Subject: Studies in the News 04-39 (June 8, 2004)


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News:
Children and Family Supplement


Contents This Week

Introductory Material ECONOMY
   Children and fiscal policies
   Measuring economic importance of early care
   Framing child care as economic development
EDUCATION
   Academic achievement through social and emotional learning
   Retention as academic achievement strategy
   Media guide for early care advocates
   Impact of early care and education on families
   Quality pre-k and crime prevention linkages
   Database for early childhood research/policy
   Standards for pre-k programs
   Community benefits from school & family partnerships
   Social characteristics of school readiness
   Improving school readiness outcomes
ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES
   Effect of household chemicals on children
HEALTH
   Condition of SCHIP
   Quality in children's health care
   State budgets and SCHIP enrollment
   Survey of Californians' health
   Temperament in early development
   Medi-Cal utilization among foster children
   States' mental health services for children
   Early mental health treatment training guide
   Economics of obesity
HUMAN SERVICES
   Importance of caregiver-child interactions on development
   Improving the child care workforce
   Linking housing and child care
   Guide to the child welfare system
   Assessment of children and families
   Status of California children
   Potential benefits of marriage
   Educational research
   Failure of social policy and services
STUDIES TO COME
   Migrant children and emergency health care
   Children's well-being indicators
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News (SITN) is a current compilation of policy-related items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau and State Information & Reference Center to supplement the public policy debate in California's Capitol. To help share the latest information with state employees and other interested individuals, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library's website.

How to Obtain Materials Listed in SITN:

  • When available on the Internet, the URL for the full-text of each item is provided.

  • California State Employees may contact the State Information & Reference Center (916-654-0206; cslsirc@library.ca.gov) with the SITN issue number and the item number [S#].

  • All other interested individuals should contact their local library - the items may be available there, or may be borrowed by your local library on your behalf.

The following studies are currently on hand:

ECONOMY

CHILDREN

Effects of Recent Fiscal Policies on Today's Children and Future Generations. By William G. Gale, Brookings Institution, and Laurence J. Kotlikoff, Boston University. (The Institution, Washington, DC) May 21, 2004. 37 p.

Full Text at: www.brookings.edu/dybdocroot/views/papers/gale/20040521.pdf

["According to this study, recent and proposed fiscal policies -- the tax cuts, proposals to make them permanent, and the Medicare prescription drug bill -- will hurt economic prospects for most of today’s children and all future generations. The programs will leave economic growth largely unchanged, but will redistribute resources from future to current generations and, within each generation, from low- and middle-income families toward an affluent minority."]

[Request #S3141]

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Measuring the Regional Economic Importance of Early Care and Education: The Cornell Methodology Guide. By Rosaria Ribeiro and Mildred Warner. Linking Economic Development and Child Care Research Project. (Department of City and Regional Planning, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York) 2004. 92 p.

Full Text at: www.cce.cornell.edu/restructuring/doc/pdf/MethodologyGuide.pdf

["This guide is designed for those seeking to measure the size and economic importance of child care as an economic sector. The guide includes a basic set of tools, including sections on: building a research team, data collection, estimating parents served, input-output analysis, government investments, and economic development strategies for the child care sector. Appendices include: a matrix of child care economic impact studies, national economic data, decennial census data, and national surveys on early care and education."]

[Request #S3142]

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Framing Child Care as Economic Development: Lessons from Early Studies. By Louise Stoney. Linking Economic Development and Child Care Research Project. (Department of City and Regional Planning, Cornell University, Ithica, New York) 2004. 21 p.

Full Text at: www.cce.cornell.edu/restructuring/doc/pdf/FramingChildCare.pdf

["This report represents a brief, early look at how child care economic impact studies are being implemented. The research is based on a review of studies and resource materials that have been completed to date, as well as interviews with over a dozen individuals engaged in conducting and implementing child care economic studies throughout the United States."]

[Request #S3143]

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EDUCATION

ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

"Promoting Academic Achievement Through Social and Emotional Learning." By Katharine Ragozzino and others. IN: Educational Horizons, vol. 81, no. 4 (Summer 2003) pp. 169-171.

Full Text at: www.pilambda.org/horizons/v81-4/Ragozzino.pdf

["In this day of high-stakes testing, educators are eager and even anxious to find new policies, instructional methods, and educational practices to improve academic performance. Consequently, they are turning their attention to methods and practices that foster students’ social and emotional development."]

[Request #S3144]

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ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE

Ending Social Promotion: The Effects of Retention. By Jenny Nagaoka and Melissa Roderick. Charting Reform in Chicago Series. (The Consortium on Chicago School Research, Chicago, Illinois) 2004. 68 p.

Full Text at: www.consortium-chicago.org/publications/pdfs/p70.pdf

["This report describes the experiences of third- and sixth-grade students who did not meet Chicago Public Schools’ promotional test-score cutoffs and were retained in grade. Researchers examine how the practices resulting from the policy affected the retention experience and evaluate the impact of retention on students’ achievement growth and experiences in school."]

[Request #S3168]

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EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

Making the Case for Early Care and Education: A Message Development Guide for Advocates. By Lori Dorfman and others, Berkeley Media Studies Group. (The Group, Berkeley, California) 2004.

["This guide to media advocacy includes the following topics: developing media strategies; framing the issues; building effective messages; applying these techniques to specific policies; and others." Action Alliance For Children (May 25, 2004) 1.]

Part I. 120 p.:
http://www.bmsg.org/content/YellowBook_1.pdf

Part II. 34 p.:
http://www.bmsg.org/content/YellowBook_2.pdf

[Request #S3145]

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What is the Impact of Out-of-home Integrated Care and Education Settings on Children Aged 0-6 and their Parents? By Helen Penn, University of London, and others. (Early Years Review Group, London, United Kingdom) 2004. 70 p.

Full Text at: eppi.ioe.ac.uk/EPPIWebContent/reel/review_groups/early_years/EY_rv1/EY_rv1.pdf

["This report looks at research that assesses the impact of out-of-home integrated care and education settings on children aged from birth to six. Integration is currently a topical issue in the field of early childhood provision, but there is considerable confusion about how and why integration should be pursued, and what works in what contexts. Most of the research literature is framed within one of three particular approaches: the effects of day care on children and their mothers; the effects of various kinds of educational curricula; and the effects of intervention on multi-risk families."]

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High-quality Pre-kindergarten: The Key to Crime Prevention and School Success in Florida. By Amy Dawson and others. (Fight Crime: Invest in Kids, Washington, DC) 2004. 16 p.

Full Text at: www.fightcrime.org/reports/FLPreK.pdf

["Those on the front lines in the fight against crime know that among their most powerful weapons are investments in programs like pre-kindergarten that help kids get the right start in life so they never become criminals. That is why the Florida Police Chiefs Association, the Florida Prosecuting Attorneys Association, and the Florida Sheriffs Association endorse high-quality pre-kindergarten programs."]

[Request #S3147]

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Child Care and Early Education Research Connections: A Comprehensive Resource for Researchers and Policy Makers. By the National Center for Children in Poverty and others. (The Center, New York, New York) 2004. Interactive Website.

Full Text at: www.childcareresearch.org/discover/index.jsp

["To promote high quality research in child care and early education and its use in policymaking, the National Center for Children in Poverty, the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research at the University of Michigan, and the Child Care Bureau of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services have launched the National Center for Child Care and Early Education Research Connections Web site. Designed to serve researchers and policymakers, the site is built on a relational database and includes a searchable research collection, data sets for secondary analysis, specially developed syntheses, and a 50-state data tool to compare policies within and across states." Connect for Kids Weekly (May 3, 2004)1.]

[Request #S3148]

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EDUCATIONAL STANDARDS

Child Outcome Standards in Pre-K Programs: What are Standards? What is Needed to Make Things Work? By Rima Shore, Bank Street College of Education, and others. Preschool Policy Matters. Issue 5. (National Institute for Early Education Research, New Brunswick, New Jersey) 2004. 12 p.

Full Text at: nieer.org/resources/policybriefs/5.pdf

["This policy brief provides an overview of the extension of the standards movement to preschool programs. It presents the conditions and special considerations necessary for standards to have a positive impact on preschool children and strengthen accountability. Policy recommendations include writing standards in ways that allow for appropriate, effective assessment and take into account the unique ways young children develop and learn." NIEER Online Newsletter (May 19, 2004) 1.]

[Request #S3149]

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PUBLIC/PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP

"Partnering with Families and Communities." By Joyce L. Epstein and Karen Clark Salinas. IN: Educational Leadership, vol. 61, no. 8 (May 2004) pp. 12-18.

["The National Network of Partnership Schools shares promising ways to reach out to families and communities. According to the article, a well-organized program of family and community partnerships yields many benefits for schools and their students." ASCD SmartBrief (May 13, 2004) 1.]

[Request #S3152]

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SCHOOL READINESS

Are L.A.'s Children Ready for School? By Sandraluz Lara-Cinisomo and others. (RAND, Santa Monica, California) 2004. 50 p.

Full Text at: www.rand.org/publications/MG/MG145/MG145.pdf

["School readiness is important for children, for their families, and for society at large. The authors' exploration of school readiness focuses on how the home literacy environment, parenting behavior, and social characteristics affect two aspects of school readiness: basic skills, such as reading and math; and behavior problems. The analysis shows that mothers' educational attainment and neighborhood poverty are the two social characteristics most strongly associated with school readiness." NOTE: Are L.A.'s Children Ready for School? is available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S3153]

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Improving School Readiness Outcomes: Lessons From Six Communities. By Ann Segal, Wellspring Advisors and the Annie E. Casey Foundation. (The Foundation, Baltimore, Maryland) 2004. 59 p.

Full Text at: www.aecf.org/publications/data/school_readiness_full.pdf

["This report describes six local government efforts to develop early learning systems to achieve the goal of school readiness - efforts that use state and federal resources but are locally owned. The report provides details about the six efforts — Miami-Dade County in Florida, Richland County in South Carolina, Orange County and Santa Clara County in California, Lancaster County in Pennsylvania, and the Hampton Roads region in Virginia."]

[Request #S3171]

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ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

Compromising our Children: Chemical Impacts on Children's Intelligence and Behaviour. By the World Wildlife Fund, United Kingdom. (The Fund, Godaling, Surrey) June 2004. 29 p.

Full Text at: www.wwf.org.uk/filelibrary/pdf/compromising_our_children.pdf

["According to this report, children's brain development is being seriously affected by man-made chemicals common in homes. Impacts on child brain development include poorer memory, reduced visual recognition, less developed movement skills and lower IQ scores. The report draws attention to the apparent increase in disabilities such as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and autism, and the possible role of chemicals in this trend." The Scotsman (June 2, 2004) 1.]

[Request #S3151]

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HEALTH

CHILDREN

Is SCHIP Shipshape? By Hy Gia Park and Leah Oliver, National Conference of State Legislatures. (NCSL, Denver, Colorado) May 2004. 4 p.

["At least six states -- Alabama, Colorado, Florida, Maryland, Montana and Utah -- froze enrollment to help cope with budget gaps. A number of states also have scaled back their SCHIP programs by tightening eligibility and reducing benefits. SCHIP, which operates with both state and federal funds, gives states flexibility to design programs. And SCHIP's 'enhanced' federal matching rates tend to be higher than Medicaid's, allowing states to do more with their money."]

[Request #S3154]

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Quality in Children's Health Care. By Tara Straw and Michelle Herman, Forum for State Health Policy Leadership, National Conference of State Legislatures. (NCSL, Denver, Colorado) 2004. 12 p.

["During the last decade, states have taken a greater role in monitoring health care quality. Legislatures assist state agencies to regulate managed care organizations (MCOs) that operate in the state and, as purchasers of health care, to monitor quality in the state employee health plan as well. This paper focuses attention on quality improvement in Medicaid and SCHIP programs, offers a primer on why child quality measures are important, and suggests how this data can be used."]

[Request #S3155]

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"SCHIP: Enrollment Slows As State Budgets Dip." By Hy Gia Park and Leah Oliver. IN: State Health Notes, vol. 25, issue 420 (May 17, 2004) pp. 1-3.

Full Text at: www.statehealthnotes.org/issues/cgi-bin/udt/im.display.printable?client_id=statehealthnotes&story_id=140244

["There were 11 million children in the United States without any health insurance coverage in 1998. With the help of the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) that number fell to 8.5 million in 2002. Despite its success, SCHIP has not been immune to budget cuts. Recent studies indicate that an investment in SCHIP produces substantial returns over the long term. A 2003 study found that Minnesota saved $60 million in uncompensated care costs over five years through Minnesota Care, the state's Medicaid and SCHIP program."]

[Request #S3156]

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HEALTH SURVEY

Health of California's Adults, Adolescents, and Children: Findings From CHIS 2001. By Sue Holtby and others. California Health Interview Survey. (UCLA Health Center for Health Policy Research, Los Angeles, California) May 2004. 108 p.

Full Text at: www.chis.ucla.edu/pdf/ber_chis2001_05182004.pdf

["CHIS data show that the population of California varies considerably on important measures of public health. In addition to age and gender differences reported in other health surveys, CHIS identifies significant differences across income and racial groups, and clearly shows the impact of being uninsured on the diagnosis of chronic conditions and access to health care. The demographic variations seen in adherence to healthy behaviors are valuable to professionals and advocates designing public health interventions. Due to the large sample size of CHIS, statistical differences among groups can be measured with a known degree of precision, making it possible to identify populations where greater attention is needed."]

[Request #S3172]

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INFANTS & CHILDREN

Temperament in Early Development [Issue Theme.] IN: Zero to Three: National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families, vol. 24, no. 4 (March 2004) pp. 1-55.

[Includes: "Temperament in Early Childhood: A Primer for the Perplexed;" "The 'Ideal' Baby: A Look at the Intersection of Temperament and Culture;" "Thinking About Challenging Behavior in Toddlers: Temperament Style or Behavior Disorder?;" and others. NOTE: Zero to Three ... is available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S3157]

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MEDI-CAL

Medi-Cal Utilization Among Foster Children: Evaluating Recent California Policy Initiatives: Social Policy. By Jeff Geppert and others, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research. California Policy Review. (The Institute, Burlingame, California) April 2004. 11 p.

["Recognizing that the medical needs of foster children are often unmet, the California legislature passed three reforms: The Health Care Program for Children in Foster Care; The Kinship Guardianship Assistance Payment Program (Kin-GAP); and Medi-Cal benefits were automatically extended to former foster children 18 to 20. This report examines the effects of these reforms on the circumstances of foster children."]

[Request #S3158]

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MENTAL HEALTH

An Analysis of Mental Health Issues in States' Child and Family Service Reviews and Program Improvement Plans. By Jan McCarthy and others. (Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, Washington, DC) April 2004. 37 p.

Full Text at: gucchd.georgetown.edu/documents/CFSR_MH_ANALYSIS_FINAL_4-04.pdf

["States report an ongoing lack of mental health services for children in the child welfare system, but strategies to address this deficit are being developed, according to this analysis. Results showed a great deal of variability across states. For instance, 10 of the 38 states reviewed required mental health screenings for all children entering foster care; however, only 1 state's final report indicated that all children actually received an initial formal mental health screening. Twelve states listed available services but did not report that these were provided to all children who needed them." Children's Bureau Express (June 2, 2004).]

[Request #S3159]

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Early Childhood Mental Health Treatment: Training Reference Guide. By Children's Mental Health Ontario. (Children's Mental Health Ontario, Toronto, Ontario) Summer 2002. 117 p.

Full Text at: www.cmho.org/pdf_files/ECMHT-TRG.pdf

["Chapters cover topics such as early childhood development, attachment, child psychopathology, parental mental health, and screening and assessment." Zero to Three (March 2004) 55.]

[Request #S3160]

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OBESITY

The Economics of Obesity: A Report on the Workshop Held at USDA's Economic Research Service. By Tomas Philipson and others. E-FAN No. (04004). (Economic Research Service, Washington, DC) May 2004. 45 p.

Full Text at: ers.usda.gov/publications/efan04004/efan04004.pdf

["Since the mid-1970s, the prevalence of overweight has tripled among children and adolescents, and nearly two out of three adult Americans are either overweight or obese. Although high health, social, and economic costs are known to be associated with obesity, the underlying causes of weight gain are less understood. At a basic level, weight gain and obesity are the result of individual choices. Consequently, economics, as a discipline that studies how individuals use limited resources to attain alternative ends, can provide unique insight into the actions and forces that cause individuals to gain excessive weight. The purpose of the conference was to provide an overview of leading health economics research on the causes and consequences of rising obesity in the United States. Topics included the role of technological change in explaining both the long- and short-term trends in obesity, the role of maternal employment in child obesity, the impact of obesity on wages and health insurance, behavioral economics as applied to obesity, and the challenges in measuring energy intakes and physical activity. The workshop also discussed policy implications and future directions for obesity research. This report presents a summary of the papers and the discussions presented at the workshop."]

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HUMAN SERVICES

CHILD CARE

The Importance of Caregiver-Child Interactions for the Survival and Healthy Development of Young Children: A Review. By Linda Richter, Human Sciences Research Council. (World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland) [2004.] Various pagings.

["This report discusses the impact of culture on development and provides a summary of key themes in the infant-family field. Chapters address the role of caregiving in the development of children; the importance of stable, loving care for young children; advances in theory and research; social and personal determinants of quality of caregiver-child interactions." Zero to Three (March 2004) 55.]

Preliminary. 14 p.:
http://www.hsrcpublishers.co.za/e-library/WHO/prelims.pdf

Chapter 1-2. 6 p.:
http://www.hsrcpublishers.co.za/e-library/WHO/chapter_1+2.pdf

Chapter 3. 11 p.:
http://www.hsrcpublishers.co.za/e-library/WHO/chapter_3.pdf

Chapter 4. 14 p.:
http://www.hsrcpublishers.co.za/e-library/WHO/chapter_4.pdf

Chapter 5. 10 p.:
http://www.hsrcpublishers.co.za/e-library/WHO/chapter_5.pdf

Chapter 6-7. 7 p.:
http://www.hsrcpublishers.co.za/e-library/WHO/chapter_6+7.pdf

Glossary & Bibliography. 44 p.:
http://www.hsrcpublishers.co.za/e-library/WHO/glossary%2Bibliography.pdf

[Request #S3162]

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Building a Stronger Child Care Workforce: A Review of Studies of the Effectiveness of Public Compensation. By Barbara Gault and others. Research-in-Brief. IWPR Publication. No. G715. (Institute for Women's Policy Research, Washington, DC) May 2004. 5 p.

Full Text at: www.iwpr.org/pdf/G715.pdf

["This brief summarizes the outcomes of seven programs to improve child care worker wages, education, and retention. Outcomes were assessed by reviewing findings from program evaluations. This review suggests that on the whole child care practitioners who participated in these programs saw improved income, education, and retention levels. There is also evidence that the programs increased participants’ morale and feelings of professionalism."]

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Child Care and Housing Linkage Research Study. By Brion & Associates and Vernazza Wolf Associates. Prepared for the County of San Mateo and the San Mateo County Child Care Coordinating Council. (Brion & Associates, Oakland, California) June 2003. 108 p.

Full Text at: www.co.sanmateo.ca.us/vgn/images/portal/cit_609/78944379childcare_housing_link.pdf

["The purpose of this study is to examine ways to increase the provision of child care in the San Mateo County by linking child care both to residential development and to local policies that affect residential land use."]

[Request #S3164]

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CHILDREN

A Family's Guide to the Child Welfare System. By Jan McCarthy and others, National Technical Assistance Center for Children's Mental Health, Georgetown University. (The Center, Washington, DC) December 2003. 140 p.

Full Text at: air.org/tapartnership/advisors/ChildWelfare/resources/AFamilysGuideFINAL%20WEB%20VERSION.pdf

["This guide is organized into 10 sections and includes a general description of the child welfare system and information about child protective services, the service planning process, home- and community-based services, out-of-home placement services, choices for permanent placements, the Indian Child Welfare Act, parents' rights and responsibilities, and approaches used by child welfare agencies to help families reach their goals."]

[Request #S3165]

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FAMILIES

Child and Family Assessment in Social Work Practice. By Sally Holland. (Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, California) 2004. 176 p.

["This book has a particular focus on in-depth 'core' assessments and guides the reader through the complexities of conducting detailed assessments of need and risk. It is a guide for practice that is strongly rooted in research evidence and is divided into three parts. The first explores different approaches to assessment work. It outlines the policy and practice and places them in context with child and the family. In Part Two the focus is on the people involved in child and family assessments: the children, their parents and the relationship between the assessors and the assessed. The assessment processes is outlined in the final part focusing particularly on planning, analysis, reporting and critical evaluation." NOTE: Child and Family Assessment ... is available for 3-day loan.]

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IMMIGRATION

California Report Card: Focus on Children in Immigrant Families. By Sarah Grossman-Swenson and others. (Children Now, Oakland, California) 2004. 48 p.

Full Text at: www.childrennow.org/assets/pdf/rc04/ca-rc-2004.pdf

["This report found that nearly half of all children in California have at least one parent who was born outside the United States. These children are much less likely to have access to health care and child care and much more likely to live in poverty than children in U.S.-born families. Researchers also found that some policies to reduce child poverty favored by lawmakers may be ineffective in California, where three in four poor children live in immigrant families."]

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PARENTS

What Do "I Do"s Do? Potential Benefit of Marriage for Cohabiting Couples with Children. By Gregory Acs and Sandi Nelson, Urban Institute. New Federalism: National Survey of America's Families. No. B-59. (The Institute, Washington, DC) May 24, 2004. 9 p.

Full Text at: www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/311001_B-59.pdf

["Data from the 2002 National Survey of America's Families show that over 70 percent of the difference in poverty, low-income status, and food insecurity between children living with married and cohabiting couples can be attributed to differences in work status, education, age and race/ethnicity of these couples. The remaining difference can be attributed to unmeasured family characteristics and the intrinsic benefits of marriage." Assessing the New Federalism (May 27, 2004.]

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RESEARCH

Doing Educational Research: A Guide to First Time Researchers. Edited by Clive Opie and others. (Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, California) 2004. 244 p.

["Key features of the book include: 1) all the essentials for the first-time researcher; 2) pedagogical and student-focused features; 3) examples and case studies to illustrate how the methods and techniques can be used in 'real-life' context; 4) practical guidance on time management, planning research projects and writing reports; and 5) a broad coverage of qualitative and quantitative methodologies, data analysis using computer software, ethical issues and the writing-up and presentation of data."]

[Request #S3170]

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SOCIAL POLICY

Justice at the City Gate: Social Policy, Social Services, and the Law. By Susan G. Neisuler. (Writers Advantage, New York, New York) 2003. 275 p.

["A third of America's children grow up in poverty. Social service workers intervene in family crises to help repair emotional damage, but often exacerbate that damage. Why does poverty continue to be a plague in twenty-first-century America? Why do social service agencies fail in their mission to bring succor to needy families? How did we get to this point? These are questions explored by Attorney Susan G. Neisuler, a lawyer with ten years of experience in the Juvenile Court of Boston." NOTE: Justice at the City Gate ... is available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S3176]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

HEALTH

MIGRANT & SEASONAL LABOR

"Children of Migratory Agricultural Workers: The Ecological Context of Acute Care for a Mobile Population of Immigrant Children." By Andrea C. Weathers and others, Department of Maternal and Child Health, UNC School of Public Health, North Carolina. IN: Clinical Pediatric Emergency Medicine, vol. 5, no. 2 (June 2004) pp.120-129.

["The ecological context of migrant children’s lives is characterized by poverty, social isolation, heightened inter- and intra-national mobility, limited protections from occupational safety and health legislation, and health access barriers. Moreover, the linkage of citizenship and immigration status to the receipt of public insurance and selected social services benefits has the potential to increase access barriers for migrant workers and their families. Despite these obvious vulnerabilities, few health services research studies address this population. The effective delivery of acute care to the children of migratory agricultural workers requires awareness of and attention to their unique health access barriers, issues of continuity and compliance with care, and their unique health and injury risks."]

[Request #S3177]

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HUMAN SERVICES

CHILDREN

Kids Count Data Book Online 2004. By the Annie E. Casey Foundation. (The Foundation, Baltimore, Maryland) 2004. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.aecf.org/kidscount/databook/

["Although economic growth and the expansion of public programs between 1996 and 2001 led to big gains on many key indicators of well-being for America's kids, there are still enormous differences among the states. The Data Book finds that incidents of low birth weight and the number of single parent families have risen, and the sluggish economy is forcing cutbacks in child care, health coverage and other programs that could undercut future gains. This year, Kids Count focuses on youth at risk—teens aging out of foster care, dropping out of high school, becoming parents, or entering the juvenile justice system. Between 2000 and 2003, the number of youth at risk rose 19 percent. While state and community services often fall short of reaching kids in need, the essay highlights several programs that are effective in improving the odds. The online data book is interactive, allowing you to create state and community profiles using any of the 10 indicators." Connect for Kids (June 7, 2004). NOTE: Kids Count ... will be available for 3-day loan.]

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