Subject: Studies in the News 03-35 (June 3, 2003)


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News


California -- One Hundred and Fifty Years Ago

June 1853 - "In June 1853, Governor John Bigler and David C. Broderick, two of the most powerful political brawlers in the state, were fighting the movement to divide the state in half and legalize slavery in the southern part…. Californians aligned with Bigler and Broderick called themselves the Free Soil Democrats, while the pro-slavery faction of the Democratic party called themselves the Chivalry…. The importance of the Bigler-Broderick alliance in keeping California a ‘Free Soil’ state was made clear when the state Democratic Party convention split into two conventions over the question of slavery, each side claiming to be the ‘real’ Democrats. The Free Soil Democrats nominated their own candidates and presented their own platform, as did the Chivalry."  http://www.benicianews.com/articles/index.cfm?artO  

June 1853 - "At the state Democratic Convention in Benicia in June 1853, Broderick asked for backing from the Sacramento delegation, promising to support the move of the capital to Sacramento in return. The Democratic Party nominated Bigler for governor again in 1853. The campaign was bitter and divisive. The Bigler-Broderick machine faced strong opposition from an alliance of the Chivalry and the opposing Whig party. Bigler emerged victorious following a battle in which both sides used the foul tactics that were common in the rough-and-tumble politics of the Old West. "  http://www.benicianews.com/articles/index.cfm?artO  

Contents This Week

Introductory Material CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT
   Youth victimization
   DUI countermeasures
   Protective factors of child delinquency
   Juvenile arrests by race
   Pregnant girls and moms in detention
DEMOGRAPHY
   Gaps between minority children and white children
   Racial identification
ECONOMY
   County position on casino
   Exposure to violent media
   Investigation of brokerage firms
   Venture capital funding
EDUCATION
   Racial gaps in schools
   Paying for schools
   Opinion poll on education
   Reading and federal education policy
   California exit exam
   Lack of writing in schools
ENERGY
   World energy outlook
ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES
   Beach report card
   California digital atlas
   Litigation of forest plans
   Contamination at former defense sites
   Pesticide drift
   Department response to pesticide report
   State of the San Francisco estuary
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
   $10 billion in federal assistance
   California share of federal funds
   Federal funds and budget cuts
   Competitive grant update
   Funds released for homeland security
   Controling lobbyists in California
   May revision of the state budget
   Overview of the May budget revision
   Voting rights of the disabled
   State grants for disabled
HEALTH
   Dietary supplements and youth
   Children's environmental health
   Health insurance inequalities
   SARS death rate higher than expected
   Public health care in response to SARS
   Court upholds drug price law
HUMAN SERVICES
   Group care or foster care
   Transitioning from foster care to independence
   Measuring social programs
   Concentrated poverty in California
   Decrease in concentated poverty
   Welfare reform authorization
TRANSPORTATION
   Designing airports for security
   Reducing congestion
WASHINGTON READER
   California Institute's briefing on federal issues
STUDIES TO COME
   Evaluation of ignition interlock
   Reassessing the marijuana gateway effect
   Commercialization of higher education
   Education for health professions
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News is a very current compilation of items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau to supplement the public policy debate in California’s Capitol. To help share the latest information with state policymakers, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library’s website. This week's list of current articles in various public policy areas is presented below.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • Items in the State Library collection can be checked out to state officials and staff.

  • Access to all materials listed will be provided by the State Information Reference Center, either by e-mail to cslsirc@library.ca.gov or by calling 654-0261.

The following studies are currently on hand:

CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT

CHILDREN & YOUTH

Youth Victimization: Prevalence and Implications. By Dean G. Kilpatrick, National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center. Prepared for the Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. Research in Brief NCJ 194972. (The Department, Washington, DC) April 2003. 19 p.

Full Text at: www.ncjrs.org/pdffiles1/nij/194972.pdf

["Through a nationwide survey of adolescents, researchers examined the prevalence of sexual assault, physical assault, physically abusive punishment, and witnessing an act of violence and subsequent effects on mental health, substance use, and delinquent behavior problems.... Negative outcomes in victims of sexual assault were three to five times the rates observed in nonvictims."]

[Request #S8315]

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DRIVING UNDER THE INFLUENCE

DUI Countermeasures in California: What Works and What Doesn't, With Recommendations for Legislative Reform. By Clifford J. Helander, California Department of Motor Vehicles. Report No. 197. (The Department, Sacramento, California) 2002. 44 p.

["There are four major initiatives which offer the potential for large-scale reductions in alcohol-impaired driving, including new pharmaceutical treatments, increased alcoholic beverage control, reducing the contribution of on-premise drinking to the DUI problem, as well as prevention efforts focused on youth.... Prevention efforts, as opposed to increased punishments, are seen as having a greater potential for future reductions in the incidence of DUI."]

[Request #S8316]

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JUVENILE DELINQUENCY

Risk and Protective Factors of Child Delinquency. By Gail A. Wasserman and others. Prepared for the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, U.S. Department of Justice. IN: Child Delinquency Bulletin (April 2003). p. 1-16.

Full Text at: www.ncjrs.org/pdffiles1/ojjdp/193409.pdf

["This Bulletin focuses on four types of risk and protective factors: individual, family, peer, and school and community.... This series offers the latest information about child delinquency, including analyses of child delinquency statistics, insights into the origins of very young offending, and descriptions of early intervention programs."]

[Request #S8317]

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JUVENILE JUSTICE

Race as a Factor in Juvenile Arrests. By Carl E. Pope and Howard N. Sayder, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, U.S. Department of Justice. (The Office, Washington, DC) April 2003. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.ncjrs.org/pdffiles1/ojjdp/189180.pdf

[“Race-related issues are a major concern in the criminal and juvenile justice systems. This Bulletin focuses on a specific aspect of that concern within the juvenile justice system: the effects of race on police decisions to take juvenile offenders into custody.”]

[Request #S8318]

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WOMEN

Pregnant Girls and Moms in Detention. By Sue Mahan, University of Central Florida. IN: Justice Policy Journal: Analyzing Criminal and Juvenile Justice Issues and Policies, vol. 1, no. 2 (Spring 2003) p. 1-22.

Full Text at: www.cjcj.org/pdf/mahan.pdf

["Beginning at the point of arrest, girls receive different treatment from that accorded boys from law-enforcement and other juvenile justice officials.... Female juveniles are more likely than males to be detained and committed to residential programs for less serious offenses.... Reports of teen pregnancy are significantly higher among girls with a history of childhood maltreatment."]

[Request #S8319]

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DEMOGRAPHY

CHILDREN

Latino Children and African American Children: State-Level Measures of Child Well-Being From the 2000 Census. By the Annie E. Casey Foundation. Kids Count Pocket Guides. (The Foundation, Baltimore, Maryland) 2003.

Full Text at: www.aecf.org/kidscount/latino_pocketguide.pdf

["These two guides provide statistics on economic, educational, and social well-being for minority children and highlight gaps that persist between minority children and non-Hispanic white children in the United States. They use data from the 2000 Census, containing a national overview, state-by-state data and state rankings."] CDF Child Health Information Project (May 23, 2003) 1.]

Latino Children. 17 p.:
http://www.aecf.org/kidscount/latino_pocketguide.pdf

African-American Children. 18 p.:
http://www.aecf.org/kidscount/african_american_pocketguide.pdf

[Request #S8320]

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LATINOS

Latinos and Racial Identification in California. By Sonya Tafoya, Public Policy Institute of California California Counts. Vol. 4, No. 4. (The Institute, San Francisco, California) May 2003. 16 p.

Full Text at: www.ppic.org/content/pubs/CC_503STCC.pdf

["This issue explores how Latinos, in both California and the rest of the nation identify with the standard racial groups ... used by the U.S. Census Bureau.... Results from the 2000 Census indicate that over 5.5 million California residents were categorized as 'some other race' and 99 percent of these respondents were Latinos.... In the long run, these practices and Latino responses to questions about race may lead to changes in the federal racial and ethnic classification system."]

[Request #S8321]

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ECONOMY

GAMBLING

Position Statement: Shingle Springs Casino. By the El Dorado County Board of Supervisors. (The County, Placerville, California) May 2003. 6 p.

Full Text at: www.co.el-dorado.ca.us/bos/PDF/CasinoStatement.pdf

["El Dorado County supervisors have committed to spend at least a half-million dollars in what they say may be a lengthy battle to prevent construction of an Indian casino in the Shingle Springs area.... In a defense of their position against the casino, the supervisors had staff members prepare a position paper released last month saying the casino would have a devastating impact not only on the immediate area, but also on the environment and economy of the entire county." Sacramento Bee (May 16, 2003) B1.]

[Request #S8322]

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MEDIA

"Exposure to Violent Media: The Effects of Songs with Violent Lyrics on Aggressive Thought and Feelings." By Craig A. Anderson. IN: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, vol. 84, no. 5 (May 2003) pp. 960-972.

Full Text at: www.apa.org/journals/psp/press_releases/may_2003/psp845960.pdf

["Songs with violent lyrics increase aggressive thoughts and emotions.... The study contradicts a popular suggestion that music loaded with violent imagery, such as some rap and heavy metal are cathartic in venting aggression.... [Researchers] found that students who listened to songs with violent lyrics were more likely to make aggessive associations in subsequent psychological tests." New Scientist (May 4, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S8323]

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SECURITIES REGULATION

States Receive $388 Million from Wall Street Deal. By Federal Funds Information for States. FFIS Issue Brief, 03-22, (FFIS, Washington, DC) May 16, 2003. 2 p.

["A $1.4 billion settlement between the nation's leading investment firms, state regulators, the Securities and Exchange Commission and others will put $388 million in states' coffers.... The agreement concludes a joint investigation into the undue influence of investment banking interests on securities research at brokerage firms."

[Request #S8324]

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VENTURE CAPITAL

Global and Economic Uncertainty Stalls Venture Capital Investment in Q1 2003: Press Release. By PricewaterhouseCoopers, and others. (PWC, New York, New York) May 2003. And 1st Quarter 2003 Venture Capital Survey Results by State. By State Science & Technology Institute. (The Institute, Westerville, Ohio) May 2003.

["The Bay Area's market to finance fledgling companies plummeted to fresh lows during the first three months of 2003. The grim trends emerge from data supplied by the authors of the MoneyTree Survey.... Based on the funding trends nationwide, analysts estimated venture financing for a quarter hasn't been this low since 1997.... Some analysts, though, believe the difficulties in the Bay Area and East Bay venture sectors are more of a return to normal levels of financing activities, rather than a warning of a collapse of the venture arena." Contra Costa Times (May 11, 2003) F4.]

Press Release. 4 p.
http://www.pwcmoneytree.com/moneytree/pdfs/03_Q1_Survey_Highlights.pdf

Survey Results by State. 1 p.
http://www.ssti.org/Digest/Tables/051603t.htm

[Request #S8325]

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EDUCATION

DISCRIMINATION

Education Watch: Key Education Facts and Figures; Achievement, Attainment and Opportunity from Elementary School through College. By the Education Trust. (The Trust, Washington, DC) Winter 2002-2003.

["Nearly a half-century after a landmark U.S. Supreme Court ruling struck down racially segregated schools, African-American and Hispanic students still have less academic opportunity and success than do their white peers." Education Week (May 21, 2003) online.]

The Nation. 14 p.:
http://www.edtrust.org/main/documents/summaries2003/US_statesum.qxd.pdf

Sources & Definitions. 6 p.:
http://www.edtrust.org/main/documents/summaries2003/Statereportstechnicalappend.pdf

Achievement Gap Summary Tables. 19 p.:
http://www.edtrust.org/main/documents/summaries2003/sstables.PDF

Links to State Summary Reports. Various Pagings.:
http://www.edtrust.org/main/main/states.html

California. 10 p.:
http://www.edtrust.org/main/documents/summaries2003/CA_statesum.qxd.pdf

[Request #S8327]

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EDUCATION FINANCE

"Paying for Schools [Series]" By Deb Kollars. IN: Sacramento Bee (February 2, 2003 - May 18, 2003) p. A1+.

[Includes: "Obscure System Costs Millions, Rankles Many"; "State Legislators Target School Programs Maze;" "Education Funding System Faces Audit;" "Drastic School-Program Funding Overhaul Urged;" "Dropout Program Reaches Few Pupils after 18 Years;" "A $4 Million Tale of Forgiveness;" "Prize Program Leaves Many Out in the Cold;" "Counseling for Sophomores -- A Program Adrift;" and "Minding the Store."]

[Request #S7310]

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PUBLIC SCHOOLS

2002 Opinion Poll on Education. By David A. Bositis, Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies. (The Center, Washington, DC) May 2003. 17 p.

Full Text at: www.jointcenter.org/whatsnew/2002-education-poll.pdf

["This poll found that both whites and blacks were more positive about their local schools than they were in 2000 ... but the satisfaction gap—while narrower than in some recent years' polling by the center—was still wide. A little more than a third of the black respondents rated their schools 'excellent' or 'good,' compared with just over half of whites. Hispanics, polled in numbers equal to the black and general-population samples in the center's survey for the first time, fell between the two: Four in 10 rated their schools good or excellent." Education Week (May 21, 2003) online.]

[Request #S8329]

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READING

"Teaching Children to Read: The Fragile Link Between Science and Federal Education Policy." By Gregory Camilli and others. IN: National Institute for Early Education Research and Rutgers University. Education Policy Analysis Archives, vol. 11, no. 15 (May 8, 2003) [online].

Full Text at: epaa.asu.edu/epaa/v11n15/

["This report, which was conducted by the National Reading Panel (NRP), has played an important role in subsequent federal policy regarding reading instruction. Using meta-analysis, the NRP found that systematic phonics instruction was more effective than alternatives in teaching children to read (TCR). In the present study, the findings and procedures leading to TCR were examined. We concluded that the methodology and procedures in TCR were not adequate for synthesizing the research literature on phonics instruction. These findings indicate that phonics, as one aspect of the complex reading process, should not be over-emphasized."]

[Request #S8330]

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STANDARDIZED TESTING

First Things First: Why We Must Stop Punishing Students and Fix California’s Schools: A Report on School Inequality and the Impact of the California High School Exit Exam. By the Californians for Justice Education Fund. (The Fund, Oakland, California) May 17, 2003. 70 p.

Full Text at: www.caljustice.org/pdf/first_things_first.pdf

["This comprehensive report on school inequality and the impact of the California High School Exit Exam highlights the inadequacies and inequalities in schools that serve students of color, low-income students, and English Learners.... The report concludes that the California High School Exit Exam fails its own goals and guidelines, violates civil rights law and standard assessment principles, and unfairly punishes students for the failures of the state."]

[Request #S8326]

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STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT

The Neglected "R": The Need for a Writing Revolution: Report. By the National Commission on Writing in America's Schools and Colleges, (College Entrance Examining Board, New York, NY) April 2003. 44 p.

Full Text at: www.collegeboard.com/prod_downloads/writingcom/neglectedr.pdf

["Writing Revolution Needed, Commission Finds: That's because writing has been neglected in school reform, according to a report.... So, students finish high school without the abiity to write in a sophisticated, precise or engaging fashion, the commission says.... The group calls for writing to be assigned in all classes." San Jose Mercury News (April 25, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S8331]

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ENERGY

ENERGY

International Energy Outlook: 2003. By the Energy Information Administration, U.S. Department of Energy. (The Administration, Washington, DC.) May 2003

["Oil's share of world energy use will only drop slightly from the current 39 percent to 38 percent by 2025, although many countries will switch from oil to natural gas and other fuels to run their electric generating plants.... Developing countries use about 64 percent as much oil as the industrialized nations, and by 2025 their consumption will increase so that it will be 86 percent, EIA said.... Renewable energy sources are not expected to be economically competitive with fossil fuels in the mid-term without significant support from government policies that would encourage their widespread expansion." World Environment News (May 5, 2003) 1.]

Report. 272 p.
ftp://ftp.eia.doe.gov/pub/pdf/international/0484(2003).pdf

Highlights. 6 p.
http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/pdf/highlights.pdf

[Request #S8332]

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ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES

BEACHES

Heal the Bay's 13th Annual Beach Report Card. By Heal the Bay. (Heal the Bay, Santa Monica, California) 2003. Various pagings

Full Text at: www.healthebay.org/brc/annual/2003/default.asp

["Water quality during wet- weather months was far worse in Orange County than it was last year, with 85 "F" grades - an 81 percent increase.... During the year ending in March, Orange County beaches were mostly clean during the dry months, with 79 percent receiving good to excellent ratings. About $4 million in state Clean Beach Initiative funds are being used in Orange County." Orange County Register (May 22, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S8333]

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CALIFORNIA

California Digital Conservation Atlas. By the California Legacy Project. (California Resources Agency, Sacramento, California) April 2003. Various pagings.

Full Text at: legacy.ca.gov/new_atlas.epl?page=atlasWelcome#creator

["The most comprehensive mapping of California's natural resources is now available to the average person -- for free -- online. The California Digital Conservation Atlas -- a kind of Mapquest for natural resources -- combines maps of urban growth projections, polluted rivers, toxic sites, floodplains, land trusts, fish consumption warnings and conservation plans." Sacramento Bee (May 19, 2003) A3.]

[Request #S8334]

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ENVIRONMENTAL LITIGATION

Forest Service: Information on Decisions Involving Fuels Reduction Activities. By the U.S. General Accounting Office. GAO-03-689R. (The Office, Washigton, DC) May 14, 2003. 43 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/new.items/d03689r.pdf

["Few forest thinning projects have been stalled by citizen appeals, a new government report has found, undermining the main argument on behalf of President Bush's 'Healthy Forests' plan just days before the House of Representatives is scheduled to vote on it.... the Forest Service was able to proceed on 95 percent of its wildfire protection projects within 90 days or less.... The report found that more than three-quarters of the 762 wildfire protection projects proposed by the Forest Service during the past two years were never challenged by administrative appeals. Only 3 percent of the projects were litigated." San Francisco Chronicle (May 15, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S8335]

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FEDERAL FACILITIES

Environmental Contamination: DOD Has Taken Steps to Improve Cleanup Coordination at Former Defense Sites, but Clearer Guidance Is Needed to Ensure Consistency. By the U. S. General Accounting Office. GAO-03-146. (The Office, Washington, DC) March 2003. 46 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/new.items/d03146.pdf

["DOD: Better Guidance Needed for Former Site Cleanup Programs: Coordination between the Defense Department and environmental regulators over cleanup of contaminated military facilities has improved in recent years, but clearer guidelines could further improve the situation, according to a report." Greenwire (April 29, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S8336]

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PESTICIDES

Secondhand Pesticides: Airborne Pesticide Drift in California. By Susan Kegley, Pesticide Action Network North America, and others. (The Network, San Francisco, California) May 2003. 79 p.; Appendices.

Full Text at: www.panna.org/resources/documents/SecondhandPs.pdf

["Herbicide Drift Called A Danger: The rice chemical molinate may pose health risks in Valley cities: The report alleges that hundreds of thousands of Californians potentially face health risks from airborne farm chemicals because regulators poorly monitor and control drift." Sacramento Bee (May 8, 2003) D1.]

[Request #S8337]

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Statement of the California Department of Pesticide Regulation in Response to a Pesticide Drift Report by Californians for Pesticide Reform. By the California Department of Pesticide Regulation. (The Department, Sacramento, California) May 6, 2003. 4 p.

["California is the first and only state in the nation to establish a specific ongoing program to evaluate pesticides in air.... DPR strongly disagrees with some statements in the CPR report. ... DPR has taken action -- in some cases years ago -- that address recommendations made in the CPR report."]

[Request #S8338]

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SAN FRANCISCO BAY

Pulse of the Estuary: Monitoring and Managing Contamination in the San Francisco Estuary. By the San Francisco Estuary Institute. (The Institute, Oakland, California) May 2003. 44 p.

Full Text at: www.sfei.org/rmp/pulse/private-pre-release/pulse2003.pdf

["After 10 years of monitoring the bay, an Oakland research institute has found that sewage treatment has improved and there's enough oxygen in the bay for fish.... At the same time, the study identified a new threat to the bay from a class of pesticides that have replaced some of the banned products.... The great influx of exotic species to the bay -- more than 230 -- is as serious a disruption as chemical pollution, the study said." San Francisco Chronicle (May 13, 2003) A14.]

[Request #S8339]

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GENERAL GOVERNMENT

BUDGETING

Senate Passes State Fiscal Relief. By Federal Funds Information for States. FFIS Issue Brief 03-23. (FFIS, Washington, DC) May 16, 2003. 2 p.

["The Senate adopted an amendment to its budget reconciliation bill (S.1054) that would provide $20 billion in fiscal relief to state and local governments.... This Issue Brief summarizes the Senate provision and estimates state-by-state fiscal relief allocations."]

[Request #S8340]

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FEDERAL / STATE RELATIONS

Federal Funds: California's Share of Grant Funding Is Close to Its Share of the Population, but State Spending Cuts May Result in Reduced Federal Funds. By the California State Auditor. (Bureau, Sacramento, California) May 2003. 41 p.

Full Text at: www.bsa.ca.gov/bsa/pdfs/2002-123.1.pdf

["A new report finds California's share of federal grant funding remained just under the state's share of population in federal fiscal year 2001.... The report also projects a possible loss of nearly $4 billion in federal funds largely due to proposed budget cuts in state matching funds outlined in the 2003-2004 Governor's budget." California Institute Capitol Hill Bulletin (May 23, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S8343]

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FEDERAL DEBT

Defense and Entitlements Squeeze Other Federal Spending. By Federal Funds Information for States. FFIS Issue Brief. 03-20. (FFIS, Washington, DC) April 29, 2003. 4 p.

["Data from the federal Monthly Treasury Statement indicate a federal government deficit of $253 billion for the first six months of fiscal year 2003, almost double the level for the first half of FY2002.... Defense, entitlement and homeland security spending dominated growth, while Medicaid growth decelerated substantially and highway spending declined."]

[Request #S8345]

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FEDERAL GRANTS

Competitive Grant Update. By Federal Funds Information for States. FFIS Competitive Grant 03-06. (FFIS, Washington. DC) May 15, 2003. 12 p.

[Includes information on: "Teacher Quality Enhancement Grants Program;" "Disability Rehabilitation Research Projects Program;" "Advanced Placement Incentive Program;" "Climate and Global Change Program;" "Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program;" "Alzheimers Disease Demonstration Grants to States;" and others.]

[Request #S8346]

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Urban Areas Receive $700 Million For Homeland Security. FFIS Issue Brief. 03-21. (FFIS, Washington, DC) May 16, 2003. 2 p.

["The Department has released allocations for $700 million in grants from the supplemental FY 2003 appropriations ... divided into five categories: Formula grants ... grants for port security ... mass transit systems. The remaining funds go to two radiological defense systems, pilot projects and technical assistance."]

[Request #S8347]

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LOBBYING & LOBBYISTS

Hired Guns: Lobbyists Spend Loads Of Money To Influence Legislators—And In Many States, With Too Little Scrutiny. By Robert Morlino and Leah Rush. The Center For Public Integrity. (The Center, Washington, DC) May 2003. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.publicintegrity.org/dtaweb/index.asp?L1=20&L2=10&L3=23&L4=0&L5=0&Print=Yes

["Political lobbyists spent far more in California than in any other state in 2002, yet the Golden State still ranks high in lobbying disclosure and regulation.... California ranked seventh ... falling into the 'relatively satisfactory' range for barring lobbyists from giving gifts to legislators, and requiring both monthly spending reports and listings of bill numbers addressed by lobbyists." Oakland Tribune (May 15, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S8348]

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STATE BUDGET

Governor's Budget, 2003-04: May Revision. By the Department of Finance, (The Department, Sacramento, California) May 14, 2002. 100 p.

Full Text at: www.dof.ca.gov/HTML/BUD_DOCS/May_Revision_2003_www.pdf

["Governor Gray Davis offered a revised plan for coping with a state budget deficit that now tops $38 billion, saying he sought to accommodate all sides to get a spending plan on time and avoid an even greater fiscal calamity.... The plan Davis outlined bears little resemblance to his January proposal. Gone is a $8.3 billion shift of responsibilities to local governments, to be funded by an array of tax increases." Sacramento Bee (May 15, 2003) A1.]

[Request #S8292]

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Overview of the 2003-04 May Revision. By Elizabeth Hill. Legislative Analyst's Office. (LAO, Sacramento, CA) May 19, 2003. 16 p.

Full Text at: www.lao.ca.gov/2003/may_revision/051903_mayrevision.pdf

["[The] revised budget plan balances 'precariously' on a delicate mix of tax increases and borrowing that needs to be supported by more spending cuts, the Legislature's budget analyst said. Noting that half of the governor's plan for closing a record budget deficit would come from borrowing, Legislative Analyst Elizabeth Hill said Monday that carrying so much debt would limit the future options and flexibility of lawmakers." Associated Press (May 20, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S8342]

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VOTERS & VOTING

"Election Reform, Polling Place Accessibility, and the Voting Rights of the Disabled." By Hollister Bundy. IN: Election Law Journal, vol. 2, no. 2 (2003) pp. 217-240.

["This article examines the issue of polling place accessibility for voters with disabilities under prior and current law. [It] evaluates the current status of accessibility and specific barriers to access ... surveys the relevant laws and litigation ... [and] the relevant provisions and expected effect of the Help America Vote Act."]

[Request #S8341]

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HHS Allocates Funding for Disabled Voter Access. By Federal Funds Information for States. FFIS Issue Brief. 03-25. (FFIS, Washington, DC) May 22, 2003. 2 p.

["The Department of Health and Human Services published a notice in the Federal Register containing allotments for $13 million in state grants for Election Assistance for Individuals with Disabilities The grants were authorized at $50 million as part of the 2002 Help America Vote Act."]

[Request #S8344]

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HEALTH

ADOLESCENTS

Teen Herbicide: Dietary Supplements Can Be Deadly. So Why Are They Being Marketed to Kids? By Chris Mooney. IN: Mother Jones (May/June 2003) Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.motherjones.com/news/outfront/2003/19/ma_378_01.html

["Just because they're 'natural' doesn't mean dietary supplements are safe for kids and teens. Mother Jones magazine looks at how kids are becoming a new market in the wake of the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA), which deregulated vitamins, herbal remedies and sports performance boosters and opened the door for their aggressive marketing before they are proven safe or effective." Connect for Kids (May 5, 2003).]

[Request #S8349]

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CHILDREN

Are Children Left Behind? Children's Environmental Health Under the Bush Administration. By the Children's Environmental Health Network. Presented at the National Press Club. (The Network, Washington, DC) May 8, 2003. 42 p.

Full Text at: www.cehn.org/cehn/Bushreport2.html

["This report reviews how well the Administration has adhered to campaign commitments to protect children from environmental toxicants." National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health and Georgetown University's MCH Alert (May 23, 2003).]

[Request #S8350]

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HEALTH INSURANCE

California's New Assembly and Senate Districts: Geographic Disparities in Health Insurance Coverage. By Carolyn A. Mendez, UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, and others. (The Center, Los Angeles) May 2003. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.healthpolicy.ucla.edu/pubs/files/UCLA_LegisDistr_PB_FINAL2.pdf

["This policy brief highlights the geographic disparities in uninsurance among the new California Assembly and Senate districts that were redrawn based on the 2000 Census. Legislative districts with the highest uninsured rates for nonelderly persons are found predominantly in the Central Valley and in Southern California, whereas the districts with the lowest rates are in the greater San Francisco Bay Area and in Sacramento, Alpine, El Dorado and Placer counties."]

[Request #S8351]

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INFECTIOUS DISEASE

“Clinical Progression and Viral Load in a Community Outbreak of Coronavirus-Associated SARS Pneumonia: A Prospective Study.” By J. S. M. Peiris. IN: Lancet, vol. 361, no. 9369 (May 10, 2003) pp. 1-6.

[“The death rate from SARS is substantially higher than many experts had previously believed, reaching 13.2 percent among young and middle-aged people and as high as 55 percent among those over 60, according to the first major study of patients.” Sacramento Bee (May 7, 2003) A1.]

[Request #S8352]

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SARS Outbreak: Improvements to Public Health Capacity Are Needed for Responding to Bioterrorism and Emerging Infectious Diseases. By the U.S. General Accounting Office. GAO-03-769T. (The Office, Washington, DC) May 2003. 24 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/new.items/d03769t.pdf

[“The efforts of public health agencies and health care organizations to increase their preparedness for major public health threats such as bioterrorism and worldwide influenza outbreaks known as pandemics have improved the nation’s capacity to respond to SARS and other emerging infectious disease outbreaks, but gaps in preparedness remain…. GAO found that most hospitals lack the capacity to respond to large-scale infectious disease outbreaks."]

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PRESCRIPTION DRUGS

Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America v. Walsh, et al. Supreme Court of the United States. 01-188. May 19, 2003. 53 p.

Full Text at: www.supremecourtus.gov/opinions/02pdf/01-188.pdf

["The U.S. Supreme Court gave a boost Monday to the campaign to give uninsured Americans low-cost prescription drugs, reviving a novel Maine law that forces drug makers to discount their prices for all consumers if they want to sell to the huge Medicaid program that serves the poor....The decision, while not the final word, clears the way for other states to pass similar drug discount laws. At least 27 states, including California, have considered similar measures in recent years, but only two — Hawaii and Illinois —have passed them." Los Angeles Times (May 20, 2003) A1.]

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HUMAN SERVICES

FOSTER CARE

Institutions vs. Foster Care: The Empirical Base for a Century of Action. By Richard P. Barth, Jordan Institute for Families, University of North Carolina. (The Institute, Chapel Hill, North Carolina) 2002. 40 p.

Full Text at: ssw.unc.edu/jif/publications/reports/GroupCare.pdf

["The author concludes that policymakers and practitioners should emphasize the development of alternative forms of care, such as foster care and therapeutic foster care (rather than residential treatment centers), and receiving centers (rather than centralized emergency shelters.) The author did find group care may work as a temporary placement for specific groups of youth, such as youth who have run away from foster care, those who are destructive or self-destructive, or youth 'stepping down' from a more restrictive form of care to a family-based setting." Children's Bureau Express (May 2003).]

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Public Opinion About Youth Transitioning From Foster Care to Adulthood. By Lake Snell Perry and Associates. (The Associates, Washington, DC) May 2003. 5 p.

Full Text at: www.jimcaseyyouth.org/docs/poll1.pdf

["The public has little awareness about the challenges facing young people transitioning from foster care to independence at age 18, but there is a significant level of concern and broad public support for transitional assistance, according to this study." Connect for Kids (May 19, 2003).]

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NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

Key Steps in Outcome Management. Edited by Harry Hatry and Linda Lampkin, The Urban Institute. Series on Outcome Management for Nonprofit Organizations. (The Institute, Washington, DC) 2003. 43 p.

Full Text at: www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/310776_KeySteps.pdf

["It is no longer enough to tell people what you do in your program; you need to be able to document how well it works to sustain funding and other support. This guide describes the key steps in an outcome-oriented measurement process, including effectively using the data you collect." Connect for Kids (May 19, 2003).]

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POVERTY

Stunning Progress, Hidden Problems: The Dramatic Decline of Concentrated Poverty in the 1990s. By Paul A. Jargowsky. The Brookings Institute. (The Institute, Washington, DC) 2003. 24 p.

Full Text at: www.brook.edu/dybdocroot/es/urban/speeches/20030519_jargowsky.ppt

["California's increased concentration of poverty -- bucking a national trend during the 1990s -- partly reflects the state's growing population of Latin American immigrants. 'Because such a large share of our state population is made up of immigrants, and because there were such strong flows of immigrants in the 1990s, and because immigrants tend to settle in low-income neighborhoods, it's not surprising.'" San Francisco Chronicle (May 16, 2003) 1.]

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Concentrated Poverty: A Change in Course. By G. Thomas Kingsley and Kathryn L. S. Pettit, Urban Institute. Neighborhood Change in Urban America Series. (The Institute, Washington, DC) May 2003. 14 p.

Full Text at: www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/310790_NCUA2.pdf

["According to this study, poverty became notably less concentrated in the 1990s, after decades of moving in the other direction. The share of the metropolitan poor who live in high-poverty neighborhoods (poverty rates of 30 percent or more) increased from 25 to 31 percent in the 1980s but dropped back to 26 percent by 2000."]

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WELFARE REFORM

Achieving Compromise on Welfare Reform Reauthorization. By Ron Haskins, The Brookings Institution and Paul Offner, The Urban Institute (The Institution, Washington, DC) May 6, 2003. 12 p.

Full Text at: www.brookings.edu/dybdocroot/es/wrb/publications/pb/pb25.pdf

["The primary programs that must be reauthorized are the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families block grant and the Child Care and Development Block Grant, both of which place primary responsibility for effective and efficient operation on states.... The federal government should continue to give states broad flexibility in implementing them."]

[Request #S8361]

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TRANSPORTATION

AIRPORTS

Designing Airports for Security: An Analysis of Proposed Changes at LAX. By Terry L. Schell and others. RAND. (RAND, Santa Monica, California) 2003. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.rand.org/publications/IP/IP251/IP251.pdf

["The report raises the question of whether airports can be redesigned to deter a terrorist attack or to minimize casualties if one occurs. Though many of today's facilities incorporate shatterproof glass and steel-reinforced concrete to lessen damage and casualties in a blast, none of the nation's airports has been redesigned after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks." Los Angles Times (May 15, 2003.) 1.]

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COMMUTERS & COMMUTING

Reducing Congestion: Pricing Has Promise for Improving Use of Transportation Infrastructure. By the U. S. General Accounting Office. GAO-03-735T. (The Office, Washington, DC) May 2003. 20 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-03-735T

[“Congestion pricing can potentially reduce congestion by providing incentives for drivers to shift trips to off-peak periods, use less congested routes, or use alternative modes, thereby spreading our demand for available transportation infrastructure.... Possible challenges to implementing congestion pricing include current statutory restrictions limiting the use of congestion pricing, and concerns about equity and fairness across income groups. In theory, equity and fairness concerns could be mitigated depending on how the revenues that are generated are used.”]

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WASHINGTON READER

California Capitol Hill Bulletin. By the California Institute For Federal Policy Research. Vol. 10, Bulletin 14-15. (The Institute, Washington, DC) May 15-23, 2003. 10 p.

Full Text at: www.calinst.org/bulletins/b1015.htm

[Includes: "Administration's Highway and Transit Bill Unveiled;" "Finance Subcommittee Considers Free Trade Area of the Americas" "California Still Smoggiest State According to Report;" "State Aid Included in $350 Billion Tax Package; California Share May Reach $2.2 Billion;" and others.]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT

DRIVING UNDER THE INFLUENCE

An Evaluation of the Implementation of Ignition Interlock in California. By David J. DeYoung, California Department of Motor Vehicles. Report No. 195. (The Department, Sacramento, California) 2003. 94 p.

["California law requires judges to sentence offenders convicted of driving on a DUI-suspended driver license to install an ignition interlock device (IID) on any vehicle they own or operate.... This report presents the results of a process study of the the degree to which California's IID laws have been implemented."]

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DRUG USE

"Reassessing the Marijuana Gateway Effect." By Andrew Morral and others. Rand Public Safety and Justice IN: Addiction, vol. 97 (2002) pp. 1493-1504.

["Using Marijuana May Not Raise the Risk of Using Harder Drugs: A recent analysis suggests that data typically used to support a marijuana gateway effect can be explained as well by a different theory. The new research has implications for U.S. marijuana policy. However, decisions about relaxing U.S. marijuana laws must necessarily take into account many other factors in addition to whether or not marijuana is a gateway drug." Rand Research Brief (2002) 1.]

[Request #S8023]

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EDUCATION

HIGHER EDUCATION

Universities in the Marketplace: The Commercialization of Higher Education. By Derek Bok, Princeton University Press (Princeton, New Jersey) 2003. 256 p.

["What might Harvard do for money if necessary? Put Nike logos on sports uniforms or the gym? Hold back a scientific discovery until it could be patented or produced? Offer credentials over the Internet? Derek Bok, a former president of Harvard begins his new book with this nightmare of university avarice and moral decay." International Herald Tribune (May 22, 2003) 18.]

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MEDICAL EDUCATION

Health Professions Education: A Bridge to Quality. By Ann C. Greiner and Elisa Knebel, Committee on the Health Professions Education Summit. Prepared for the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies (The Academies, Washington, DC) 2003.

["Changes are needed in the education of doctors, nurses, and other health professionals to improve patient safety and qualtiy of care.... The report said 'five core competencies' should be adopted for programs that train health professionals: the abilities to deliver patient-centered care, to work as a member of an interdisciplinary team, to engage in evidence-based practice, to apply quality improvement approaches, and to use information technology." Health Care Policy Report vol. 11, no. 15 (April 14, 2003) p. 514.]

[Request #S8366]

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