Subject: Studies in the News 04-1 (January 5, 2004)


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News


California -- One Hundred and Fifty Years Ago

January 7, 1854 - "Inaugural Address of Governor John Bigler: On this occasion, I may be permitted to assure my fellow citizens, that hereafter, as heretofore, all my energies will be steadily exerted to secure, not only a faithful and efficient, but an economical administration of the State Government.... I have, again and again, performed my duty in the premises, by urging upon the immediate representatives of the people, the great importance of adopting judicious measures, to secure a speedy liquidation of the debt of the State, and of devising a thorough system of retrenchment and reform. http://www.governor.ca.gov/govsite/govsgallery/h/documents/inaugural_3b.html"    

January 1854 - "There is a whimsical notion among native Californians, that the coming of 'these Yankee devils' has completely changed the character of the seasons here, the winter months especially being, it is believed, now wetter and colder than before the American advent.... The frosts and snows of January, 1854, seemed to corroborate it. An unusual degree of cold was experienced in San Francisco for several days about this time. Ice, in some places an inch thick, was formed in the streets. Within doors, the water in pitchers was generally frozen.... Icicles a foot in length hung from the roofs of houses on which the sun had been shining all day. The small lagoons around the city were frozen over, and excellent skating was had on ponds near the mission. Chapter 29, The Annals of San Francisco."  http://www.zpub.com/sf50/sf/hbann2-29.htm  

Contents This Week

Introductory Material CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT
   Campus crime
   New war on social drinking and driving
   Objections to policing services
   Treatment regimens in correctional facilities
   Teenage prostitution
   Recidivism of sex offenders
CULTURE AND SOCIETY
   Guide for migrants visiting Mexico
DEMOGRAPHY
   Legal immigration to California
   Foreign-born population
   Population estimates
   Racial categories make no sense
ECONOMY
   Los Angeles area fashion industry profile
   California county projections
   Outsourcing services legislation criticized
   Organizational implications of high tech outsourcing
   CalPERS sues NYSE
   The Wal-Mart effect
   Summit on the information society
   Email spam will increase
   E-commerce and world development report
   Economy generating new jobs
EDUCATION
   Factors of educational achievement gaps
   Nation's report card on reading and math
   Paying for schools
   Flexible facility utilization standards
   Easing students' transition into college
   Discussion of school choice initiatives
   Status of the teaching profession
EMPLOYMENT
   Unemployed TANF leavers and insurance
   Unemployment insurance in California
   Workers exhausting unemployment benefits
   Living wage laws and economic development
ENERGY
   Integrated energy policy report
   Plant-wide energy assessments.
   High gas prices and supply
ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES
   State liable for levee break
   Cell phone recycling
   Mercury in Sierra Nevada fish
   Private use of public water
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
   International affairs and California legislative action
   History and future of civil legal assistance
   Election reforms announced
   Protecting public health in age of bioterrorism
   IT strategies to increase revenue and reduce costs
   State governance of information technology
   Privatization in state government
   Special survey of Orange County
   Terminating tax shelters
   Proposed changes in California tax policy
HEALTH
   Students fail to meet basic fitness
   Public survey of concerns about health care cuts
   HUD hospital mortgage insurance
   Court rules for medical marijuana
   $1 billion lost in Medicaid
   Beneficiaries and Medicare legislation
   State management and allocation of tobacco funds
HOUSING
   Affordable housing strategies
   Vacating the city
   Home sales in Southern California
HUMAN SERVICES
   Citations for poor care in nursing homes
   Homelessness in Los Angeles County
   Participation in food assistance programs
   Families turn to food lockers
STUDIES TO COME
   Bullying and violence among U.S. youth
   Troubled young adolescents
   Teacher quality
   Critical issues in restorative justice
   Factors affecting prevalence of overweight children
   Work environment of nurses and patient safety
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News is a very current compilation of items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau to supplement the public policy debate in California’s Capitol. To help share the latest information with state policymakers, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library’s website. This week's list of current articles in various public policy areas is presented below.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • Items in the State Library collection can be checked out to state officials and staff.

  • Access to all materials listed will be provided by the State Information Reference Center, either by e-mail to cslsirc@library.ca.gov or by calling 654-0261.

The following studies are currently on hand:

CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT

CRIME STATISTICS

California's Education Institutions: A Lack of Guidance Results in Their Inaccurate or Inconsistent Reporting of Campus Crime Statistics. By Bureau of State Audits, Office of the California State Auditor. (The Bureau, Sacramento, California) December 2003. 61 p.

Full Text at: www.bsa.ca.gov/bsa/pdfs/2002-032.pdf

["The first state audit on the performance of California college campuses in collecting crime statistics for public perusal gives high marks to California State University, Sacramento, one of six schools examined. But California State Auditor Elaine Howle said that the federal law that requires certain colleges to compile annual crime reports is vague on guidelines, which leads to confusion over what kind of crimes to report and what kind to leave out." Sacramento Bee (December 19, 2003) A1.]

[Request #S9868]

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DRIVING UNDER THE INFLUENCE

Back Door To Prohibition: The New War On Social Drinking. By Radley Balko, Cato Institute. Policy Analysis. No. 501. (The Institute, Washington, DC) December 5, 2003. 28 p.

Full Text at: www.cato.org/pubs/pas/pa501.pdf

["The state of Michigan has set a Blood Alcohol Concentration Level (BAC)limit of .02 percent for any state officials on duty.... Many jurisdictions have already enacted modified zero tolerance. For example, merely registering a BAC below .08 doesn’t always get a motorist off the hook. In several cities and counties across the country, police officers have the discretion to arrest drivers for 'driving under the influence' if the driver merely admits to having consumed alcohol or any amount of alcohol is registered in a breath test."]

[Request #S9869]

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POLICE

Congress is Set to Overspend Taxpayer Dollars on the Wasteful Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) Program. By David B. Muhlhausen, Heritage Foundation. (The Foundation, Washington, DC) December 9, 2003. 2 p.

Full Text at: www.heritage.org/Research/Crime/wm382.cfm?renderforprint=1

["Congress should follow the President's recommendations regarding eliminating grants to pay for the salaries of state and local police officers and reducing overall funding for Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS).... Programs such as COPS with a long history of poor performance are prime candidates for reductions because they not only have failed to achieve their goals, but also have assigned to the federal government functions that fall within the expertise, jurisdiction, and constitutional responsibilities of state and local governments."]

[Request #S9870]

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PRIVATIZATION

"Problems in Creating Boundaryless Treatment Regimens in Secure Correctional Environments: Private-Sector-Public Agency Infrastructure Compatibility." By Ernest L. Cowles and Laura Dorman. IN: The Prison Journal, vol. 83, no. 3 (September 2003) pp. 235-250.

["This paper examines private and public organizations and treatment and security paradigms.... The findings suggest that the initiation of partial mission privatization in a correctional environment, particularly as it relates to the provision of treatment services, is dubious at best."]

[Request #S9871]

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PROSTITUTION

"Throwaway Girls: They're Underage, They're Prostitutes, They're on the Street, and the Law Helps Keep Them There." IN: California Lawyer, (November 2003) pp. 24-25, 57-60.

["The attempt to curb underage prostitution within the criminal system has its drawbacks.... A new protocol in San Francisco shows promise.... Teens arrested for prostitution are receiving crisis counseling much earlier in the detention process through improved communication between city agencies and court mandates from juvenile judges."]

[Request #S9872]

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SEXUAL OFFENDERS

Recidivism of Sex Offenders Released from Prison in 1994. By Patrick A. Langan and others, Bureau of Justice Statistics, U.S Department of Justice. NCJ 198281. (The Bureau, Washington, DC) November 2003. 49 p.

Full Text at: www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/pub/pdf/rsorp94.pdf

["Five Percent of Sex Offenders Rearrested for Another Sex Crime Within 3 Years of Prison Release: This report presents, for the first time, data on the rearrest, reconviction, and reimprisonment of 9,691 male sex offenders, including 4,295 child molesters, who were tracked for 3 years after their release from prisons in 15 states in 1994."]

[Request #S9873]

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CULTURE AND SOCIETY

LATINOS

Guia Paisano. By Programa Paisano, Secretaría de la Función Pública. (La Secretaria, Mexico City, Mexico) 2003. 41 p.

Full Text at: www.paisano.gob.mx/guia/guia2003.pdf

["The holiday trip home for many Mexican migrants has gotten easier under President Vicente Fox. Instead of insisting on bribes, some police offer to guide caravans of migrant cars, and customs agents allow gifts that in the past were often confiscated. Since taking office, Fox has made changing government officials' attitudes toward migrants one of his top priorities. He has focused on the annual return trip home before Christmas, a time when the majority of migrant families return to Mexico, clogging highways with pickup trucks and U.S. sedans overflowing with bicycles, TVs and computers.... Paisano program director Florencia Martinez said 1 million migrants made the trek home last year during the holidays." Associated Press (December 18, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S9874]

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DEMOGRAPHY

IMMIGRANTS

Legal Immigration to California in 2002. By Linda Gage, Demographic Research Unit, California Department of Finance. (The Department, Sacramento, California) 2003. 30 p.

Full Text at: www.dof.ca.gov/HTML/DEMOGRAP/2002_INS_Report.pdf

["The report stipulates that the one million immigrants entering the United States in 2002 matched the entry total for 2001, while 72 percent of those entering in 2002 were family-sponsored cases. California received 27.4 percent of 2002 international migrants, ahead of New York, Florida and Texas combined, and making it the top choice of residence." Capitol Hill Bulletin (December 19, 2003) 3.]

[Request #S9875]

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The Foreign-Born Population: 2000. By Nolan Malone and others, U. S. Census Bureau (The Bureau, Washington, DC) December 2003. 12 p.

Full Text at: www.census.gov/prod/2003pubs/c2kbr-34.pdf

["The report chronicles the increase of the foreign-born population over the last decade, from 19.8 million in 1990 to 31.1 million in 2000.... California's population share of the foreign-born also increased during the 1990-2000 period, rising from 21.7 percent of its total population in 1990 to 26.2 percent in 2000." Capitol Hill Bulletin (December 19, 2003) 3.]

[Request #S9876]

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POPULATION

Population Estimates. By U. S. Census Bureau (The Bureau, Washington, DC) 2003. Various Pagings.

Full Text at: eire.census.gov/popest/data/states.php

[" According to the latest Census Bureau population estimates, California's population jumped by 482,000 to a total of 35,484,453 persons as of July 1, 2003. California's share of the nation's population now exceeds 12.2 percent." Capitol Hill Bulletin (December 19, 2003) 3.]

[Request #S9877]

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RACE & ETHNICITY

Why Racial Categories Make No Sense -- and Why the Census Bureau is Right Not to Care. By Andrew Sabl, Department of Sociology, University of California, Los Angeles. Theory and Research in Comparative Social Analysis. Paper 7. (The Department, Los Angeles, California) November 13, 2003. 32 p.

Full Text at: repositories.cdlib.org/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1012&context=uclasoc

["Few today would deny that races are socially constructed.... Even those who think the social construction argument has gone too far, that the existence of biological 'races' -- natural or genetic divisions of the human species -- remains possible concede that races 'as we know them' are social constructions: the things that make races socially important, and a basis for ongoing injustice, are not the same things that might make for certain natural or genetic differences."]

[Request #S9878]

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ECONOMY

APPAREL INDUSTRY

The Los Angeles Area Fashion Industry Profile. By Jack Kyser, Economic Information & Research Department, Los Angeles County Economic Development Corporation. (The Corporation, Los Angeles, California) December 2003. 30 p.

Full Text at: laedc.info/pdf/Fashion-2003.pdf

["The apparel industry in Los Angeles County is losing jobs and faces a bleak future because of competition from Asia, according to the study.... Still, 'while employment is declining, sales revenue is actually growing for many firms. It is a $24.3 billion industry that still has lots of potential,' said Jack Kyser, who authored the study." City News Service (December 11, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S9879]

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CALIFORNIA

California County Projections: 2003. By the Center for Continuing Study of the California Economy. (The Center, Palo Alto, California) 2003.

["The objective of these reports is to present a consistent, timely, and credible set of projections for key market variables for each county.... Nine market characteristics are covered: population, households, total personal income, per capita personal income, average household income, total taxable sales, taxable retail sales, total nonfarm wages, and salary jobs and manufacturing jobs.... The preface discusses economic and budget issues facing California after the recall election." NOTE: California County Projections 2003 is available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S9880]

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CORPORATE RESTRUCTURING

Creeping Protectionism: An Analysis of State and Federal Global Sourcing Legislation. By Stuart Anderson. (National Foundation for American Policy, Arlington, Virginia) 2003. 24 p.

Full Text at: www.nfap.net/researchactivities/studies/creepingProtect.pdf

[“Outsourcing globally enables an American company in information technology or financial services to operate 24 hours a day to meet the needs of a worldwide customer base, something that wage rates and work practices generally make prohibitive with U.S.-based employees alone.... Restrictive state legislation has emerged in North Carolina, Indiana, New Jersey, and Michigan. State legislators have sought to restrict overseas call centers by regulating calls that involve residents of their states.” ]

[Request #S9881]

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Organizational Implications of Offshore Outsourcing. By Diane Morello. (Gartner Inc., Stamford, Connecticut) 2003. 4 p.

Full Text at: www4.gartner.com/resources/118100/118136/118136.pdf

["International Business Machines Corp. has told its managers to plan on moving the work of as many as 4,730 programmers to India, China and elsewhere.... The trend looms as one of the most serious long-term threats to U.S. employment and labor. Countries with lower-paid workers are no longer siphoning just unskilled or blue-collar jobs from U.S. workers; they now are scooping up skilled work from U.S. companies on a large scale.... By the end of the coming year, one out of every 10 jobs within U.S.-based computer-services companies will move to emerging markets, as will one of every 20 technology jobs in other corporations, according to tech-industry researcher Gartner, Inc." Wall Street Journal, December 15, 2003 (online).]

[Request #S9882]

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CORPORATIONS

California Public Employees Retirement System v. The New York Stock Exchange, et al. U.S. District Court, Southern District of New York. Complaint for Violation of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. December 15, 2003 49 p.

Full Text at: www.calpers.ca.gov/whatsnew/press/newscenter/attachments/lawsuit-nyse-specialist.pdf

["California's public employee pension fund sued the New York Stock Exchange and seven leading Wall Street specialist firms charging that the firms routinely manipulated stock trades for profit while the NYSE knowingly turned a blind eye to the abuses.... CalPERS is seeking class action status for the suit. Potentially, the class could include every person who traded on the NYSE over the past five years." San Francisco Chronicle (December 17, 2003) A1.]

[Request #S9883]

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"The Wal-Mart Effect." By Nancy Cleeland and Abigail Goldman. IN: The Los Angeles Times (November 23-25, 2003) Various pagings.

[Includes: "An Empire Built on Bargains Remakes the Working World;" "Scouring the Globe to Give Shoppers an $8.63 Polo Shirt;" and "Grocery Unions Battle to Stop Invasion of the Giant Stores."]

[Request #S9884]

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INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

World Summit on the Information Society: Draft Declaration of Principles. By the United Nations International Telecommunication Union. (The Union, Geneva, Switzerland) 2003. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.itu.int/wsis/documents/doc_multi.asp?lang=en&id=1013|1014

["An attempt by developing countries to put management of the Internet under United Nations auspices is likely to be shelved at the world information summit in Geneva -- but the issue is now firmly on the international agenda, summit sources say. It will be one of the main bones of contention as government negotiators and non-governmental organizations descend on Geneva for the final round of preparatory talks on the draft declaration and plan of action due to be endorsed by heads of state and government at the summit." Financial Times (November 10, 2003) 9.]

[Request #S9885]

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Spam Will Likely Worsen Despite U.S. Law. By Maurene Caplan Grey and others. (Gartner Group, San Jose, California) 2003. 2 p.

[According to the analysis, the CAN-SPAM Act of 2003 [S. 877] ... would eliminate the need for e-marketers to comply with 36 state anti-spam laws, many of them more stringent than the new federal law.... Disreputable spammers will find no need to comply with the legislation; fraudulent e-mail is built on deception. Should spammers feel at risk, the spam e-mail will be sent through an offshore ISP, outside U.S. jurisdiction."]

Analysis. 2 p.:
http://www4.gartner.com/resources/118700/118762/118762.pdf

CAN-SPAM Act. 55 p.:
http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=108_cong_bills&docid=f:s877eas.txt.pdf

[Request #S9886]

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TELECOMMUNICATIONS INDUSTRY

E-Commerce and Development Report 2003. By the United Nations Conference on Trade And Development Secretariat. (The Conference, New York and Geneva) December 2003. 228 p.

Full Text at: r0.unctad.org/ecommerce/docs/edr03_en/ecdr03.pdf

["The report demonstrates that the economic gains of information and communication technologies (ICT) have broadly permeated business and society, and identifies some of the implications of the growth of the digital economy may have for developing countries.... IT-enabled services are projected to employ up to 1.1 million people in India by 2008. Worldwide, offshore outsourcing could generate some 3.3 million jobs by 2015."]

[Request #S9887]

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U.S. ECONOMY

2004 Will Be the U.S.'s Best Year Economically in Last 20 Years. By The Conference Board. (The Board, New York, New York) December 2003. 2 p.

Full Text at: www.conference-board.org/economics/press.cfm?press_ID=2284

["Revising its year-end economic forecast sharply upward, The Conference Board projected that real GDP growth will hit 5.7% next year, making 2004 the best year economically in the last 20 years. The forecast expects worker productivity, which set a 20-year record in the third quarter, to rise at a healthy 3.6% next year. That would follow a gain of 4.3% this year. While the U.S. economy is expected to generate more than one million new jobs next year, the unemployment rate will edge down only slightly, averaging 5.6% in 2004."]

[Request #S9888]

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EDUCATION

ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

Parsing the Achievement Gap: Baselines for Tracking Progress. By Paul E. Barton, Policy Information Center, Educational Testing Service. (The Service, Princeton, New Jersey) October 2003. 42 p.

Full Text at: www.ets.org/research/pic/parsing.pdf

["Before they're even born, poor and minority children are at risk of doing poorly in school.... In one of the most in-depth looks at the achievement gap between poor and minority students and their white and middle-class peers, this report cites 14 factors. These include poor nutrition, family mobility, too much television, and school factors such as inexperienced teachers and unsafe schools that affect student achievement." Education Commission of the States (November 25, 2003) Online.]

[Request #S9889]

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ASSESSMENT

The Nation's Report Card. By the National Center for Education Statistics. (The Center, Washington, DC) December 2003.

["State Gets Low Marks Again; Gains in Math Fail to Redeem Poor Showing on Nation's Report Card: While the state made some noteworthy double-digit gains in math, reading scores were stagnant, and overall California, compared with other states, remained firmly planted at the bottom in the company of Mississippi and the District of Columbia." Alameda Times-Star (November 14, 2003) 1.]

Reading Highlights 2003. 20 p.:
http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/pdf/dst2003/2004459.pdf

Mathematics Highlights 2003. 36 p.:
http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/pdf/main2003/2004451.pdf

[Request #S9890]

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CALIFORNIA

"Paying for Schools: [Series.]" By Deb Kollars. IN: The Sacramento Bee (November 30-December 15) Various Pagings.

["Reporter Deb Kollars peeled back the layers of such little understood funding categories as categoricals, mandates and revenue limits. What she found was a system rife with problems." Includes: "Obstacle Course: Basic School Funding Rife with Inequities;" "Revenue Limits: A Flawed Foundation: Extra Servings;" "Revenue Limits: Total Overhaul Sought in Funding for Schools." In the final segment, on the basic underlying money schools get to educate each child, California has managed to turn a $29 billion responsibility for basic school funding into yet another obstacle course of inequities."]

[Request #S9891]

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HIGHER EDUCATION

Flexible Facility Utilization Standards -- Higher Education. By Paul Guyer, Office of the Legislative Analyst. (The Office, Sacramento, California) November 2003. 10 p.

Full Text at: www.lao.ca.gov/2003/flexible_facility/flexible_facility.html

["Current state standards for utilization of higher education instructional facilities can be simplified and made more flexible. We recommend restating these standards on the basis of 'annual hours of station use per year.' This would both simplify the standards and accommodate year-round operation."]

[Request #S9892]

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Dual Enrollment Programs: Easing Transitions from High School to College. By T. Bailey and others, Community College Research Center. CCRC Brief. No. 17. (The Center, New York, New York) 2003. 4 p.

Full Text at: www.tc.columbia.edu/ccrc/PAPERS/Briefs/brief17.pdf

["An increasing national focus on the need for high academic standards ... has led to the expansion of programs that allow high school students to take college-level classes and earn college credit while still in high school.... A new report outlines what is known about these programs, what we still need to find out, and what practitioner and policymakers seeking to smooth the transition from high school to college for all students can learn from those programs already in existence." Public Education Network Weekly (November 7, 2003) 4.]

[Request #S9893]

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SCHOOL CHOICE

School Choice: Doing It the Right Way Makes a Difference. By Paul Hill, University of Washington. Prepared for the First National Commission on Choice in K-12 Education. (Brookings Institution, Washington, DC) November 17, 2003. 27 p.

Full Text at: www.brookings.edu/dybdocroot/comm/events/20031117.pdf

["Study: School Choice Raises Standards: School choice initiatives, including vouchers and charter schools, can raise education standards if communities provide adequate student funding and effectively regulate the programs, a study said.... 'One of the best ways to ensure that a school performs well is to provide full funding for students, limit state and federal regulation to admissions policies, and leave communities as much flexibility as possible to hire teachers and promote them,' said the report." New York Sun (November 18, 2003) 6.]

[Request #S9894]

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TEACHER DEVELOPMENT

Teaching and California's Future: The Status of the Teaching Profession 2003: Research Findings and Policy Recommendations. By Patrick M. Shields and others. (The Center for the Future of Teaching and Learning, Santa Cruz, California) 2003. 183 p.

Full Text at: www.cftl.org/documents/2003fullreportdec10.pdf

["This report provides the latest available data and analysis of California's teaching workforce and examines the preparation, induction and professional development of teachers. The report also examines the preparation of those assigned to teach special education and English language learning students, and the shortage of qualified teachers in the fields of mathematics and science."]

[Request #S9895]

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EMPLOYMENT

UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE

Unemployment Insurance (UI) is Not a Safety Net for Unemployed Former Welfare Recipients. By Heather Boushey, Center for Economic and Policy Research and Jeffrey B. Wenger, University of Georgia. (The Center, Washington, DC) December 2, 2003. 21 p.

Full Text at: www.cepr.net/Publications/tanf_ui.pdf

["A new study from CEPR finds that workers who have left the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program (TANF) are actually less likely to qualify for unemployment insurance than the people who had left welfare in the years just prior to welfare reform. This finding is striking because a stated goal of welfare reform was to integrate beneficiaries into the mainstream of the labor market."]

[Request #S9897]

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Unemployment Insurance In California. By The California Budget Project. (The Project, Sacramento, California) December 2003. 4 p.

Full Text at: www.cbp.org/2003/031210UI.pdf

["During the second quarter of 2003, employer contributions as a percentage of total wages –- at 0.5 percent – were the lowest in the history of the state’s UI program. In contrast, employer contributions as percentage of total wages were 0.97 percent in 1993, 1.04 percent in 1983, 1.48 percent in 1973, 1.90 percent in 1963, and 0.97 percent in 1953.... During the second quarter of 2003, California’s average weekly benefit replaced only 31.3 percent of the average weekly wage of UI recipients. California ranked 45th among 50 states with respect to this measure of benefit adequacy."]

[Request #S9898]

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Approaching the Deadline: What Type of Unemployment Benefits Extension Should be Adopted, and When? By Isaac Shapiro, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, Washington, DC) November 12, 2003. 4 p.

Full Text at: www.cbpp.org/11-12-03ui.pdf

["Starting January 1, workers who exhaust their regular state benefits will not be eligible for additional federal Temporary Extended Unemployment Compensation (TEUC) benefits. The only people who will continue to receive TEUC benefits will be those already enrolled in the program at the end of this year. This year, an average of 370,000 workers have exhausted their state unemployment insurance benefits each month. In the first half of next year alone, two million or more workers will likely exhaust their regular benefits and, unless TEUC is extended, will go without either a paycheck or an unemployment check."]

[Request #S9903]

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WAGES

Living Wages Laws: Smarter Economic Development, Lower Than Expected Costs. By Andrew J. Elmore, Brennan Center for Justice at New York University School of Law. (The Center, New York, New York) 2003. 23 p.

Full Text at: www.brennancenter.org/programs/living_wage/elmore_report.pdf

["This report details that living wage laws have improved economic development in their communities and have cost much less to implement than most analysts initially expected. This is the first study to interview administrators at a wide range of local governments that have actually implemented a living wage law and have had the time to assess the actual costs to their cities or counties. Major findings for those cities where a living wage law was adopted include: increased contract costs by less than 0.1% of the overall local budget; competitive bidding instituted for contracts; and, increased public support for their economic development programs."]

[Request #S9899]

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ENERGY

ENERGY EFFICIENCY

2003 Integrated Energy Policy Report: Draft Final Commission Report. By the Ad Hoc Integrated Energy Policy Report Committee, California Energy Commission. Docket No. 02-IEP-1. (The Commission, Sacramento, California) October 2003. 48 p.

Full Text at: www.energy.ca.gov/energypolicy/documents/2003-10-30_FINAL_DRAFT.PDF

["California Energy Commission reports that California currently draws on renewable energy for 11% of its electricity and could produce about 10 times more electricity from renewable energy than it does today. The document will be submitted to the California Legislature in support of the state's new Renewable Portfolio Standard, which requires that 20% of the state's retail electricity sales come from renewable energy sources." E-newswire (December 3, 20003) 1.]

[Request #S9900]

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Plant-Wide Assessment Case Studies and Summaries. By the U.S. Department of Energy. (The Department, Washington, DC) 2003. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.oit.doe.gov/bestpractices/case_studies_pwa.shtml

["The department has published a series of case studies showing that plant-wide energy assessments work effectively to improve energy efficiency. The reports document 25 plant-wide assessments that found nearly $107 million in annual energy savings -- an average of $4.27 million in annual savings at each plant. The estimated annual savings ranged from a low of $75,000 at a small chemical plant to a high of $52 million at a large refinery." e-newswire (November 11, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S9901]

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GASOLINE AND DIESEL

2003 California Gasoline Price Study: Final Report. By the Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration, U.S Department of Energy. (The Department, Washington, DC) November 2003. 96 p.

Full Text at: www.eia.doe.gov/pub/oil_gas/petroleum/analysis_publications/caprice/caprice.pdf

["Short Supply, Not Oil Firms, Blamed for High Gas Prices- The sharp rise in gasoline prices that hit California and the rest of the country in August stemmed from short supplies, not market manipulation by the oil companies, according to a federal report. The report said that the run-up had its roots in an oil industry strike in Venezuela and the war in Iraq. Those factors prompted U.S. refineries to draw down oil and gasline inventories to unusually low levels." LATimes.com (December 3, 2003).]

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ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES

FLOODS

Peter Paterno, et al. v. State of California, et al. California Court of Appeal, Third Appellate District. C040553. November 26, 2003. 53 p.

Full Text at: www.courtinfo.ca.gov/opinions/documents/C040553.PDF

["In a ruling that underscores California's vulnerability to costly flood damages, an appeals court has found the state liable for a devastating levee break that flooded hundreds of homes and a shopping center in the Yuba County town of Linda in 1986.... The case is significant because state officials have recently acknowledged they don't have the funds to maintain levees, weirs and other flood control structures that have both saved the Central Valley from floods and, at other times, failed with catastrophic results." Sacramento Bee (November 29, 2003) A1.]

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RECYCLING

Calling All Cell Phones: Collection, Reuse, and Recycling Programs in the U. S. By Eric Most, INFORM. (INFORM Inc., New York, New York) 2003. 21 p.

Full Text at: www.informinc.org/Calling_Cellphones_front.pdf

["This study provides the first in-depth assessment of some of the key collection and reuse programs in this country. While these still new programs mark a step in the right direction, their impact on cell phone waste has so far been neglible. This report identifies the likely reasons for their minimal impact and makes specific recommendations to significantly improve their effectiveness. It also describes how manufacturers and government can help such programs tackle the cell phone waste challenge both at home and abroad."]

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WATER POLLUTION

Evaluation of Potential Health Effects of Eating Fish from Selected Water Bodies in the Northern Sierra Nevada Foothills (Nevada, Placer and Yuba counties): Guidelines for Sport Fish Consumption. By Susan Klasing and Robert Brodberg, Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency. (The Office, Sacramento, California) December 2003. 48 p.

Full Text at: www.oehha.ca.gov/fish/pdf/SierraLakesAdvisoryfinal.pdf

["For the first time, state health officials are warning that fish caught in Sierra Nevada streams are contaminated with mercury left over from the Gold Rush. Sensitive populations -- such as pregnant woman -- and even other healthy adults could exceed a safety guideline for mercury if they eat more than one to eight meals of such fish a month, depending on the species of fish.... Another advisory warns about catfish, carp and crappie from Black Butte Reservoir in Glenn and Tehama counties." San Francisco Chronicle (December 17, 2003) A23.]

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WATER RIGHTS

Water Heist: How Corporations are Cashing in on California’s Water. By John Gibler, Public Citizen. (Public Citizen, Oakland, California) December 2003. 38 p.

Full Text at: www.citizen.org/documents/Water_Heist_lo-res.pdf

["'A water bank designed as a safeguard against drought is being used by Paramount and other mega-farms to grow even bigger,' said John Gibler. 'In some cases, this water is being promised to major developers, such as Newhall Ranch, as a way to get thousands of houses green-lighted by county governments. A public resource has been privatized by and for the wealthiest.'... The water, by dint of legal contracts with the State Water Project, belongs to Paramount and other farming entities that make up five local water districts." Los Angles Times (December 18, 2003) 1.]

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GENERAL GOVERNMENT

CALIFORNIA

"Global California: Greater Legislative Participation in International Affairs." By Robert M. Hertzberg, Former Speaker, California Assembly. IN: Spectrum: The Journal of State Government, vol. 76, no. 4. (Fall 2003) pp. 22-25, 37.

["This article argues that some of the hallmarks of globalization -- new demographics, expanding international market opportunities and competition and the accelerating flow of capital and information -- are doing much more than transforming local California communities. They are changing the day-to-day agenda of the California Legislature toward greater participation in international affairs."]

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COURTS

Securing Equal Justice for All: A Brief History of Civil Legal Assistance in the United States. By Alan W. Houseman and Linda E. Perle, Center for Law and Social Policy. (The Center, Washington, DC) November 2003. 64 p.

Full Text at: www.clasp.org/DMS/Documents/1068130577.17/Legal_Aid_History.pdf

["This document chronicles civil legal assistance for the low-income community in the United States from its privately funded beginnings ... to its expansion and growth into a national program operating throughout the United States. It also describes some of the political battles that have been fought ... and the restrictions that have come with government funding. It concludes with some brief thoughts about the future."]

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ELECTIONS

My Vote Counts: California's Plan for Voting in the 21st Century. By the Office of the California Secretary of State. (The Office, Sacramento, California) 2003. 56 p.

Full Text at: www.ss.ca.gov/elections/HAVA_finalplan_12-03.pdf

["California's plan to comply with the federal Help America Vote Act includes modernizing voting equipment, making polling places accessible to individuals with disabilities, enhancing California's 'provisional ballot' procedures, increasing education of election officials and poll workers, augmenting the information provided to voters, and expanding efforts to inform citizens about the voting process." Secretary of State Press Release (December 16, 2003) 1.]

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EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

Ready or Not? Protecting the Public's Health in the Age of Bioterrorism. By Shelley A. Hearne and others. (The Trust For America's Health, Washington, DC) December 2003. 36 p.

Full Text at: healthyamericans.org/state/bioterror/Bioterror.pdf

["Bioterrorism Preparedness Still Lacking, Health Group Concludes: The report finds that only two states -- Florida and Illinois -- are prepared to distribute and administer vaccines or medicines that would be needed in the event of a major outbreak or attack.... Fewer than a dozen states have written plans for dealing with other public health threats such as pandemic flu ... and remain ill-prepared to distribute and administer vaccines or medicines that would be needed in the event of a major outbreak or attack." Washington Post (December 12, 2003) A2.]

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INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Pay It Forward: Doing the Public's Business with Digital Technologies While Reducing Pressure On the General Fund. By Paul W. Taylor, Center for Digital Government. (The Center, Folsom, California) 2003. 50 p.

Full Text at: media.centerdigitalgov.com/Pay_IT_Forward/pay_IT_lowres.pdf

["This publication documents ... IT-related strategies currently in use by government to make better decisions, increase revenues, reduce expenditures, and open the doors for new opportunities and innovation while reducing pressure on the general fund. The cases and examples profiled here show operational savings of 12 to 30 percent or more."]

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Effective Use of Information Technology: Lessons about State Governance and Processes. By Robert Anderson and others. MR-1704-BSA. (RAND, Santa Monica, California) 2003. 93 p.

Full Text at: www.rand.org/publications/MR/MR1704/

["[This study] is organized around three objectives: obtain an understanding of how California's IT governance worked to coordinate, evaluate, oversee, and exploit as fully as possible the state's investment in IT; determine what lessons can be learned from states with exemplary practices in IT governance; and make recommendations for future directions in California's IT program to support the state's mission in the years ahead."]

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PRIVATIZATION

"Privatization in State Government: Trends and Issues." By Keon S. Chi, Kelley A. Arnold and Healther M. Perkins. IN: Spectrum: The Journal of State Government, vol. 76, no. 4. (Fall 2003) pp. 12-21.

["Privatization continues to be a controversial management issue in state governments. In the past five years, the extent of privatization activities in the states has largely remained the same. In most cases, privatized services account for less than 5% of agency services, while reported savings range from none to less than 5%. This article examines trends and issues being implemented in the states."]

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PUBLIC OPINION

Special Survey of Orange County: PPIC Statewide Survey in Collaboration with the University of California, lrvine. By Mark Baldassare, Public Policy Institute of California. (The Institute, San Francisco, California) December 2003. 27 p.

Full Text at: www.ppic.org/content/pubs/S_1203MBS.pdf

["Growth, Development Top O.C. Concerns.... But a strong economy and quality of life outweigh any complaints, survey finds: Population growth and development top the list of the biggest issues facing Orange County.... People living in Orange County rate their problems lower and their (local) services higher than in any other major metropolitan area." Orange County Register (December 3, 2003) 1.]

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STATE TAXES

"Terminating Tax Shelters: Has California Broken the Legislative Logjam?" By Joseph Bankman and Daniel Simmons. IN: Tax Notes, vol. 101, no. 9. (December 1, 2003) pp. 1111-1115.

["California has enacted some important new reporting requirements and penalties applicable to abusive tax shelters. Among the penalties is a codification of the economic substance doctrine.... The California provisions may provide guidance on crafting enhanced federal penalties."]

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TAXATION

California Commission on Tax Policy in the New Economy: Final Report. By the Commission. (The Commission, Sacramento, California) December 2003. 159 p.

Full Text at: www.library.ca.gov/CaTax/Index.cfm

["This report presents various options for changing California tax policy. For each option, the report provides background information, the type of action required for the proposal to be implemented (such as statutory, regulatory or constitutional amendment), and the effect of the proposed option on the balance of local and state authority. Then an analysis of pros and cons of the option is presented, organized using three categories of guiding principles: Fairness and Perception; Simplicity; Efficiency/Balance."]

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HEALTH

CHILDREN

2003 Physical Fitness Testing: Report to the Governor and the Legislature: By the California Department of Education. (The Department, Sacramento, California) November 2003. 23 p.

Full Text at: www.cde.ca.gov/statetests/pe/govreport2003.pdf

["One Million Kids Fail Fitness Test But States Students Have Raised Scores: The out-of-shape kids represented 75 percent of the 1.3 million students who took an annual fitness test at school last spring and failed to meet six basic fitness categories that included running, lifting and stretching.... About a third of students in each grade were found to have an unhealthy amount of body fat." San Francisco Chronicle (November 15, 2003) A15.]

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HEALTH CARE

Results of a Public Survey of Californians' Concerns about Cuts to Health Care Programs and Services. By the Field Research Corporation. Prepared for the California HealthCare Foundation. (The Foundation, Oakland, California) December 2003. 54 p.

Full Text at: www.chcf.org/documents/policy/FieldPollYearEndFinal.pdf

["In anticipation of funding priority decisions to be made in the Governor's proposed budget in January, CHCF is re-releasing an expanded analysis of a statewide poll.... The survey ... covered such issues as where health care programs rank in public concerns.... Most Californians would be willing to pay higher taxes to maintain current levels of service for emergency room and trauma centers, for health programs for low income and disabled people, and immunizations and prenatal care." CHCF Press Release.]

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HOSPITAL COSTS

New Legislation for HUD Hospital Mortgage Insurance. By Federal Funds Information for States. FFIS Issue Brief. Vol. 03-57 (FFIS, Washington, DC) December 2, 2003. 4 p.

["New legislation creates an alternative mechanism for the Department of Housing and Urban Development to make the statutorily required determination of need for hospitals to access FHA mortgage insurance. The legislation further provides an exemption through July 1, 2006, for 'critical access hospitals' in rural areas.... Both provisions are expected to ease access to the HUD mortgage insurance, thereby increasing its use."]

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MARIJUANA

Raich, et al. v. Ashcroft, et al. U.S. Court of Appeals, Ninth Circuit. 03-15481. December 16, 2003.

Full Text at: www.ca9.uscourts.gov/ca9/newopinions.nsf/F847B86BCD2AB49488256DFE007B89AE/$file/0315481.pdf?openelement

["Medical marijuana advocates scored a potential legal breakthrough when a federal appeals court ruled that two Northern California women could use locally grown pot without risking federal prosecution. The federal ban on marijuana is probably unconstitutional as applied to individuals who obtain the drug without buying it, get it within their state's borders and use it for medical purposes on their doctors' advice and in compliance with state law, said the court -- the first court ever to issue such a ruling." San Francisco Chronicle (December 17, 2003) A1.]

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MEDICARE

Medicare Drug Bill Leads States Out of DSH Valley. By Federal Funds Information for States. FFIS Issue Brief. 03-58. (FFIS, Washington, DC) December 8, 2003. 3 p.

["States lost more than $1 billion in 2003 Medicaid grants as temporary increases in fiscal year (FY) 2001 and FY 2002 disproportionate share hospital (DSH) payments expired .... The new legislation also increases state reporting requirements. Starting in FY 2004, states will be required to file an annual report identifying each hospital that received a DSH adjustment for the preceding year and how much it received... An independent certified audit must be submitted annually."]

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The AARP Ads and the New Medicare Prescription Drug Law. By Edwin Park and Robert Greenstein, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. (The Center, Washington, DC) December 11, 2003. 7 p.

Full Text at: www.cbpp.org/12-11-03health.pdf

["The Medicare legislation increases payments to private managed care plans by more than $14 billion.... Under the legislation, these private plans — principally HMOs — will be reimbursed at rates approximately 25 percent higher than traditional Medicare.... Low-income Medicare beneficiaries eligible for Medicaid will no longer be able to receive drug coverage through Medicaid. Their only alternative will be to enroll in the new Medicare drug benefit, even though as described above, in most cases they will have to pay higher co-payments and may lose access to certain drugs they currently can obtain through Medicaid."]

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SMOKING

State Management and Allocation of Tobacco Settlement Revenue 2003. By Andrew McKinley and others, National Conference of State Legislatures. (NCSL, Denver, Colorado) 2003. 70 p.

Full Text at: www.ncsl.org/programs/press/2003MSA.pdf

["Instead of targeted, tobacco-related health and prevention projects, says the report, states were faced with the dilemma of continuing these special programs at the expense of basic health and education needs of all state citizens.... The report provides data on each state's use of MSA funds, categorized by spending priorities, such as health services, prevention and research." Youth Today (November 2003) 34.]

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HOUSING

AFFORDABLE HOUSING

Rethinking Local Affordable Housing Strategies: Lessons from 70 Years of Policy and Practice. By Bruce Katz and others. (Brookings Institution and Urban Institute, Washington, DC) December 2003. 138 p.

Full Text at: www.brookings.edu/dybdocroot/es/urban/knight/housingreview.pdf

["This report aims to help state and local leaders meet the modern realities of the affordable housing challenge by looking back at the lessons of the past 70 years of housing policies. Based on the findings from the literature review, the report extracts implications for today's state and local affordable housing strategies."]

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HOMEBUYING

Vacating the City: An Analysis of New Homes vs. Household Growth. By Thomas Bier and Charlie Post, Center on Urban and Metropolitan Policy, Brookings Institution. (The Institution, Washington, DC) December 2003. 15 p.

Full Text at: www.brookings.edu/dybdocroot/es/urban/publications/20031205_Bier.pdf

["An analysis of building permits and household changes in 74 of the largest metropolitan areas found that: From 1980 to 2000, the number of new building permits exceeded the number of new households by nearly 19 percent, although there were dramatic differences between decades.... Overall, the relationship between housing construction and household growth is a fundamental and potent factor in the dynamics of urban change."]

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"Southland Sales Surge." IN: DQNews.com: DataQuick Real Estate News. (DataQuick, San Diego, California) December 17, 2003. 1 p.

Full Text at: www.dqnews.com/RRSCA1203.shtm

["Southern California home sales experienced its strongest November in 15 years, the result of robust demand and reasonable mortgage interest rates."]

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HUMAN SERVICES

ELDERLY

Much Ado About Nothing: Debunking the Myth of Frequent and Frivolous Elder Abuse Lawsuits Against California's Nursing Homes. By California Advocates for Nursing Home Reform. (California Advocates for Nursing Home Reform, Sacramento, California) November 2003. 32 p.

Full Text at: www.canhr.org/pdfs/CANHR_Litigation_Report.pdf

["The nursing home industry has wrongly blamed lawsuits by injured patients for its rising insurance costs, a new study by a statewide advocacy group has found.... It found that a small group of nursing homes with citations for poor care were responsible for the bulk of civil lawsuits. A spokesman for the nursing home industry disputed the findings." Sacbee.com (November 21,2003) 1.]

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HOMELESS

Homeless in LA: A Working Paper for the 10-Year Plan to End Homelessness in Los Angeles County. By Patrick Burns and others, The Economic Roundtable. Prepared for Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority. (The Authority, Los Angeles, California) November 2003. 91 p.

Full Text at: www.bringlahome.org/docs/Homeless_in_LA.pdf

["By integrating a series of data sets that provide partial information about the homeless population, [the authors] have produced the following estimates of the number of people who were homeless in the county on a given day in 2002, the duration of their homelessness, and the total annual homeless population."]

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HUNGER

Household Food Security in the United States: 2002. By Mark Nord and others, Food Assistance and Nutrition Research Program, U.S. Department of Agriculture. (The Department, Washington, DC) October 2003. 58 p.

Full Text at: www.ers.usda.gov/publications/fanrr35/fanrr35.pdf

["The prevalence of food insecurity rose from 10.7 percent in 2001 to 11.1 percent in 2002, and the prevalence of food insecurity with hunger rose from 3.3 percent to 3.5 percent. This report provides the most recent statistics on the food security of U.S. households, as well as on how much they spent for food and the extent to which food-insecure households participated in federal and community food assistance programs."]

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Many Families Turn to Food Pantries for Help. By Sheila R. Zedlewski and Sandi Nelson, Urban Institute. Snapshots 3 of America's Families. No. 17. (The Institute, Washington, DC) November 2003. 2 p.

Full Text at: www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/310895_snapshots3_no17.pdf

["Data from the 2002 round of the National Survey of America's Families documents that the working poor are struggling to cover food costs. Over 4 million nonelderly low-income families reported using a food pantry in the past year. Working parents with children made up nearly half the families that turned to food pantries. Forty-six percent of low-income families using food pantries also reported receiving federal food stamps."]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT

YOUTH VIOLENCE

"Relationship Between Bullying and Violence Among U.S. Youth." By Tonja R. Nansel and others. IN: Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, vol. 157, no. 4 (April 2003) pp. 348-353.

["Findings from this study suggest that programs designed to reduce violent behaviors should address less severe forms of aggressive behavior, particularly bullying.... Bullying, as a behavior that is inflicted with the desire to harm another, seems to be an important marker for violence-related behaviors."]

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EDUCATION

CAMPUS DISCIPLINE

"Bullying Among Young Adolescents: The Strong, the Weak and the Troubled." By Jaana Juvonen and others. IN: Pediatrics, vol. 112, no. 6 (December 2003) pp. 1231-1237.

["In this report, the authors sought to use multiple data sources to better understand the psychological and social problems exhibited by bullies, victims, and bully-victims.... Bullies were psychologically strongest and enjoyed high social standing.... In contrast, victims were emotionally distressed and socially marginalized among their classmates."]

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TEACHERS

A Qualified Teacher in Every Classroom: Appraising Old Answers and New Ideas: Seminar Papers. Edited by Frederick M. Hess. (American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research, Washington, DC) October 23-24, 2003. Various pagings.

[Includes: "Cultivating Success Through Multiple Providers: A New State Strategy for Improving the Quality of Teacher Preparation; Assessing Traditional Teacher Preparation: Evidence From a Survey of Graduate and Undergraduate Programs; Improving Academic Performance In U.S. Public Schools: Why Teacher Licensing is (Almost) Irrelevant; Preparing Teachers: Are American Schools of Education Up to the Task; Cultivating Quality In Teaching: A Brief for Professional Standards; Candidate-Centered Model For Teacher Preparation and Licensure; Placing the Preparation and Recruitment of Teachers Into a Labor Market Framework; Back To the Future: The History and Politics of State Teacher Licensure and Certification; and Alternative Licensure:What We Know Now and What We Still Need to Learn."
NOTE: A Qualified Teacher ... will be available for 3-day loan.]
.

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GENERAL GOVERNMENT

COURTS

Restorative Justice: Critical Issues. Edited by Eugene McLaughlin and others, The Open University, United Kingdom. (Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, California) 2003. 224 p.

["This book brings together key international writings that trace the development of restorative justice from its diverse beginnings to current global policies and practices.... It provides a guide to the critical issues facing restorative justice at the beginning of the 21st century." Publisher's Announcement. NOTE: Restorative Justice ... will be available for 3-day loan.]

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HEALTH

CHILDREN

"Association of Race, Socioeconomic Status and Health Insurance with the Prevalence of Overweight in Children and Adolescents." By Jennifer S. Haas and others. IN: American Journal of Public Health, vol. 93, no. 12 (December 2003) pp. 2105-2110.

["A study indicates that African-American and Hispanic children in the United States 6 to 11 years of age are significantly more likely than non-Hispanic white children of the same age to be overweight, while Asian and Pacific Islander children are slightly less likely to be overweight. The researchers found that 43.9 percent of the African-American children were overweight, as were 37.4 percent of Hispanic children. The researchers also found that 21.1 percent of non-Hispanic white children and 19.6 percent of Asian and Pacific Islander children had excess weight." Rocky Mountain News (December 23, 2003) A1.]

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NURSES

Keeping Patients Safe: Transforming the Work Environment of Nurses. By the Institute of Medicine. (National Academies Press, Washington, DC) November 4, 2003. 327 p.

Full Text at: www.nap.edu/books/0309090679/html/

["Nurses' long hours, insufficient training and overload of paperwork often contribute to medical errors that cause preventable deaths and injuries, according to a report.... The report comes amid a nationwide nursing shortage as hospital patients are more acutely ill than before but have shorter hospital stays.... The report offers 18 recommendations for nursing reform." California Healthline (November 10, 2003) 1. NOTE: Keeping Patients Safe ... will be available for 3-day loan.]

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