Subject: Studies in the News 03-46 (July 22, 2003)


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News
Environmental Supplement


Contents This Week

Introductory Material ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES
   Pollution in portable classrooms
   Hydrogen fuel and environment
   Minority opinions on environmental issues
   Three pollutants and climate change
   Energy, health and climate change
   Drinking water security
   Survey of earthquake hazard areas
   Proposed rule for Gnatcatcher
   Shrimp to be studied for protection
   Environmental justice for all
   UC Merced appeal
   Analysis of environmental regulations
   Dioxins in the food supply
   Decline in federal timber sales
   The most threatened national forests
   Role of growth plans in development
   Urban sprawl in California
   State perspectives on invasive species efforts
   Roads promote invasive species
   The environment and transportation
   By-catch of marine mammals
   America's living oceans
   City park system
   Agricultural pesticides and prostate cancer risks
   Radioactive waste at Livermore
   Need for protection from erosion
   Recycling beverage containers
   Fire retardant in bay fish
   EPA data system misses polluters
   Help needed in setting water quality standards
   Water recycling feasibility
PREVIOUSLY IN STUDIES IN THE NEWS
   Studies in the News, April 15, 2003
   Studies in the News, April 25, 2003
   Studies in the News, May 5, 2003
   Studies in the News, May 13, 2003
   Studies in the News, June 3, 2003
   Studies in the News, June 17, 2003
   Studies in the News, July 3, 2003
   Studies in the News, July 16, 2003
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News is a very current compilation of items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau to supplement the public policy debate in California’s Capitol. To help share the latest information with state policymakers, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library’s website. This week's list of current articles in various public policy areas is presented below.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • Items in the State Library collection can be checked out to state officials and staff.

  • Access to all materials listed will be provided by the State Information Reference Center, either by e-mail to cslsirc@library.ca.gov or by calling 654-0261.

The following studies are currently on hand:

ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES

AIR POLLUTION

Report to the California Legislature: Environmental Health Conditions in California's Portable Classrooms, Public Review Draft. By Peggy L. Jenkins, California Air Resources Board, and others. (The Board, Sacramento, California) June 12, 2003. 202 p.

Full Text at: tinyurl.com/glcv

["While both traditional and portable classrooms have problems with indoor air pollution and poor ventilation, portables generated more complaints from teachers and were 10 times more likely to exceed health guidelines on exposure to formaldehyde -- a suspected cancer-causing chemical used frequently in prefabricated bungalows.... Some pollution could be cut by improving air ventilation, fixing water leaks and thoroughly vacuuming.... But in the future, schools should retire old portable classrooms and redesign bungalows." Los Angeles Daily News (June 25, 2003) N4.]

[Request #S8620]

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"Potential Environmental Impact of a Hydrogen Economy on the Stratosphere." By Tracey K. Tromp and others. IN: Science, vol. 20 no. 5626 (June 13, 2003) pp. 1740-1742.

["Scientists reported that widespread use of hydrogen fuel cells to power everything from cars to power plants could indirectly deplete the ozone layer that protects against ultraviolet radiation.... Caltech scientists say that if hydrogen were used as the main energy source, it would leak during production, distribution and storage on a much larger scale. How much leakage might occur is anyone's guess, but the Caltech researchers speculate it could be substantial" San Francisco Chronicle (June 13, 2003. A4.]

[Request #S8628]

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CALIFORNIA

Racial/Ethnic Group Attitudes Towards Environmental Protection in California: Is "Environmentalism" Still a White Phenomenon? By Matthew Whittaker and others. (Midwest Political Science Association, Bloomington, Indiana) 2003. 38 p.

Full Text at: mpsa.indiana.edu/conf2003papers/1031935397.pdf

["Pooling Field Polls in California across a 21-year span, we model support for various pro-environment positions among Latino, African-American, and non-Hispanic white respondents. We find considerable empirical support for this dynamic of growing minority environmental concern among Latinos, but only weak evidence for a similar trend among African-Americans."]

[Request #S8621]

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CLIMATE CHANGE

Climate Change: Information on Three Air Pollutants' Climate Effects and Emissions Trends. By the U.S. General Accounting Office. GAO-03-25. (The Office, Washington, DC) April 2003. 68 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/new.items/d0325.pdf

["GAO was asked to examine (1) the extent of agreement among scientists regarding the effect on the climate of three air pollutants -- black carbon (soot), ground-level ozone, and sulfate aerosols -- and (2) seven countries' efforts to control these pollutants, trends in these substances, and estimates for the next decade."]

[Request #S8632]

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Degrees of Danger: How Smarter Energy Choices Can Protect Our Health in California. By Physicians for Social Responsibility (Physicians for Social Responsibility, Washington, DC) April 2003. 62 p.

Full Text at: www.envirohealthaction.org/upload_files/Degrees_of_Danger_CA.pdf

["This report was prepared by Physicians for Social Responsibility to alert California residents to the potential health effects of climate change and air pollution and how our energy choices and reliance on fossil fuels impact our health... Californians have the ability and the responsibility to take action to protect their health and stop the human-made causes of climate change."]

[Request #S8644]

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DRINKING WATER

Protecting Our Water: Drinking Water Security in America After 9/11. By the American Water Works Association. (The Association, Denver, Colorado) May 1, 2003. 11 p.

Full Text at: tinyurl.com/bj70

["The report identifies the extensive new security measures water utilities have undertaken since 9/11. It also describes the new culture of security that water utilities now operate under and the challenges they still face in protecting the nation's water supplies from terrorism."]

[Request #S8622]

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EARTHQUAKES

Seismic Hazard Zone Reports and Maps. By the Seismic Hazards Mapping Program, California Geological Survey. (The Survey, Sacramento, California) July 2003. Various pagings.

Full Text at: gmw.consrv.ca.gov/shmp/

["The state released the first map of East Bay spots that are most likely to crumble, slump and slide during a major earthquake -- guides geologists said city planners, builders and home buyers should heed.... While most everyone in the Bay Area already knows this is quake country, the maps codify in fine print the highest hazards for landslides and liquefaction. They legally require home builders to pay attention to these maps when constructing homes, and make cities liable to ensure the work gets done right." San Jose Mercury News (July 3, 2003) B1.]

[Request #S8623]

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ENDANGERED SPECIES

Designation of Critical Habitat for the Coastal California Gnatcatcher (Polioptila californica) and Determination of Distinct Vertebrate Population Segment for the California Gnatcatcher (Polioptila californica); Proposed Rule. By the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. IN: Federal Register, vol. 68, no. 79. (April 24, 2003) pp. 20228-20312

["The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said it wants to designate 495,000 acres of Southern California land -- much of it along the region's coastline -- as critical habitat to the coastal California gnatcatcher.... A federal judge last year ordered Fish and Wildlife officials to reconsider their original plans to protect 513,650 acres of land and to reconsider the economic effects of the proposal. This proposal, which includes land in Ventura, Los Angeles, San Diego, Riverside and San Bernardino counties, is the result of that new study." Los Angeles Times (April 25, 2003) B6.]

Proposed Rule. 86 p.
Federal Register

Press release. 2 p.
press release

[Request #S8624]

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Service to Consider Listing Midvalley Fairy Shrimp: Press release. By the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. (The Service, Sacramento, California) April 29, 2003. 1 p.

Full Text at: tinyurl.com/hdoz

["A tiny freshwater shrimp identified as a species three years ago will be studied for potential protection under the Endangered Species Act. The midvalley fairy shrimp lives in vernal pools in the Central Valley's Contra Costa, Fresno, Madera, Merced, Sacramento, San Joaquin and Solano counties.... Adding such protections has been controversial because it presents extra hurdles to developing the fast-growing Central Valley." San Diego Union Tribune (April 30, 2003) A5.]

[Request #S8625]

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ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE

Environmental Justice for All [Issue Theme.] IN: Environment, vol. 45, no. 5. (June 2003) 45 p.

[Includes: "Dispelling Old Myths: African American Concern for the Environment;" "Possible Responses to Global Climate Change: Integrating Mitigation and Adaptation;" "Indicators of Progress;" and others. NOTE: Environment is available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S8626]

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ENVIRONMENTAL LITIGATION

San Joaquin Raptor/Wildlife Rescue Center, et al. v. Regents of the University of California, et al. California Court of Appeal, Fifth Appellate District. F041622. June 24, 2003. Various pagings.

["The University of California at Merced won a battle with environmental groups trying to stop construction by overturning the environmental report on the campus site.... The 5th District Court of Appeal in Fresno ruled that the university's plan shows an adequate source of water for the campus and that it would not hurt the surrounding area." Modesto Bee (June 25, 2003) A1.]

[Request #S8627]

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ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATION

Firm's Choice of Regulatory Instruments to Reduce Pollution: A Transaction Cost Approach. By Magali A. Delmas, University of California, Santa Barbara and Alfred Marcus, University of Minnesota. Prepared for the Institute for Social, Behavioral, and Economic Research, University of California, Santa Barbara. ISBER Publications Paper 4. (The University, Oakland, California) 2003. 43 p.

Full Text at: tinyurl.com/hduw

["This paper extends transaction costs economics to analyze relationships between firms and regulatory agencies. It compares the economic efficiency of firm-agency governance structures for dealing with pollution reduction.... The transaction costs of three ideal type governance structures are analyzed: command and control regulation, market based mechanisms, and negotiated agreements."]

[Request #S8645]

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FOOD SUPPLY

Dioxins and Dioxin-like Compounds in the Food Supply: Strategies to Decrease Exposure. By the Committee on the Implications of Dioxins in the Food Supply, Institute of Medicine. (The Institute, Washington, DC) July 2003. 4 p.

Full Text at: www.iom.edu/includes/DBFile.asp?id=13108

["The U.S. government needs to help its citizens reduce their exposure to dioxins, in part by encouraging healthy eating, an expert panel said. It should limit and test for dioxins in farm animals, feed and crops.... Since their health effects were discovered in the 1970s, dioxin production has plummeted. But they persist in the environment and build up in fatty tissues and fatty products -- meaning they can stay in the body for a lifetime." World Environment News (July 2, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S8629]

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FORESTRY

BLM Public Domain Lands: Volume of Timber Offered for Sale Has Declined Substantially Since Fiscal Year 1990. By the U.S. General Accounting Office. GAO-03-615. (The Office, Washington, DC) June 2003. 27 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/new.items/d03615.pdf

["The amount of timber from federal lands sold to lumber companies fell by 74 percent during the past 12 years as the Interior Department focused on improving forest health instead of timber sales, a government watchdog report said.... A separate agency, the U.S. Agriculture Department's Forest Service, controls 192 million acres of national forests and has seen a similar decline in timber sales, the GAO said.... Green groups said the government was forced to reduce timber sales to comply with federal laws that were ignored until the past decade." Reuters News Service (June 24, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S8630]

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Endangered Forests, Endangered Freedoms: America's 10 Endangered National Forests. By the National Forest Protection Alliance. (The Alliance, Missoula, Montana) June 2003. 40 p.

Full Text at: www.endangeredforests.org/report/10_me_2003_opt.pdf#zoom=100

["Environmentalists identified the Sequoia National Forest as one of the most endangered in the country. The ranking carries no official status and reflects some environmental groups' inherent skepticism about any logging on public lands. The listing also showcases, though, the broader political maneuvering under way over forest management in California and across the country.... The Sequoia forest was cited for 'special mention,' while the Plumas was placed among the Top 10 endangered list." Sacramento Bee (June 4, 2003) A3.]

[Request #S8631]

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GROWTH MANAGEMENT

Smart Growth in Action, Part 2: Case Studies in Housing Capacity and Development from Ventura County, California. By William Fulton, Solimar Research Group, and others. (The Group, Ventura, California) June 2003. 50 p.

Full Text at: www.solimar.org/pdfs/ps311.pdf

["The study concludes that so-called general plans fail to reflect political and market realities and are not reliable predictors of how many homes will probably be built.... As a solution, the new report recommends wide-scale use of so-called specific plans for large developments. That process permits cities, developers and the public to hash out in great detail all elements of a plan, thus creating a true master plan that will be followed, usually within five years, instead of an oblique general plan that is commonly ignored." Los Angeles Times (May 23, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S8633]

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An Economist's Perspective on Urban Sprawl, Part 1: Defining Excessive Urbanization in California and Other Western States. By Robert W. Wassmer. California Senate Office of Research. (The Office, Sacramento, California) July 2001. 45 p.

Full Text at: tinyurl.com/hdt0

["This paper is intended to offer a better understanding of the incidence of urban sprawl in California.... The paper offers an economic way of thinking about urban sprawl, or decentralized growth. It develops a method for quantifying the degree of sprawl in metropolitan areas."]

[Request #S8639]

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INVASIVE SPECIES

Invasive Species: Federal Efforts and State Perspectives on Challenges and National Leadership. By the U.S. General Accounting office. GAO-03-916T. June 17, 2003. 20 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/new.items/d03916t.pdf

["This survey sought state perspectives on (1) perceived gaps in existing legislation and barriers to addressing terrestrial and aquatic invasive species, and (2) the federal leadership structure for addressing invasive species, as well as the integration of federal legislation on terrestrial invasive species with legislation on aquatic invasives."]

[Request #S8636]

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"Roads as Conduits for Exotic Plant Invasions in a Semiarid Landscape." By Jonathan Gelbard and Jayne Belnap. IN: Conservation Biology, vol. 17 no. 2 (April 2003) pp. 420-433.

["While it is well-established that roads can help spread invasive weeds, one new study shows that improved roads are worse than primitive ones, while another suggests that roadless areas act as refuges for native species against invasions.... Roads promote invasion because vehicles can transport nonnative seeds into uninfested areas, and disturbed roadsides give weed seeds a place to grow."]

[Request #S8637]

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LAND USE

Second Nature: Improving Transportation Without Putting Nature Second. By Patricia A. White and Michelle Ernst, Surface Transportation Policy Project (The Project, Washington, DC) 2003. 80 p.

Full Text at: www.transact.org/library/reports_pdfs/Biodiversity/second_nature.pdf

["Mobility does not have to come at the expense of biodiversity. This report profiles innovative programs that seek to improve transportation infrastructure while protecting biodiversity. Because this concept is relatively new, many of the case studies are still in the early stages. While outcomes are uncertain, each exemplifies the creative cooperation necessary to affect change."]

[Request #S8638]

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MARINE MAMMALS

By-Catches Of Marine Mammals In U.S. Fisheries and a First Attempt to Estimate the Magnitude of Global Marine Mammal By-Catch. By Andrew J. Read, Duke University Marine Laboratory, and others. (World Wildlife Fund, Washington, DC) June 13, 2003. 12 p.

Full Text at: www.panda.org/downloads/species/iwc55bycatchpaper.doc

["Nearly 1,000 whales, dolphins and porpoises drown every day after becoming tangled in fishing nets and other equipment, scientists say in what appears to be the first global estimate of the problem.... The new study, conducted by American and Scottish biologists, suggests that accidental captures, known as "bycatch" in the fishing industry, may be the biggest immediate threat to these animals' survival - even more than ship collisions and pollution." Sacramento Bee (June 16, 2003) A8.]

[Request #S8640]

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OCEAN RESOURCES

America's Living Oceans: Charting A Course for Sea Change. By Pew Oceans Commission. (The Commission, Arlington, Virginia) May 2003. 166 p.

Full Text at: www.pewoceans.org/oceans/downloads/oceans_report.pdf

["America's oceans are in crisis and the stakes could not be higher. More than half the U.S. population lives in coastal counties.... More than 180 million people visit the shore for recreation every year.... Now, thousands of jobs and billions of dollars of investment have either been lost or are jeopardized by collapsing fisheries. Pollution and sprawl threaten ocean-related tourism and recreation. Without reform, our daily actions will increasingly jeopardize a valuable natural resource and an invaluable aspect of our national heritage."]

[Request #S8641]

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PARKS & RECREATION

The Excellent City Park System: What Makes It Great and How to Get There. By Peter Harnik, The Trust for Public Land. (The Trust, Washington, DC) 2003. 42 p.

Full Text at: www.tpl.org/content_documents/excellent_city_parks.pdf

["As this booklet shows, there are some solid groundrules to follow in seeking park excellence, and there are marvelous examples of cities that have succeeded. The Trust has been studying the relationship between cities and parks for more than 30 years, and the lessons put forth in this booklet represent the sum total of that knowledge and experience."]

[Request #S8642]

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PESTICIDES

"Use of Agricultural Pesticides and Prostate Cancer Risk in the Agricultural Health Study Cohort." By C.R. Michael and others. IN: American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 157, no. 9 (May 2003) pp. 800-814.

["Farmers who use certain pesticides seem to have a high risk of prostate cancer.... Associations between pesticide use and prostate cancer risk among the farm population have been seen in previous studies; farming is the most consistent occupational risk factor for prostate cancer." World Environment News (May 2, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S8643]

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RADIOACTIVE WASTE

Radioactive Waste: DOE has Acted to Address Delay in New Facility at Livermore Laboratory, but Challenges Remain. By the U.S. General Accounting Office. GAO-03-558. (The Office, Washington, DC) May 2003. 25 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/new.items/d03558.pdf

["Department of Energy environmental officials took a year or longer to resolve 'lingering disagreements' about safety requirements at a Lawrence Livermore Laboratory waste storage facility, according to a report by Congress' investigative agency.... 'The facts here are indisputable,' said Rep. Ellen Tauscher. 'We have a building that costs more than $60 million going unused, with hazardous waste left outside in a post-Sept. 11 environment.'" Contra Costa Times (May 16, 2003) F4.]

[Request #S8646]

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SOIL EROSION

USDA Needs to Better Ensure Protection of Highly Erodible Cropland and Wetlands. By the U.S. General Accounting Office. GAO-03-418. (The Office, Washington, DC) April 2003. 112 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/new.items/d03418.pdf

["USDA's Natural Resource Conservation Service has not consistently implemented the 1985 Food Security Act's conservation provisions. Inconsistent implementation increases the possibility that some farmers receive federal farm payments although their soil erodes at higher rates than allowed or they convert wetlands to cropland."]

[Request #S8619]

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SOLID WASTE

California Beverage Container Recycling and Litter Reduction Study: A Report to the California Legislature. By Peter Berck and George Goldman, University of California, Berkeley. Prepared for the California Department of Conservation. (The Department, Sacramento, California) April 14, 2003. 70 p.

Full Text at: www.consrv.ca.gov/DOR/UC%20Study%2041603.pdf

["The health-conscious Californians who drink bottled water seemingly by the barrel are unwittingly contributing to an avalanche of wasted plastic that is clogging up landfills and contributing to air pollution, according to state officials.... Only 16% of the plastic water bottles are being recycled in California, even though consumers can now turn them in for a cash refund, as they can with glass bottles and aluminum cans." Los Angeles Times (May 28, 2003) B1.]

[Request #S8647]

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WATER QUALITY

Tainted Catch: Toxic Fire Retardants Are Building Up Rapidly in San Francisco Bay Fish -- And People. By Sonya Lunder and Renee Sharp, Environmental Working Group. (The Group, Oakland, California) July 2003. 51 p.

Full Text at: www.ewg.org/reports/taintedcatch/pdf/PBDEs_final.pdf

["Chemical flame retardants in everyday products from computers to seat cushions are showing up in surprising concentrations in the Bay Area, a study reported. More alarming was how rapidly it had accumulated....A bill banning two of the most common types of PBDEs in California is poised to pass the state Legislature....The danger, said Lunder, is that PBDE shows signs it is as persistent a pollutant as another class of toxic chemicals -- PCBs, or polychlorinated biphenyls." Oakland Tribune (July 11, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S8648]

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EPA Should Take Further Steps to Address Funding Shortfalls and Time Slippages in Permit Compliance System Modernization Effort. By the Office of the Inspector General, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (The Office, Washington, DC) May 20, 2003. 13 p.

Full Text at: www.epa.gov/oigearth/ereading_room/20030520_2003-M-00014.pdf

["The computer system used by the EPA to track and control water pollution is obsolete, full of faulty data and does not take into account thousands of significant pollution sources, according to a new government report.... Because of its many problems it will be at least three years before the agency and the states can properly manage the enormous system of permits that is the basic tool for enforcing the Clean Water Act." San Francisco Chronicle (May 27, 2003) A11.]

[Request #S8649]

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Water Quality: EPA Should Improve Guidance and Support to Help States Develop Standards That Better Target Cleanup Efforts. By the U.S General Accounting Office. GAO-03-881T. (The Office, Washington, DC) June 2003. 18 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-03-881T

[“While EPA has developed and published criteria for a wide range of pollutants, the agency has not updated its criteria documents to include sedimentation and other key pollutants that are causing approximately 50 percent of water quality impairments nationwide. In addition to needing new criteria documents, states need assistance from EPA in establishing criteria so that they can be compared with reasonably obtainable monitoring data.”]

[Request #S8650]

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WATER SUPPLY

Draft Urban Water Management Plan, Appendix F: Recycled Water Feasibility Study, Executive Summary. By the City of Redwood City, Public Works Services Department. (The City, Redwood City, California) April 28, 2003. 11.

Full Text at: tinyurl.com/hdwt

["Recycled water used for landscape irrigation is safe, based on what is known scientifically, according to a study commissioned by the city. No illnesses have been documented anywhere in the United States caused by use of recycled water to irrigate urban areas, the report found, and the treatment process can reduce pathogens to levels too low to measure." San Mateo County Times (May 14, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S8651]

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PREVIOUSLY IN STUDIES IN THE NEWS
[This section links to items in Studies in the News since the last Environmental Supplement.]

"Environment and Natural Resources." IN: Studies in the News, 03-23 (April 15, 2003)

Full Text at: www.library.ca.gov/SITN/2003/0323.htm#ENVIRONMENT

[Includes: "Order on dolphin-safe labels."]

[Request #S8652]

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"Environment and Natural Resources." IN: Studies in the News, 03-27 (April 25, 2003)

Full Text at: www.library.ca.gov/SITN/2003/0327.htm#ENVIRONMENT

[Includes: "Regulation of nonroad diesel," "Air particles linked to cell damage," "Financing brownfields cleanup," "Earthquake probabilities in the Bay Area," "Suit to protect rare frog," and "Most endangered rivers."

[Request #S8653]

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"Environment and Natural Resources." IN: Studies in the News, 03-29 (May 5, 2003)

Full Text at: www.library.ca.gov/SITN/2003/0329.htm#ENVIRONMENT

[Includes: "Criticism of power plant rule," "Action plan for San Joaquin air," "Safety regulation of biotech crops," "California's use of world resources," "Updated environmental trend data," "Suit over Quincy logging plans," "Perchlorate in produce," and "Dry year for Klamath river."]

[Request #S8654]

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"Environment and Natural Resources." IN: Studies in the News, 3-31 (May 13, 2003)

Full Text at: www.library.ca.gov/SITN/2003/0331.htm#ENVIRONMENT

[Includes: "Air quality in California," "Economics of climate change," "California Gaviota Coast study," "Designating Santa Barbara coast as national park," "Market sued over farmed salmon," "State role in urban development," "Permit halted for border power plants," "Orange County groundwater depletion," and "Water crises in the West."]

[Request #S8655]

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"Environment and Natural Resources." IN: Studies in the News, 03-35 (June 3, 2003)

Full Text at: www.library.ca.gov/SITN/2003/0335.htm#ENVIRONMENT

[Includes: "Beach report card," "California digital atlas," "Litigation of forest plans," "Contamination at former defense sites," "Pesticide drift," "Department response to pesticide report," and "State of the San Francisco estuary."]

[Request #S8656]

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"Environment and Natural Resources." IN: Studies in the News, 03-39 (June 17, 2003)

Full Text at: www.library.ca.gov/SITN/2003/0339.htm#ENVIRONMENT

[Includes: "Settlement agreement on valley air quality," "Land conservation and water quality issues," "Court upholds MTBE ban," "Climate warming and California water," and "Salton Sea filtering proposal."]

[Request #S8657]

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"Environment and Natural Resources." IN: Studies in the News, 03-42 (July 3, 2003)

Full Text at: www.library.ca.gov/SITN/2003/0342.htm#ENVIRONMENT

[Includes: "Agriculture, science and technology," "Top court resurrects dairy suit," "State air quality implementation plan," "Green building policy for UC," "Field testing GM crops," and "Farmers overplanting Bt corn."]

[Request #S8658]

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"Environment and Natural Resources." IN: Studies in the News, 03-46 (July 15, 2003)

Full Text at: www.library.ca.gov/SITN/2003/0346.htm#ENVIRONMENT

[Includes: "Cleaning up diesel pollution," "Public survey on environmental issues," "EPA report on the environment," "Logging plan for Sierra Nevada," and "Computer recycling efforts."]

[Request #S8659]

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