Subject: Studies in the News 04-6 (January 29, 2004)


CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News
Children and Family Supplement


Contents This Week

Introductory Material CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT
   Children of incarcerated mothers
CULTURE AND SOCIETY
   American Indian children in Los Angeles
EDUCATION
   Outcomes framework for Head Start
   Vision of Head Start
HEALTH
   Insurance coverage for welfare recipient's children
   Health insurance and children's coverage
   Children and fast-food consumption
HUMAN SERVICES
   CCDBG and TANF stalled in Congress
   Low-income children and parental employment
   Poor neighborhoods in southern California
STUDIES TO COME
   Children's exposure to violence
   Effective treatment for ADHD children
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News is a very current compilation of items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau to supplement the public policy debate in California’s Capitol. To help share the latest information with state policymakers, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library’s website. This week's list of current articles in various public policy areas is presented below.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • Items in the State Library collection can be checked out to state officials and staff.

  • Access to all materials listed will be provided by the State Information Reference Center, either by e-mail to cslsirc@library.ca.gov or by calling 654-0261.

The following studies are currently on hand:

CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT

FAMILIES

"The Forgotten Victims: The Children of Incarcerated Mothers." By Maureen Norton-Hawk. IN: Women, Girls & Criminal Justice, vol. 4, no. 1 (January 2004) pp.5-6.

["This study finds a clear pattern of intergenerational dysfunction.... These children are the innocent victims.... Programs must be developed that are specifically designed to compensate for the limitations of their childhood environment.... America is setting the stage for much greater troubles in the future, because the pattern of intergenerational dysfunctional will continue to expand."]

[Request #S1077]

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CULTURE AND SOCIETY

AMERICAN INDIANS

The Status of American Indian Children in Los Angeles. By Paul M. Ong and others, The Ralph and Goldy Lewis Center for Regional Policy Studies, University of California, Los Angeles. Policy Briefs. Paper 03. (The Center, Los Angeles, California) 2003. 10 p.

Full Text at: repositories.cdlib.org/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1053&context=lewis

["This policy brief presents findings on the status of American Indian and Alaskan Native (AIAN) children in the Los Angeles metropolitan area.... According to the 2000 census, there were 111,000 AIANs in the region. These children and their parents face numerous social problems and economic challenges. This brief uses three decades of census data to provide an updated analysis of the socioeconomic status of AIAN children."]

[Request #S1078]

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EDUCATION

HEAD START

The Head Start Path to Positive Child Outcomes: The Head Start Child Outcomes Framework. By Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (The Department, Washington, DC) Updated Summer 2003. 27 p.

Full Text at: www.headstartinfo.org/pdf/hsoutcomespath28ppREV.pdf

["According to this framework, Head Start’s concern with the whole child includes social competence as part of school readiness. Head Start grantees and delegate agencies gather information to document their process for assuring positive child outcomes. This information addresses all aspects of development and learning, including physical, emotional, social, cognitive, and language, in order to provide an overall picture of the child from program entry to the culmination of the child’s Head Start experience."]

[Request #S1079]

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Head Start Leader's Guide to Positive Child Outcomes: Strategies to Support Positive Child Outcomes. By Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (The Department, Washington, DC) December 2003. 146 p.

Full Text at: www.headstartinfo.org/pdf/HSOutcomesguideFINAL4c.pdf

["This Guide is designed to help Head Start agencies improve the quality and effectiveness of child development services. Its purpose is to guide and inform education managers and program directors as they lead efforts to implement the Head Start Program Performance Standards and to help staff and families prepare children for success in school. It offers a picture of what a high quality Head Start program looks like in action and in detail: intentional, outcomes-oriented teaching and engaging, challenging learning opportunities for groups and individual children."]

[Request #S1080]

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HEALTH

CHILDREN

Sources of Insurance Coverage Among Children of Recent Welfare Recipients. By Shannon McConville, The Ralph and Goldy Lewis Center for Regional Policy Studies, University of California, Los Angeles. (The Center, Los Angeles, California) 2003. 6 p.

Full Text at: repositories.cdlib.org/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1052&context=lewis

["This issue brief analyzes the coverage sources of children of recent welfare recipients in Los Angeles County and examines the relationship between parents and children's sources of coverage by addressing three primary policy questions: 1) How does the source of coverage of parents who were recent welfare recipients reflect the source of coverage for their children?; 2) Do parents who are off welfare and no longer covered by Medi-Cal maintain public insurance coverage for their children?; 3) How do combinations of coverage sources for recent welfare recipients and their children differ by recipient employment outcomes?"]

[Request #S1081]

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Improving Children's Health: A Chartbook About the Roles of Medicaid and SCHIP. By Leighton Ku and Sashi Nimalendran. (Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, Washington, DC) January 2004. 20 p.

Full Text at: www.cbpp.org/1-15-04health.pdf

["Despite the weak economy and gaps in private health insurance coverage, children's coverage under SCHIP and Medicaid grew between 1997 and early 2003, reducing the percentage of low-income children without insurance by a third. This progress is now being threatened by budget cuts in many states that reduce the eligibility or enrollment of low-income children in the public health insurance programs." Connect For Kids Weekly (January 26, 2004).]

[Request #S1082]

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"Effects of Fast-Food Consumption on Energy Intake and Diet Quality Among Children in a National Household Survey." By Shanthy A. Bowman and others. IN: Pediatrics, vol. 113, no. 1 (January 2004) pp. 112-118.

Full Text at: www.commercialalert.org/FastFoodLudwig.pdf

["Fast food is fast becoming a prominent feature in children's diets. However, few studies have examined the effects of fast-food consumption on any nutrition or health-related outcome. Researchers have found that when children eat fast food, they tend to eat less fiber and milk and fewer fruits and nonstarchy vegetables that day." Connect for Kids Weekly (January 12, 2004) online.]

[Request #S1083]

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HUMAN SERVICES

CHILD CARE

Progress Frozen: The Context For Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) Reauthorization in 2004. By National Women's Law Center. (The Center, Washington, DC) January 2004. 4 p.

Full Text at: www.nwlc.org/pdf/CCDBGReauthorization2004.pdf

["According to this paper, the most significant federal public investment that helps low-income families pay for child care is the Child Care Development Block Grant. Its renewal was due to be completed in 2001 along with the welfare bill, TANF. However, due to battles over funding priorities and disagreements over welfare policies, it has been stalled. Despite the importance of high quality, affordable child care, only one in seven eligible children currently receive help through CCDBG."]

[Request #S1084]

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LOW INCOME

Parental Employment in Low-Income Families. By Ayana Douglas-Hall and Heather Koball, National Center for Children in Poverty. (The Center, New York, New York) January 2004. 2 p.

Full Text at: www.nccp.org/media/pel04-text.pdf

["With the economic downturn of the past few years, unemployment and underemployment are higher than they have been in nearly a decade, and the number of children living in low-income families is on the rise. However, according to this fact sheet, most children in low-income families have parents who are employed. In fact, 56% of all children in low-income families have at least one parent who works full-time and year-round."]

[Request #S1085]

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POVERTY

The Trajectory of Poor Neighborhoods in Southern California, 1970-2000. By Shannon McConville and Paul M. Ong, The Ralph and Goldy Lewis Center for Regional Policy Studies, University of California, Los Angeles. Community Service Projects/Paper 15. (The University, Los Angeles, California) December 4, 2003.

Full Text at: repositories.cdlib.org/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1049&context=lewis

["The poor population in the Los Angeles region has become more geographically concentrated.... The proportion ... who live in poor neighborhoods doubled over 30 years, from 29 percent in 1970 to 57 percent in 2000. The increases in employment levels and labor force participation rates in impoverished neighborhoods over the past few decades are promising, but they must be accompanied by increases in real wages at the bottom end of the labor market and opportunities for middle-class jobs and economic mobility."]

[Request #S1086]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT

COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS

"Prevalence of Child and Adolescent Exposure to Community Violence." By Bradley D. Stein and others. IN: Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, vol. 6, no. 4. (December 2003) pp. 247-264.

["This paper provides an overview of the current literature regarding prevalence of youth exposure to community violence, and identifies those areas where further research is warranted. In addition to examining overall rates of community violence exposure, this paper reviews the prevalence of different types of community violence, such as weapon use, physical aggression, and crime-related events. Predictors of community violence exposure, including gender, age, race, socioeconomic status, behavior patterns, and geography, are discussed." RAND Child Policy Project Update--January (January 26, 2004) online.]

[Request #S1087]

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HEALTH

CHILDREN

"Psychopathology and Substance Abuse in Parents of Young Children With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder." By Andrea M. Chronis, University of Maryland, and others. IN: Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, vol. 42, no. 12. (December 2003) pp. 1424-1432.

["Treatment for many young children with Attention Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) should also include treatment for their parents, according to this study. In one of the first systematic studies of pre-school children with ADHD, the research team found that parents of children with the condition are 24 times more likely to have the disorder themselves, as compared to the parents of children without ADHD. The study also showed that when ADHD preschoolers also suffer from other serious behavioral problems, the parents are two to five times more likely to suffer from a wide range of mental health problems. Since treatments for children with ADHD rely heavily on parental support, parents' problems can interfere with a child's improvement." Healthcare CustomWire (January 7, 2004).]

[Request #S1088]

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