Subject: Studies in the News 03-22 (April 10, 2003)


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News
Children and Family Supplement


Contents This Week

Introductory Material EDUCATION
   Retention incentive programs for pre-k staff
   Retaining child care staff
   Training and retaining pre-k staff
   Systematic training and early learning
   Teacher preparation and preschool children
   Quality infant-toddler programs
   Smart Start and child care quality
HEALTH
   Stress and young children
   Unmet need for child mental health care
   Mental health of children
   Perinatal drug use
HUMAN SERVICES
   Child welfare staff retention
   Welfare-to-work and children
STUDIES TO COME
   Early childbearing and cognitive ability
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News is a very current compilation of items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau to supplement the public policy debate in California’s Capitol. To help share the latest information with state policymakers, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library’s website. This week's list of current articles in various public policy areas is presented below.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • Items in the State Library collection can be checked out to state officials and staff.

  • Access to all materials listed will be provided by the State Information Reference Center, either by e-mail to cslsirc@library.ca.gov or by calling 654-0261.

The following studies are currently on hand:

EDUCATION

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

Training and Retaining Early Care and Education Staff Training Projects: Evaluation - Year One Progress Report 2001-2002. By Elizabeth Burr and Bridget O'Brien, Policy Analysis For California Education. (PACE, Berkeley, California) February 2003. 12 p.

Full Text at: pace.berkeley.edu/Pol.Br.03-3_Press.pdf

["This report raises several issues for program designers and policymakers, providing more data but also raising further questions about how to stabilize and improve the quality of the workforce. They are: 1) the relationships among training projects and community colleges are critical for sustaining project elements after First 5 California funding ends; 2) the training projects may be better able than community colleges to meet the diverse needs of entry level ECE (Early Childhood Education) workers; 3) training projects should tailor their intervention to a targeted population or program goal."]

[Request #S7784]

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Matching Funds For Retention Incentives For Early Care and Education Staff: Evaluation - Year One Progress Report 2001-2002. By Bridget Hamre and others, Policy Analysis For California Education. (PACE, Berkeley, California) February 2003. 12 p.

Full Text at: pace.berkeley.edu/Pol.Br.03-1_Press.pdf

["This Progress Report provides preliminary findings regarding questions on CRI (Child Care Retention Incentive) program participants and effectiveness.... This preliminary information may be useful for designing new CRI programs, as well as for state and local First 5 commissions and program planners in the continued implementation of current CRI programs."]

[Request #S7785]

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Training and Retaining Early Care and Education Staff: Bay Area Child Care Retention Incentive Programs: Evaluation - Year One Progress Report 2001-2002. By Margaret Bridges and Jennifer Carlat, Policy Analysis For California Education. (PACE, Berkeley, California) February 2003. 12 p.

Full Text at: pace.berkeley.edu/Pol.Br.03-2_Press.pdf

["Preliminary findings suggest that the CRI (Child Care Retention Incentive) programs in Alameda and San Francisco include a diverse group of center-based ECE (Early Childhood Education) staff. In terms of initial training effects, one year after receiving their stipends, significantly more of these CRI recipients had taken ECE college courses and workshops than staff in the comparison group. In addition, retention rates were high in both counties, although only recipients in San Francisco stayed in their centers and in the ECE field at a significantly higher rate than those in the comparison group."]

[Request #S7786]

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A Systemwide Approach to Improving Early Childhood Program Quality in the Detroit Metropolitan Area. By A. Clay Shouse and Ann S. Epstein, High/Scope Educational Research Foundation. (The Foundation, Ypsilanti, Michigan) January 2003. 32 p.

Full Text at: www.highscope.org/NewsNotes/McGregor-report.pdf

["A major evaluation of systemwide training for early childhood staff and supervisors concludes that a large-scale and systematic approach to training is a feasible and promising approach for improving early childhood learning, especially for children at risk who need high-quality educational services the most." Connect for Kids (March 31, 2003).]

[Request #S7787]

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Teacher Preparation and Teacher-Child Interaction in Preschools. By Susan Kontos and Amanda Wilcox-Herzog. ERIC Digest EDO-PS-02-11. (Educational Resources Information Center, The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, Illinois) October 2002. 2 p.

Full Text at: ericeece.org/pubs/digests/2002/kontos02.html

["It is generally agreed that because so much basic early learning occurs through interactive experiences when children are very young, the quality of teacher-child interactions contributes substantially to effects that early group care and preschool education have on children. This Digest discusses the research on general and specialized education as factors in teachers' interactions with children."]

[Request #S7788]

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Research on Quality in Infant-Toddler Programs. By Alice Sterling Honig. ERIC Digest EDO-PS-02-19. (Educational Resources Information Center, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, Illinois) November 2002. 2 p.

Full Text at: ericeece.org/pubs/digests/2002/honig02.html

["Concern about the quality of infant-toddler care programs has grown recently in response to two factors. The first is the need for infant-toddler care by employed parents. By 1997, 73% of children under 3 years regularly spent time in nonparental care. The second factor is the research that emphasizes the importance of brain development in the early years. This Digest introduces some of the many issues related to the quality of infant-toddler care."]

[Request #S7789]

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Smart Start And Preschool Child Care Quality In NC: Change Over Time And Relation To Children's Readiness. By The FPG-UNC Smart Start Evaluation Team, University of North Carolina. (The Team, Chapel Hill, North Carolina) March 2003. 21 p.

Full Text at: www.ncsmartstart.org/overview/releases/quality.pdf

["Three main conclusions can be drawn from this study: between 1993 and 2002, child care quality steadily and significantly increased; participation in Smart Start-funded activities was significantly positively related to child care quality; and, children who attended higher quality centers score significanly higher on measures of skills and abilities deemed important for success in kindergarten than children from lower-quality centers."]

[Request #S7790]

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HEALTH

CHILDREN

Stress and Young Children. By Jan Jewett and Karen Peterson. ERIC Digest DOO-PS-02-20. (Educational Resources Information Center, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, Illinois) December 2002. 2 p.

Full Text at: ericeece.org/pubs/digests/2002/jewett02.html

["Although the research literature tends to focus on the impact of single-variable stressors on children's development, in real-life situations, children experience stress from multiple sources. Researchers note that multiple stressors interact with one another and can have cumulative effects. This Digest discusses how children experience and adapt to stress, and offers suggestions to teachers and parents on preventing and reducing children's stress."]

[Request #S7791]

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MENTAL HEALTH

Unmet Need For Mental Health Care Among U.S. Children: Variation By Ethnicity And Insurance Status. By Sheryl H. Kataoka, and others. IN: American Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 159, no. 9 (September 2002) pp. 1548-1555.

Full Text at: ajp.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/reprint/159/9/1548.pdf

["These findings reveal that most children who need a mental health evaluation do not receive services and that Latinos and the uninsured have especially high rates of unmet need relative to other children. Rates of use of mental health services are extremely low among preschool children. Research clarifying the reasons for high rates of unmet need in specific groups can help inform policy and clinical programs."]

[Request #S6133]

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No One's Priority: The Plight of Children With Serious Mental Disorders in Medicaid Systems. By Chris Koyanagi and Rafael Semansky, Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law. (The Center, Washington, DC) Winter 2003. 18 p.

Full Text at: www.bazelon.org/issues/children/publications/focusgroups/combinedfocusgrpreport.pdf

["This report documents how, over the past decade, states have adjusted their Medicaid programs to include a wider array of home-and community-based mental health services for children... The study concludes that major reform is needed in the state systems for providing services to children with mental disorders."]

[Request #S7793]

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PRENATAL DRUG USE

Trends in Perinatal Drug and Alcohol Use in California, 1991-1998: Final Research Report. By Ellen Wolfe and others, Institute for Health Policy Studies, University of California, San Francisco. Prepared for the California Policy Research Center. (The Center, Berkeley, California) April 2003. 24 p.

Full Text at: www.ucop.edu/cprc/perinataldruguse.pdf

["This study utilized available data reported to the State from hospitals and counties.... The data sources included information from hospital discharges, birth certificates, and death certificates.... Of nearly six million California births between 1991 and 1998, 1.19% (70.559 births) were identified as drug- and/or alcohol-exposed based on discharge diagnostic codes."]

[Request #S7794]

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HUMAN SERVICES

CHILDREN

Child Welfare: HHS Could Play a Greater Role in Helping Child Welfare Agencies Recruit and Retain Staff. By the U.S. General Accounting Office. GAO-03-357. (The Office, Washington,DC) March 31, 2003. 57 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/new.items/d03357.pdf

["GAO concluded that Health and Human Services' role in identifying and addressing the challenges that child protection agencies face has been limited.... It found that the absences of a stable, skilled and attentive workforce threaten these agencies' abilities to provide services for more than 800,000 children estimated to spend some time in foster care each year. It recommended that HHS provide states with technical assistance needed to address caseloads, training and staffing issues." United Press International (April 3, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S7795]

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WELFARE TO WORK

"Mothers' Transitions from Welfare to Work and the Well-Being of Preschoolers and Adolescents." By P. Lindsay Chase-Lansdale, Northwestern University, and others. IN: Science, vol. 299 (March 7, 2003) pp. 1548-1552.

["Poor children suffer no psychological damage when their mothers move from welfare to work, as millions of women have in recent years, a major new study says. Among adolescents in such families, mental health may actually have improved." The New York Times (March 7, 2003).]

[Request #S7792]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

POVERTY

"Association of Early Childbearing and Low Cognitive Ability." By Darlene Shearer and others. IN: Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, vol. 34, no. 5 (September/October 2002) pp. 236-243.

[“The stereotype of young teen mothers is that they tend to be from low-income families and not as bright as other teenagers. Girls who had children early also had sexual intercourse for the first time an average of almost two years earlier than their classmates. They were also less likely to have had a sexuality education course and were less likely to know when during the menstrual cycle women are most fertile…. Early teen moms also tended to grow up in families below the poverty level, and their educational goals were two years lower than those of other girls.” Youth Today (February 2003) 42.]

[Request #S7796]

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