Subject: Studies in the News 03-27 (April 25, 2003)


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News


California -- One Hundred and Fifty Years Ago

1853 - "In 1853 a mammoth project was proposed to raise the city (of Sacramento) above the flood level.... In 1850 the city experienced its first devastating flood and again in 1852, the city was wiped out by high water.... The daring scheme to raise the street level 12 feet can be seen throughout Old Sacramento under the boardwalks and in its basements. "  www.oldsacramento.com/brochure.pdf  

1853 - "In 1853 the Williamson railroad survey crew visited a rancheria in Tehachapi Valley whose inhabitants spoke Kawaiisu. This would probably have been the settlement visited by Father Garces in 1776.... A second rancheria some three miles to the east was also reported in Tehachapi Valley in 1853. This may have been the historic village located near the modern site of the cement plant at Monolith. Just to the east were two rancherias, Maa aputs and Nettle Springs, in the Sand Canyon area. Near the latter was an important sacred site, Tomo kahni. "  http://fp3.antelecom.net/vredenb/history/garces.ht  

Contents This Week

Introductory Material CALIFORNIA READER
   California public policy bibliography
CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT
   California's criminal justice build-up
   Drug policy futures
   Crime and victim statistics
DEMOGRAPHY
   Adjusted population estimates
ECONOMY
   Profile of western states' economy
   Inconsistent monetary policies
   Shifting internet population
   Globalization in the San Francisco Bay Area
EDUCATION
   Cost of federal education law
   Indian Education Act in New Mexico
   More minority admissions at UC
   Small percentage of 12th graders at proficient level
   Characteristics of doctoral scientists and engineers
EMPLOYMENT
   Binding arbitration law struck down
   Retirement income data
ENERGY
   Renewable energy opportunities
   Increasing use of renewable energy
ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES
   Regulation of nonroad diesel
   Air particles linked to cell damage
   Financing brownfields cleanup
   Earthquake probabilities in the Bay Area
   Suit to protect rare frog
   Most endangered rivers
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
   Pork barrel spending
   Audit report on Los Alamos Lab
   Drug court monitoring
   DHS releases grant allocations
   Bioterrorism preparedness
   State spending of homeland security funds
   Workforce Investment Act
   Competitive federal grants
   Indian office elevated to New Mexico cabinet
HEALTH
   Newborn screening for genetic disorders
   Trends in Medicare health plans
   Medicare prescription coverage
   Medicare HMOs provide less
   Rebuilding public health system
   Reforms in nursing homes
   Increases in assisted living facilities
   Hospital uncompensated care
HOUSING
   Conversion of Section 8 housing
HUMAN SERVICES
   Fragile families and marriage
   Fatherhood programs
   Social Security reform
INTERNATIONAL READER
   European Union and California economy
TRANSPORTATION
   Service at small community airports
WASHINGTON READER
   California Institute briefing on federal issues
STUDIES TO COME
   World economic outlook
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News is a very current compilation of items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau to supplement the public policy debate in California’s Capitol. To help share the latest information with state policymakers, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library’s website. This week's list of current articles in various public policy areas is presented below.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • Items in the State Library collection can be checked out to state officials and staff.

  • Access to all materials listed will be provided by the State Information Reference Center, either by e-mail to cslsirc@library.ca.gov or by calling 654-0261.

The following studies are currently on hand:

CALIFORNIA READER

CALIFORNIA READER

California Public Policy Bibliography 2003: Selected by Staff of the California Research Bureau, California State Library. Prepared for the Robert M. Hertzberg CAPITOL Institute Assembly Rules Committee. (The Library, Sacramento, California) February 2003. 235 p.

Full Text at: www.library.ca.gov/crb/03/bib/bib2003.pdf

["At the request of the CAPITOL Institute, California Research Bureau staff assembled a bibliography of selected articles on public policy topics of interest to Assembly standing committees. Most of these materials are easily accessible from libraries and on-line sources."]

[Request #S7893]

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CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT

CALIFORNIA

Hard Time: California's Criminal Justice Build-Up And Its Consequences. By the Liberty Hill Foundation (The Foundation, Santa Monica, California) 2003. 22 p.

Full Text at: www.libertyhill.org/common/to_print/Hard%20Time%20Color.pdf

["Although California spends 12 times more on prisons now than in 1980, the increased spending and tough-on-crime laws have done little to make the state or Los Angeles County safer according to the report. Crime already was decreasing in the state before lawmakers poured millions of dollars into building 24 prisons between 1980 and 2003, and passed laws such as 'three strikes, you're out' sentencing, according to the report." Los Angeles Daily News (April 17, 2003) 1]

[Request #S7894]

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DRUGS

Drug Use and Drug Policy Futures: Insights from a Colloquium. By Jonathan P. Caulkins and others, RAND Drug Policy Research Center. IP-246-DPRC. (RAND, Santa Monica, California) 2003. 6 p.

["American drug policy was quite different a hundred years ago, and in recent years it has changed rapidly in other developed countries. Are there reasons to think drug problems and policy could change rapidly again over the next 5 to 20 years? We believe so. In this issue paper, we lay out some reasons behind our belief and its implications for current policy."]

[Request #S7895]

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STATISTICS

Criminal Victimization in the United States: 2001. By The U.S. Department of Justice (The Department, Washington, DC) 2003. 143 p., tables.

Full Text at: www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/pub/pdf/cvus01.pdf

["The National Crime Victim's Survey is the Nation's second largest ongoing household survey. Survey data tell us how many rapes, sexual assaults, robberies, assaults, thefts, household burglaries, and motor vehicle thefts U.S. residents age 12 or older and their households experience each year."]

[Request #S7896]

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DEMOGRAPHY

CENSUS

Adjusted Census Estimates Revision II - Adjusted Data For States, Counties and Places. By Donna L. Kostanich. (United States Census Bureau, Washington, DC) April 9, 2003. 4 p.

Full Text at: www.census.gov/dmd/www/pdf/pp-60r.pdf

["This memorandum provides technical documentation and estimates or links to files containing adjusted population estimates for Census 2000. These adjusted estimates ... are provided for states, counties and places. A brief explanation of the source and limitations of the data is also provided."]

[Request #S7897]

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ECONOMY

CALIFORNIA

Western Economic Developments: Budget Problems Loom Large in the West, Economic Impact Less Clear. By the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. (The Bank, San Francisco, California) March 2003. 12 p.

Full Text at: www.frbsf.org/publications/economics/wed/2003/wed0303bk.pdf

["The San Francisco Federal Reserve Bank said that the regional economy 'hit the pause button' in the first three months of the year as consumers and businesses reined in spending in the lead-up to war with Iraq.... The report from the regional Fed bank -- whose district covers nine Western states, including California, and makes up nearly a fifth of national gross domestic product -- also cautioned that the states' budget problems pose 'significant challenges'." Los Angeles Times (April 4, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S7898]

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INFLATION

Time-Inconsistent Monetary Policies: Recent Research. By Richard Dennis. FRBSF Economic Letter. No. 2003-10. (The Bank, San Francisco, California) April 11, 2003. 4 p.

Full Text at: www.frbsf.org/publications/economics/letter/2003/el2003-10.pdf

["Time-inconsistency can affect more than just the average rate of inflation that prevails in the economy.... It can influence how policymakers respond to shocks and how resources are allocated through time. This Economic Letter looks at time-inconsistency, describing why the same mechanisms that can lead to higher average inflation also can hamper policymakers' efforts to keep inflation stable."]

[Request #S7899]

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INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

The Ever-Shifting Internet Population: a New Look at Internet Access and The Digital Divide. By Amanda Lenhart and others. (Pew Internet & American Life Project, Washington, DC) April 16, 2003. 46 p.

Full Text at: www.pewinternet.org/reports/pdfs/PIP_Shifting_Net_Pop_Report.pdf

["This report focuses on several new findings about those who say they do not use the Internet.... While 42% of Americans say they don't use the Internet, many of them have either been internet users at one time or have a once removed relationship with the Internet through family or household members."]

[Request #S7900]

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TRADE

Globalization In The San Francisco Bay Area: Trying To Stay At The Head Of The Class. By S. L. Bachman, Pacific Council on International Policy (The Council, Los Angeles, California) January 2003. 44 p.

Full Text at: www.pacificcouncil.org/pdfs/sf.pdf

["Globilization has helped the Bay Area reemerge as a leading actor on the world stage, and its challege now is to stay there. This is no easy task because the Bay Area's recent success has overburdened its infrastructure and threatened its famed quality of life and thus its competitive edge. This report examines the forces that have led to the region's success and examines what needs to be done to ensure that this success continues."]

[Request #S7905]

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EDUCATION

EDUCATION POLICY

Lawmakers Balk At Cost of Fed Education Law. By Pamela M. Prah. (Pew Center on the States, Washington, DC) April 8, 2003. 3 p.

Full Text at: www.stateline.org/print_story.do;jsessionid=1jhwbw6g31?storyId=298327

["Lawmakers in New Hampshire and Hawaii are considering measures that would let their states walk away from footing the bill for ... No Child Left Behind.... Iowa, New Jersey, North Dakota, Tennessee and Washington are among states that have resolutions calling for more federal funding to help implement the new testing and learning standards required by the federal education law."]

[Request #S7907]

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ETHNIC, RACIAL & CULTURAL DIVERSITY

Indian Education Act: An Act Relating to Education; Enacting the Indian Education Act; Prescribing Powers and Duties; Creating a Fund; Repealing and Enacting Sections of the NMSA 1978. By the New Mexico State Legislature. (The Legislature, Santa Fe, New Mexico) April 2003. 9 p.

["Richardson Signs into Law Indian-Education Legislation: The Act sets forth plans to improve teacher training, native-language preservation, culturally relevant curriculum, tribal participation in accountability and parent involvement in the schooling of American Indian children." Santa Fe New Mexican Online (April 5, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S7908]

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HIGHER EDUCATION

2003 Freshman Admissions to the University of California: Information Summary. By the UC Office of the President. (The Office, Oakland, California) April 16, 2003. 2 p.

Full Text at: www.ucop.edu/news/factsheets/2003/admissions_summary.pdf

["Preliminary figures for new freshmen from California show a continued rebound for under-represented minorities after a sharp drop in 1998, when a ban on affirmative action was imposed. However, African American admissions fell at the two most selective campuses -- UC Berkeley and UCLA. And American Indian and Latino admissions also declined slightly at UCLA." San Francisco Chronicle (April 18, 2003) A21.]

[Request #S7909]

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STATISTICS

The Nation's Report Card: Science 2000. By C.Y. O'Sullivan and others, National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education. NCES 2003-453. (The Center, Washington, DC) 2003. 267 p.

Full Text at: nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/pdf/main2000/2003453.pdf

["The report ... reveals that only 17 percent of twelfth graders were at or above the proficient level.... Data indicates that the number of bachelor's degrees conferred between 1989 and 2000 ... declined by 11.6 percent in engineering, 15.3 percent in engineering-related technologies, and 7.5 percent in architecture and related programs." Cadence (April 1, 2003) 10.]

[Request #S7910]

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Characteristics of Doctoral Scientists And Engineers in the United States: Detailed Statistical Tables. By Kelly H. Kang and others, National Science Foundation (The Foundation, Arlington, Virginia) 2003. 187 p.

Full Text at: www.nsf.gov/sbe/srs/nsf03310/pdf/nsf03310.pdf

["This report presents data on the demographic and employment characteristics of the nation's doctoral scientists and engineers.... The Survey of Doctorate Recipients (SDR) is a longitudinal demographic survey of science and engineering doctorate holders conducted for the National Science Foundation and for other federal agencies."]

[Request #S7911]

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EMPLOYMENT

PUBLIC EMPLOYEES

County of Riverside v. Superior Court of Riverside County. California Supreme Court. S107126. April 21, 2003. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.courtinfo.ca.gov/opinions/documents/S107126.PDF

["California cannot require city and county governments to submit to binding arbitration during labor disputes with law enforcement officers and firefighters, the California Supreme Court ruled.... The court held that the law permitting binding arbitration violated a state constitutional provision that forbids the Legislature from delegating municipal functions to a private party." Los Angeles Times (April 22, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S7912]

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RETIREMENT

Retirement Income Data: Improvements Could Better Support Analysis Of Future Retirees' Prospects. By the U.S. General Accounting Office. GAO-03-337. (The Office, Washington, DC) March 2003. 87 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/new.items/d03337.pdf

["Future demographic trends include a doubling of the nation's retiree population and only modest labor force growth, leading to concerns about retirement income adequacy for future generations.... Experts ... cited priorities for improving retirement data that fit into two broad categories: obtaining better data from employers on employee benefits and obtaining better data by linking more individual and household surveys with administrative data."]

[Request #S7913]

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ENERGY

Renewable Energy: Strategic Opportunities for the Great Central Valley. By Collaborative Economics. Prepared for New Valley Connexions, Great Valley Center. (The Center, Modesto, California) March 2003. 42 p.

Full Text at: www.greatvalley.org/nvc/projects/coecon/energy_report.pdf

["A study released by the Great Valley Center underscores the potential for the Central Valley to become a leader in renewable energy - and the barriers to its success.... If the Valley used farm byproducts that otherwise would pollute the environment, it could chip away at its worsening air pollution and help meet the power needs of a population that will more than double to 12 million people in the next 20 years, the report notes.... Among the barriers: large capital investment demands for new technologies, the high cost of renewable energy compared to fossil fuels and the lack of workers skilled in renewable energy development." Sacramento Bee (April 10, 2003) D1.]

[Request #S7914]

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Generating Solutions: How Clean, Renewable Energy Is Boosting Local Economies And Saving Consumers Money. By Alison Cassady, Environment California. (Environment California, Los Angeles, California) April 2003. 41 p.

Full Text at: www.environmentcalifornia.org/reports/generatingsolutions03.pdf

["California generates 10 percent of its electricity using solar power, wind and other renewable resources, making it the leader among the states. But more needs to be done to reduce the state's dependence on coal, oil and nuclear power, said a report released by an environmental advocacy group.... The report says California has the capability of producing 81 percent of its electricity using renewable resources. The state already is committed to producing 20 percent of its energy using renewable resources by 2017." San Diego Union Tribune (April 17, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S7915]

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ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES

AIR POLLUTION

Control of Emissions of Air Pollution from Nonroad Diesel Engines and Fuel: Prepublication release. By the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (The Agency, Washington, DC) April 15, 2003.

["The Environmental Protection Agency proposed to force tractors, bulldozers and other diesel vehicles that do not run on roads to cut their harmful exhausts by 90% or more. The new regulations, if imposed after public comment, would have a dramatic impact on air quality, particularly in such pollution-choked regions as Los Angeles and California's San Joaquin Valley. Although relatively few in number, these vehicles, which are only modestly regulated, account for 44% of the particulate matter, or soot, and 12% of the smog-producing nitrogen oxides from all vehicles nationwide." Los Angeles Times (April 16, 2003) A26.]

Diesel emission program summary. 1 p.
http://www.epa.gov/nonroad/f03008.htm

Notice of Proposed Rulemaking. 440 p.
http://www.epa.gov/nonroad/preamb0415.pdf

Revised Rules. 181 p.
http://www.epa.gov/nonroad/reg041503.pdf

[Request #S7916]

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Ultrafine Particulate Pollutants Induce Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Damage. By Ning Li, Department of Medicine, UCLA, and others. IN: Environmental Health Perspectives. vol. 11, no. 4. (April 2003) pp. 455-460.

["A team of Southern California researchers has discovered that microscopic airborne particles can disrupt the inner mechanics of cells.... The particles are so small -- about 1,000 could fit inside the period at the end of this sentence -- that they easily bypass the body's defense mechanisms. Very tiny particles travel beyond the lungs and bloodstream to penetrate deep inside cells. The pollutant accumulates within a critical component that powers the cell and maintains its function. Damage to that cellular component is known to lead to an assortment of diseases." Los Angeles Times (April 7, 2003) B1.]

[Request #S7917]

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BROWNFIELDS

Financing Brownfields Cleanup and Redevelopment. By L. Cheryl Runyon, National Conference of State Legislatures. State Legislative Report. Vol. 28, No. 4. (NCSL, Denver, Colorado) March 2003. 11 p.

["State grants, low-interest loans and tax incentives, in combination with local tax increment financing, has spurred activity to revitalize urban centers, renovate existing infrastructure, and diminish pressure on development of greenfields. Federal funds are playing a key role ... in leveraging financial investments from the private sector to increase the level of redevelopment activity."]

[Request #S7918]

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EARTHQUAKES

Is a Powerful Quake Likely to Strike in the Next 30 Years? : USGS Fact Sheet. By the U.S. Geological Survey. And Summary of Earthquake Probabilities in the San Francisco Bay Region: 2003-2032. By The Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities. (The Survey, Menlo Park, California) April 22, 2003.

["In the most detailed investigation ever made of earthquake hazards throughout the Bay Area, scientists warned that at least one severely damaging and deadly quake is very likely here within less than 30 years.... The purpose of the interagency effort was to once again alert Bay Area residents, builders and city officials that new seismic knowledge is convincing scientists ever more strongly that somewhere in this earth-shaking region a Big One is bound to strike, sooner or later, and that only preparedness can minimize the devastation." San Francisco Chronicle (April 22, 2003) 1.]

Fact Sheet. 4 p.
http://geopubs.wr.usgs.gov/fact-sheet/fs039-03/fs039-03.pdf

Summary. 6 p.
http://quake.usgs.gov/research/seismology/wg02/summary/WG_summary.pdf

[Request #S7919]

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ENDANGERED SPECIES

Center for Biological Diversity, et al. v. Gale Norton, et al. U.S. District Court, Northern District of California. Complaint for Declaratory and Injunctive Relief. April 2003.

Full Text at: www.earthjustice.org/news/documents/4-03/MYLFComplaint.pdf

["The government's moratorium on new listings under the federal Endangered Species Act is illegally endangering a rare California amphibian, environmental groups claim in a lawsuit....The service decided in January that even though the frog merits protection, the service's employees and budget already are devoted to responding to other endangered species lawsuits. 'We agree the species is in trouble,' said service spokeswoman Patricia Foulk. 'But as of now, this is one more species that is, frankly, a victim of the litigation battles.'" " Associated Press (April 1, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S7901]

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WATER POLICY

America's Most Endangered Rivers of 2003: Ten Rivers Reaching the Crossroads in the Next 12 Months. By American Rivers (American Rivers, Washington, DC) April 2003. 34 p.

Full Text at: www.amrivers.org/docs/MostEndangeredRivers2003.pdf

["Water scarcity is the primary threat to five of the rivers ... Scientists warn that shortages will worsen as we enter a century of increasing demands of fresh water and climatic uncertainty. Left unchecked, these problems will threaten virtually every river in every region of America. However, decisive action by the nation's leaders now can still prevent many future crises."]

[Request #S7921]

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GENERAL GOVERNMENT

2003 Congressional Pig Book Summary. By Citizens Against Government Waste (The Citizens, Washington, DC) 2003. 49 p.

Full Text at: www.cagw.org/site/DocServer/Pig_Book_2003.pdf?docID=302

["Lawmakers ran up the highest tab ever on pork-barrel spending for the 2003 federal budget, a watchdog group said. The nonpartisan government watchdog group released its annual 'Pig book,' describing what it considers the most egregious examples of so-called congressional pork-barrel spending." Press Enterprise (April 10, 2003) B4.]

[Request #S7922]

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AUDITS AND INVESTIGATIONS

University of California's Costs Claimed and Related Internal Controls for Operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory. By the Inspector General, U.S. Department of Energy. (The Department, Washington, DC) April 2003. 24 p.

Full Text at: www.ig.doe.gov/pdf/ig-0596.pdf

["Weak financial controls at Los Alamos National Laboratory allowed about $14.6 million in questionable charges for meals, travel and inadequate internal audits in the last three years.... Inspector General Gregory Friedman recommended that the Energy Department require UC to repay any of the $14.6 million found to be unallowable after further review and to improve its system of financial controls." Los Angeles Times (April 22, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S7923]

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COURTS

Drug Court Monitoring, Evaluation, And Management Information Systems: National Scope Needs Assessment. By SEARCH, The National Consortium for Justice Information and Statistics and Victoria S. Cashman, Cashman and Associates. Prepared for The Bureau of Justice Assistance and The U.S. Department of Justice. NCJ 195077. (The Department, Washington, DC) 2003. 95 p.

Full Text at: www.ncjrs.org/pdffiles1/bja/195077.pdf

["The Drug Courts Program Office (DCPO) established initiatives to quantify the courts' needs for information technology and evaluation training and technical assistance, and to develop training and technical assistance solutions to address drug court priority needs. This report documents that quantification ... and identifies a series of proposed DCPO initiatives."]

[Request #S7924]

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EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

Department of Homeland Security Releases Grant Allocations. By Federal Funds Information for States. FFIS Issue Brief, 03-12. (FFIS, Washington, DC) April 3, 2003. 6 p.

["The DHS Office for Domestic Preparedness has allocated $566 million in grants for state homeland security. The Federal Emergency Management Agency has allocated $165 million for the Emergency Management Performance Grant program. This Issue Brief explains the purposes of these programs, their guidelines and restrictions, and the formulas used to calculate their allocation."]

[Request #S7925]

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EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

Bioterrorism: Preparedness Varied Across State And Local Jurisdictions. By The U.S. General Accounting Office. GAO-03-373 (The Office, Washington, DC) April 2003. 53 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/new.items/d03373.pdf

["Despite the increase in bioterrorism preparedness across the United States, the country's public health system still has major gaps and could be overwhelmed if there is a significant increase in cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome, experts testified.... Shortcomings related to SARS included that many hospitals lack the capacity to respond to large-scale outbreaks." United Press International (April 9, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S7926]

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State Spending Of Homeland Security Funds. By The National Emergency Management Association (The Association, Lexington, Kentucky) April 2, 2003. 6 p.

Full Text at: nemaweb.org/Library/Documents/State_Administration_of_Homeland_Security_Funds.pdf

["According to the 37 states and 2 territories that responded to the survey, a total of $347.7 million in homeland security funding has been provided by the federal government for fiscal years 1999-2000. As of March 28, 2003 approximately $263.2 million or 76% of the funds have been expended or obligated by states. Most of the remaining 24% are in the process of being obligated."]

[Request #S7927]

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FEDERAL GRANTS

Release of WIA Allotments Contains a Few Surprises for States. By Federal Funds Information for States. FFIS Issue Brief. 03-15. (FFIS, Washington, DC) April 10, 2003. 9 p.

["On April 1, 2003, the U.S. Department of Labor released final program year (PY) 2003 formula grants to states for Workforce Investment Act programs and Employment Services programs.... The allotments result in large swings in funding levels for most states, especially for the dislocated worker program."]

[Request #S7928]

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Competitive Grant Update. By Federal Funds Information for States. FFIS Competitive Grant. 03-03 & 03-04. (FFIS, Washington, DC) March 19 - April 8, 2003. 26 p.

["Includes availability of funds for: "Technology Opportunities Program;" "Improving Literacy Through School Libraries Program;" "Early First Program;" "Individuals with Disabilities Recreational Program , "Homeless Veterans' Reintegration Program;" "Pollution Prevention Grants;" "Effective Adolescent Treatment;" "Pre-Disaster Mitigation Program;" "Farmland Protection Program;" "Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grants;" and others."]

[Request #S7929]

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TRIBAL RELATIONS

An Act Relating to Executive Reorganization, Permitting the Governor to Reorganize Certain Agencies by Executive Order in 2003 to Make Them Cabinet-Level Departments; Requiring Legislative Approval of Such Executive Order Reorganizations;. By the New Mexico State Legislature. (The Legislature, Santa Fe, New Mexico) April 2003. 6 p.

["Governor Bill Richardson signed House Bill 585, which includes language elevating the Office of Indian Affairs to cabinet-level status.... The Office of Indian Affairs was one of four state agencies that were elevated to cabinet-level status." Farmington Daily Times (April 11, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S7932]

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HEALTH

GENETICS

Newborn Screening: Characteristics of State Programs. By the U.S. General Accounting Office. (The Office, Washington, DC) March 2003. 1 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/highlights/d03449high.pdf

["While the number of genetic and metabolic disorders included in state newborn screening programs ranges from 4 to 36, most states screen for 8 or fewer disorders.... States consider criteria, such as whether the disorder is treatable ... and the cost of the screening for additional disorders."]

[Request #S7933]

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MANAGED HEALTH CARE

"Medicare+Choice Plans Continue to Shift More Costs to Enrollees." By Lori Achman and Marsha Gold, Mathematica Policy Research. Prepared for the Commonwealth Fund. (The Fund, Washington, D.C.) April 2003. 10 p.

Full Text at: www.mathematica-mpr.com/PDFs/MCshiftcosts.pdf

["Much like in previous years, Medicare+Choice plans have continued to raise premiums and beneficiaries' cost-sharing, while at the same time limiting coverage of supplemental benefits such as prescription drugs coverage.... Those imposing an annual limit of $500 (for prescription drugs) or less increased to 20.5 percent in 2003 from 16 percent in 2002. Two of those plans require 70 percent coinsurance, while the third plan has a prescription drug deductible of $6,250."]

[Request #S7935]

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MEDICAID

State Medicaid Prescription Drug Expenditures for Medicare - Medicaid Dual Eligibles: Estimates of Medicaid Savings and Federal Expenditures Resulting from Expanded Medicare Prescription Coverage. By Stacy Berg Dale and James M. Verdier. The Commonwealth Fund. (The Fund, New York, New York) April 2003. 12 p.

Full Text at: www.cmwf.org/programs/medfutur/dale_rxdualeligibles_ib_627.pdf

["Legislation moving through Congress could save California more than $1 billion annually in paying for prescription drugs for its senior or disabled citizens on both Medicare and Medicaid, according to a study."]

[Request #S7936]

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MEDICARE

2003 Guide to California Medicare HMOs. By the California HealthCare Foundation and the Consumer's Union. (The Foundation, Oakland, California) April 2003. 111 p.

Full Text at: www.calmedicarehmos.org/documents/home/GuideToCalMedicareHMOs2003_NoBlanks.pdf

["During the past three years, the value of Medicare HMOs has noticeably declined. Premiums, co-payments and deductibles have gone up. At the same time, benefits like prescription drugs, key to the health of many seniors, have gotten worse.... The study ranked HMO plans according to the out-of-pocket price seniors pay and the benefits they receive." Contra Costa Times (April 2, 2003) F4.]

[Request #S7903]

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PUBLIC HEALTH

To Protect & Prevent: Rebuilding California's Public Health System. By the Little Hoover Commission. (The Commission, Sacramento, California) April 2003. 136 p.

Full Text at: www.lhc.ca.gov/lhcdir/170/report170.pdf

["Report: Disease Control Weak Link in State Safety: California's public health system for control of infectious disease and possible bioterrorism is the weak link in the state's homeland defense, a watchdog agency has concluded.... The report warns of gaps among state and local agencies charged with protecting the public against old threats such as hospital infections and emerging diseases such as severe acute respiratory syndrome, or SARS." Sacramento Bee (April 11, 2003) A3.]

[Request #S7934]

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RESIDENTIAL CARE

Better Read the Small Print: An Analysis of Admission Agreements in California's Residential Care Facilities for the Elderly. By the California Advocates for Nursing Home Reform. (The Advocates, San Francisco, California) March 2003. 20 p.

Full Text at: www.canhr.org/pdfs/RCFE_Report_0303.pdf

["In the admission agreements analyzed, there is a pattern of omitting or misrepresenting important legal or regulatory requirements especially in the residents' rights and eviction areas. These agreements were evaluated by criteria based on law and regulation and consumer principles of full disclosure."]

[Request #S7930]

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Assisted Living. By Wendy Fox-Grage and Robert Mollica, National Conference of State Legislatures. Legisbrief. Vol. 11, No. 24. (NCSL, Denver, Colorado) April/May 2003. 2 p.

["Currently, there are nearly 1 million beds in more than 35,000 licensed assisted living facilities, which marks an almost 15 percent increase from 2000. Three states -- California, Florida and Pennsylvania -- account for roughly one third of these.... The trend over the past five to 10 years has been for states to offer flexibility to accommodate aging-in-place, allowing people with higher levels of impairment to remain in assisted living while providing health-related services."]

[Request #S7931]

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UNINSURED POPULATION

Reassessing Hospital Uncompensated Care in California: Implications for Research and Policy. By Leonard Finocchio and others, California Policy Research Center, University of California. CPRC Brief. Vol. 15, No. 3. (The Center, Berkeley, California) March 2003. 4 p.

Full Text at: www.ucop.edu/cprc/uncompcarebrf.pdf

["With 6.3 million California residents without health insurance in 2001, the 'free' services that hospitals provide are a crucial element of the state's safety net.... [Included are] recommendations for researchers, policymakers and hospital administrators to consider in order to address the issue of hospital uncompensated care in California."]

[Request #S7902]

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HOUSING

AFFORDABLE HOUSING

Flexibility Provided To States Under Housing Voucher Block Grant Would Be Accompanied By Major Constraints. By Will Fischer and Barbara Sard. (Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, Washington, DC) Arpil 17, 2003. 6 p.

Full Text at: www.cbpp.org/4-17-03hous.pdf

["The Administration has stated that it will submit legislation to convert the housing voucher program (sometimes known as the 'Section 8' voucher program) to a block grant to the states in 2005.... While a block grant could provide added flexibility in a number of areas, it appears this flexibility would be constrained in important ways."]

[Request #S7937]

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HUMAN SERVICES

FAMILIES

"Fragile Families and Marriage." By Courtney Jarchow, National Conference of State Legislatures. IN: State Poverty Policies, vol. 1, no. 2 (March/April 2003). pp. 1, 4.

["Approximately 40 percent of children in female-headed households were poor in 2000, compared to only 8 percent of children in married, two-parent households.... As more communities and government organizations fund programs to encourage healthy marriage, researchers will be better equipped to evaluate their effectiveness on fragile families."]

[Request #S7938]

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FATHERHOOD

Fatherhood Programs That Work. Compiled By Jacqueline Greer, Social Policy Action Network. (The Network, Washington, DC) April 2003. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.span-online.org/father_programs.pdf

["To help fatherhood programs improve services and better meet their clients needs, Social Policy Action Network has collected and written profiles of some of the most effective fatherhood programs in the country. The programs help fathers overcome barriers such as child support debt, lack of job training, and need for parenting skills. Each profile contains program contacts who can provide additional information."]

[Request #S7939]

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SOCIAL SECURITY

Social Security Reform: Information on Using a Voluntary Approach to Individual Accounts. By the U.S. General Accounting Office. GAO-03-309. (The Office, Washington, DC) March 10, 2003. 72 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/new.items/d03309.pdf

["GAO focuses on the issues that pertain specifically to a volunteer approach: (1) how voluntary plans can affect individuals; (2) how they could affect the total cost of the retirement system; and (3) how the role of educational efforts relates to the participation decision.]

[Request #S7940]

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INTERNATIONAL READER

The Transatlantic Partnership and the Significance of the European Union to California and Its Economy. By Guenter Burghardt, Ambassador and Head of the Delegation of the European Commission to the United States, and others. Presented to the California Senate Committee on Banking, Commerce and International Trade and the Senate Subcommittee on California European Trade Development. 1148-S. (The Committee, Sacramento, California) March 6, 2002. Various pagings.

["The EU is California's largest single investor, amounting to 46 percent, or roughly 53 percent of the total investment in the state. In terms of employment, exports to the EU provide employment to over 224,000 Californians, and EU investments support over 284,000 jobs."]

[Request #S7920]

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TRANSPORTATION

AIRPORTS

Commercial Aviation: Factors Affecting Efforts to Improve Air Service at Small Community Airports. By the U.S. General Accounting Office. GAO-03-330. (The Office, Washington, DC) 2003. 19 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/new.items/d03540t.pdf

["The airline industry, facing unprecedented financial losses as a result of the economic downturn and the terrorist attacks, has taken steps to minimize losses, including reducing or eliminating service to some small communities.... At communities GAO studied in depth, financial incentives were most effective in attracting new service."]

[Request #S7941]

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WASHINGTON READER

California Capitol Hill Bulletin. By the California Institute For Federal Policy Research. Vol. 10, Bulletin 10 (April 11, 2003) 8 p.

Full Text at: www.calinst.org/bulletins/b1010.pdf

[Includes: "Delegation Gathering Signatures For Letter Urging Increased SCAAP Funding;" "Budget Accord Reached, Postpones Tax Issue;" "House Nearly Completes Work on Comprehensive Energy Bill;" "Senate Environment Committee Approves Ethanol Mandate;" "Manufacturing Extension Letter Garners California Signatures;" "Medical Marijuana Federal Trial Defense Bill Introduced" and others.]

[Request #S7942]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

ECONOMY

WORLD ECONOMY

World Economic Outlook. By The International Monetary Fund (The Fund, Washington, DC) April 2003. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/weo/2003/01/index.htm

["Thanks to new security checks, goods and people move far less easily than they once did. World trade, which bounded ahead by 7 percent a year in the 1990s, seems to have stalled.... The International Monetary Fund's World Economic Outlook forecast 'below-trend' growth for both sides of the Atlantic." New York Times (April 13, 2003) 6. NOTE: World Economic Outlook ... will be available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S7906]

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