 2004. 56 p.

Full Text at: www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/311048_DP04-05.pdf

["States make many decisions that affect working parents, such as job-protected family care policies, child care subsidies, early childhood education and elementary school schedules, and tax policy. This paper compiles information on state choices in each of these areas of family policy and discusses possible avenues for future state policymaking."]

[Request #S4127]

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STATE GOVERNMENTS

A Governor's Guide to Children's Cabinets. By the NGA Center for Best Practices, the National Governor's Association. (The Association, Washington, DC) August 2004. 59 p.

Full Text at: www.nga.org/cda/files/0409GOVGUIDECHILD.pdf

["Governors’ Children’s Cabinets are collaborative governance structures that seek to promote coordination across state agencies and improve the well-being of children and families. A strong and effective Children’s Cabinet can improve coordination and efficiency across state departments and local levels of government and strengthen partnerships with the non-profit and private sectors. This Guide is designed to serve as a road map in designing a successful Governor’s Children’s Cabinet."]

[Request #S4118]

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HEALTH

CHILDREN

What Science is Telling Us: How Neurobiology and Developmental Psychology are Changing the Way Policymakers and Communities Should Think about the Developing Child. By Dorian Friedman, National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. (The Council, Waltham, Massachusetts) 2004. 11 p.

Full Text at: www.developingchild.net/papers/paper_2.pdf

["An explosion in scientific research over the past few decades has shed new light on the most remarkable stages of human development – and the critical importance of the earliest months and years of life. From a basic understanding of the evolution of the brain itself to the elaborate interplay between environmental and genetic influences on personality, we are coming to learn more than we ever imagined about the developmental challenges children face and what kinds of experiences and environments can help them master childhood."]

[Request #S4119]

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Children in Jeopardy: A Sourcebook for Community Action. Child Health and Well-Being Indicators in the Central California Region. By Petra Sutton and others. (Central California Children's Institute, Fresno, California) 2004. 119 p.

["This book was designed as a quick reference tool to access leading child health and well-being indicators and provide current epidemiological data for children in the counties of the Central California region: Fresno, Inyo, Kern, Kings, Madera, Mariposa, Merced, Mono, San Joaquin, Stanislaus, Tulare and Tuolumne. This report utilizes tables and figures to document key health and well-being issues affecting children in Central California." NOTE: Children in Jeopardy ... is available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S4120]

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Child Health: A Progress Report [Issue Theme.] IN: Health Affairs, vol. 23, no. 5 (September/October 2004) pp. 1-281.

[Includes: "To What Are Children Entitled? Coming Challenges;" "The Transformation of Child Health;" "Are the Most Vulnerable Children Covered?;" "Health Spending: Kids Versus Seniors;" "Childhood Vaccine Safety and Funding;" "Reform Agenda for Child Health;" "Policies to Reduce Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Child Health and Health Care;" and others.]

[Request #S4121]

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"Policies to Reduce Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Child Health and Health Care." By Anne C. Beal. IN: Health Affairs, vol. 23, issue 5 (October 2004) pp. 171-179.

["The medical care that minority children receive often is inferior to that enjoyed by other children. This article describes an arsenal of weapons available for reducing racial disparities in health care: broadening health care coverage, adopting common quality improvement efforts, improving the training of health care providers, and boosting the ranks of minority clinicians." Commonwealth Fund Email Alert (September 14, 2004).]

[Request #S4128]

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DENTAL CARE

"Early Preventive Dental Visits: Effects on Subsequent Utilization and Costs." By Matthew F. Savage, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and others. IN: Pediatrics, vol. 114, no. 4 (October 2004) pp. e418-e424.

Full Text at: pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/reprint/114/4/e418

["This study suggests that the earlier the first dental check up, the lower the total costs for dental care. The average dental care cost for a child first visiting the dentist before age 1 was $262, compared with $546 for children whose dental visits began at ages 4 to 5. Children from racial minority groups had more difficulty accessing dental care, as did those in rural areas with fewer dentists." Connect for Kids Weekly (October 4, 2004).]

[Request #S4122]

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HEALTH CARE

State of Health Care Quality 2004. By the National Committee for Quality Assurance. (The Committee, Washington, DC) 2004. 61 p.

Full Text at: www.ncqa.org/communications/SOMC/SOHC2004.pdf

["California health plans rank below average in following recommended medical care guidelines, according to a national report. The report evaluated performance scores voluntarily submitted for 2003 by 563 health plans in areas such as immunization, diabetes management and breast cancer screening. No California health plan made the country's top 10 list of performers." Contra Costa Times (September 23, 2004) 1.]

[Request #S4129]

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LATINOS

"Paradox Lost: Explaining the Hispanic Adult Mortality Advantage." By Alberto Palloni and Elizabeth Arias. IN: Demography, vol. 41, no. 3 (August 2004) pp. 385-415.

Full Text at: www.prb.org/cpipr/demography/Palloni.pdf

["Research has shown that Hispanics in the United States experience lower mortality rates in adulthood than do non-Hispanic whites. It has been argued that this phenomenon is a paradox because Hispanics generally have lower socioeconomic status than do non-Hispanic whites. It is, therefore, deemed paradoxical that Hispanics could have better health and mortality profiles than non-Hispanic whites, a population with a more favorable socioeconomic composition. This article explores various hypotheses associated with the paradox."]

[Request #S4130]

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MENTAL HEALTH

Amsterdam World Congress: Plenary Papers [Special Issue.] IN: Infant Mental Health Journal, vol. 25, no. 5 (September-October 2004) pp. 397-507.

[Includes: "Widening Our Horizons in Infant Mental Health;" "Decade of Behavior Distinguished Lecture: Development of Physical Aggression During Infancy;" "Fathers and Families: Locating the Ghost in the Nursery;" "Community Outreach for Children Exposed to Violence;" and others. NOTE: Amsterdam World Congress ... is available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S4131]

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OBESITY

"Feasibility and Benefits of a Parent-Focused Preschool Child Obesity Intervention." By Elizabeth McGarvey and others. IN: American Journal of Public Health, vol. 94, no. 9 (September 2004) pp. 1490-1495.

["This study found that, after obesity-prevention education at WIC centers, parents more often offer their children water and engage with them in active play, and increasing PE in kindergarten and first grade by one hour per week could reduce overweight in 5- and 6-year-old girls by up to 10%." Action Alliance for Children Email News Bulletin (September 2004).]

[Request #S4124]

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HOUSING

HOME OWNERSHIP

"Housing and Wealth Inequality: Racial-Ethnic Differences in Home Equity in the United States." By Lauren J. Krivo and Robert L. Kaufman. IN: Demography, vol. 41, no. 3 (August 2004) pp. 585-605.

Full Text at: www.prb.org/cpipr/demography/Krivo.pdf

["U.S. black and Hispanic homeowners have significantly lower levels of home equity than do white and Asian homeowners, even after a wide range of characteristics (including education, income, and housing values) are taken into account, according to this study, based on the authors analysis on the 2001 American Housing Survey." HispanicBusiness.com (September 23, 2004).]

[Request #S4132]

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HOUSING

"Suburban Sprawl and Physical Mental Health." By R. Sturm and D.A. Cohen. IN: Public Health, vol. 118, no.7 (October 2004) pp. 488-496.

["Fleeing the city for the suburbs may be hazardous to your health. This study found that people who live in sprawling areas, such as the Inland Empire or Atlanta, are more likely to report chronic health conditions than those in compact urban cores like Long Beach or New York. The findings suggest that an adult who lives in a more sprawling urban area will have a health profile similar to someone four years older." Los Angeles Times (September 28, 2004) B5.]

[Request #S4133]

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HUMAN SERVICES

ADVOCACY FOR CHILDREN

Turning Point: Engaging the Public on Behalf of Children. By Ellen Galinsky, Families and Work Institute, and others. (The Advertising Council, New York, New York) 2004. 44 p.

Full Text at: www.adcouncil.org/pdf/commitment_children_turning_point_report.pdf

["Not only did the 2004 results indicate that the public has a more positive view of children, but they also showed that most Americans now acknowledge the importance of community support in helping parents raise children. The increased optimism is also reflected in the fact that 78 percent indicated they would like to help children in their community." Children's Bureau Express (October 2004).]

[Request #S4125]

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CHILD CARE

Child Care Assistance Policies 2001-2004: Families Struggling to Move Forward, States Going Backward. By Karen Schulman and Helen Blank. (National Women's Law Center, Washington, DC) September 2004. 17 p.

Full Text at: www.nwlc.org/pdf/childcaresubsidyfinalreport.pdf

["Parents need reliable child care so that they can get and keep jobs to support their families. Yet many families, particularly low-income families struggling to make ends meet, cannot stretch their limited budgets to afford child care, which can easily cost $4,000 to $10,000 a year for one child. However, a comparison of state child care assistance policies in 2004 and 2001, based on data provided by state child care administrators, reveals that instead of finding more help, many families now face increased barriers."]

[Request #S4134]

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CHILDREN

Chartbook of Major Indicators: Conditions Placing Children in the South at Risk. By Southern Institute on Children and Families. (The Institute, Columbia, South Carolina) August 2004. 95 p.

Full Text at: www.kidsouth.org/pdf/2004%20Chartbook.pdf

["The Southern Region continues to lag behind the other regions in the United States in key indicators of child and family well-being. These longstanding issues can affect all families and continue to place children at risk. The South is plagued by high rates of children and individuals in poverty, a high percent of children unprepared to succeed in school, adults unprepared for the workforce and high rates of children whose lower income working parents cannot afford safe, quality child care."]

[Request #S4135]

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Marriage Promotion and the Living Arrangements of Black, Hispanic, and White Children. By Laura Wherry and Kenneth Finegold, Urban Institute. (The Institute, Washington, DC) September 2004. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/311064_B-61.pdf

["With the enactment of welfare reform in 1996, encouraging and supporting marriage became priorities for the federal government and the states. Research findings that children in married families generally fare better than those in single-parent families on measures of poverty, hardship, and well-being have provided the rationale for marriage promotion policies. This brief examines the racial and ethnic differences in children's living arrangements."]

[Request #S4136]

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FOOD STAMPS

Estimating the Probabilities and Patterns of Food Stamp Use Across the Life Course. By Mark Rank, Washington University, and Thomas Hirschl, Cornell University. Joint Center for Poverty Research Working Paper. 327. Prepared for the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Joint Center for Poverty Research. (The Center, Chicago, Illinois) 2003. 37 p.

Full Text at: www.jcpr.org/wpfiles/rank_hirschl.pdf?CFID=1778207&CFTOKEN=65422323

["49% of all US children received food stamps by age 20, including 90% of black children and 37% of white children; 91% of all children in single parent households received food stamps by age 20; half of all adult Americans received food stamps for at least one year between the ages of 20 and 65; the likelihood of food stamp receipt by children doubles (from 31% to 62%) when the head of household has less than 12 years of education; and, among adults who used food stamps, 10% received them for 5 or more consecutive years." Institute for the Study of Homelessness and Poverty (October 5, 2004) 1.]

[Request #S4137]

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IMMIGRATION

Socioeconomic Well-Being of California's Immigrant Youth. By Laura E. Hill, Public Policy Institute of California. (The Institute, San Francisco, California) 2004.

["California’s immigrant youth often make transitions to adulthood in different orders, at different paces, and with different levels of success than their native-born counterparts. Given the large size of this population, these differences have far-reaching consequences for households, communities, and public policy."]

Research Brief. 2 p.:
http://www.ppic.org/content/pubs/RB_704LHRB.pdf

Full Report. 120 p.:
http://www.ppic.org/content/pubs/R_704LHR.pdf

[Request #S4138]

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Children of Immigrant Families [Issue Theme.] IN: The Future of Children, vol. 14, no. 2 (Summer/Fall 2004) pp. 1-160.

Full Text at: www.futureofchildren.org/homepage2824/index.htm

["The number of children in immigrant families has grown rapidly in nearly every state across the country. According to the 2000 Census, 1 of every 5 children in the United States is an immigrant, or a child of immigrant parents. This issue examines the strengths and challenges that set children of immigrant families apart from the mainstream population." The Future of Children Newsletter (October 4, 2004).]

[Request #S4139]

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LOW INCOME

Rate of Low-Income Families Varies Widely by State. By the National Center for Children in Poverty. (The Center, New York, New York) September 2004. 4 p.

Full Text at: www.nccp.org/media/svf04a-text.pdf

["While nearly 40 percent of America’s children live in low-income families, they face very different demographic conditions depending on the state in which they live. State characteristics, including education levels, family structure, and immigration, contribute to differences in low-income rates among the states."]

[Request #S4140]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

ECONOMY

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Smart Money: Education and Economic Development. By William Schweke. (Economic Policy Institute, Washington, DC) July 2004. 80 p.

["As state and local governments face tight budgets, this book shows adequate and effective funding of education is the best way to achieve faster growth, more jobs, greater productivity, and more widely shared prosperity. It also demonstrates how more investment in education, from preschool to college, spurs economic development through increases in productivity, learned skills, technology and workers' average earnings." Child Development Policy Institute listserv (September 12, 2004). NOTE: Smart Money ... will be available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S4141]

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HEALTH

OBESITY

Preventing Childhood Obesity: Health in the Balance. Edited by Jeffrey P. Koplan and others, Committee on Prevention of Obesity in Children and Youth, Institute of Medicine. (National Academies Press, Washington, DC) 2005. 482 p.

Full Text at: www.nap.edu/books/0309091969/html/

["This book provides a broad-based examination of the nature, extent, and consequences of obesity in U.S. children and youth, including the social, environmental, medical, and dietary factors responsible for its increased prevalence. The book also offers a prevention-oriented action plan that identifies the most promising array of short-term and longer-term interventions, as well as recommendations for the roles and responsibilities of numerous stakeholders in various sectors of society, to reduce its future occurrence." NOTE: Preventing Childhood Obesity ... will be available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S4142]

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HUMAN SERVICES

CHILD CARE

"Child Care Policies and Practices for Management of Ill Children." By J.F. Friedman and others. IN: Ambulatory Pediatrics, vol. 4, no. 5 (September/October 2004) pp. 455-460.

["The authors found that 80% of child care staff believed that antibiotics are indicated for bronchitis and green rhinorrhea in children. In addition, 27% believed that colds and flu illnesses get better faster with antibiotics, and 25% believed antibiotics are helpful in treating viral infections. The authors conclude that rather than viewing child care staff as major contributors to inappropriate parental demand for antibiotics, they should be viewed as potential partners in educating families about the treatment of common infections and the need for judicious antibiotic use.'" Maternal and Child Health Alert (October 1, 2004).]

[Request #S4143]

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