Subject: Studies in the News 03-2 (January 10, 2003)


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News


California -- One Hundred and Fifty Years Ago

January 3, 1853 - "On January 3rd, 1853, the Legislature assembled again in Vallejo for the Fourth Session. Compared with the previous year, conditions were little better, and the weather worse. Transportion and communication, in spite of great effort, fell far short of the needs of the Legislature. Proponents of removal viewed, on the one hand, Sacramento recovering from a flood and, on the other, the town of Benicia offering the free use of its new city hall and a port of call at which all river traffic stopped. Spurred perhaps by the immediate prospect of an uncomfortable session in Vallejo, the Legislature passed a bill on February 4 ordering the seat of government to be moved instantly to the City of Benicia. "  www.library.ca.gov/history/previous-ca-capitals.ht  

1853 - "Benicia Arsenal - Captain Charles P. Stone, with 21 enlisted men, established Benicia Arsenal as an ordnance depot.... Between 1853 and 1863, Congress authorized $550,000 to be spent on the establishment, and some 15 stone and frame buildings were constructed. The arsenal was first called 'California Ordnance Depot,' then 'Benicia Arsenal Depot,' and finally, 'Benicia Arsenal.' It played an important role in crises such as the Indian wars. Some of its original buildings are in use today."  ceres.ca.gov/geo_area/counties/Solano/landmarks.ht  

Contents This Week

Introductory Material CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT
   Domestic violence prevalence
   DUI fatality rates
   Stolen firearms resold
   Hate crime statistics
CULTURE AND SOCIETY
   Sharing democratic values
   National survey of Latinos
   Racial integration in metropolitan areas
DEMOGRAPHY
   Demographic trends
ECONOMY
   California's bioscience industries
   Texas' military base planning update
   Redevelopment agency revenues
   High-growth industries in California
   Email and work productivity
   Sustaining volunteerism
   Collaboration in science and technology
   Oversight for securities industry
EDUCATION
   Per-pupil spending among schools
   Latino flight to private schools
   Service learning in the classroom
   Teacher development reforms
EMPLOYMENT
   Business tax incentives and disabled workers
   Managing agency workforces
ENERGY
   California losing clean power edge
   Changes in natural gas market price
   Public benefit of energy efficiency
   Consultants push municipal-owned utilities
ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES
   Formula grant categories
   Regulating environmental risks
   Floodplain management
   Federal wetlands mitigation plan
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
   Long road to election reform
   Formula grant categories
   California's share of federal grants
   Positive focus for inaugural address
   State of the State speech
   State and local revenue systems
   Corporate tax revenue trends
   Internet sales tax proposals
HEALTH
   Antibiotic resistant bacteria in U.S. poultry
   End-of-life care costly
   Catholic hospitals health care safety net
   Medi-Cal overpaid for equipment and supplies
HOUSING
   Affordable housing trends
HUMAN SERVICES
   Los Angeles county adoption review
   Child support enforcement
   Hunger and homelessness in America’s cities
   Reduced caseloads and economic downturn
   Increasing work requirements for welfare recipients
   Effect of domestic violence on marriage and children
TRANSPORTATION
   Cell phones and driving
   Improving traffic safety
   Seismic retrofit expenditures
   Federal highway funding
WASHINGTON READER
   California Institute's briefing on federal issues
STUDIES TO COME
   Secretin cure and autism
   Educating public health professionals
   Developing town centers and urban villages
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News is a very current compilation of items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau to supplement the public policy debate in California’s Capitol. To help share the latest information with state policymakers, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library’s website. This week's list of current articles in various public policy areas is presented below.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • Items in the State Library collection can be checked out to state officials and staff.

  • Access to all materials listed will be provided by the State Information Reference Center, either by e-mail to cslsirc@library.ca.gov or by calling 654-0261.

The following studies are currently on hand:

CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

The Prevalence Of Domestic Violence In California. By Alicia Bugarian, California Research Bureau, California State Library. Prepared for California Assemblymember Rebecca Cohn (CRB, Sacramento, California) November 2002. 74 p.

Full Text at: www.library.ca.gov/crb/02/16/02-016.pdf

["This report presents data compiled from a survey of California's domestic violence shelters and programs, and identifies and analyzes data compiled by law enforcement, health care providers, and state surveys of women's health, in order to better understand domestic violence prevalence in California"]

[Request #S7066]

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DRIVING UNDER THE INFLUENCE

State Alcohol Related Fatality Rates. By the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, United States Department of Transportation (The Administration, Washington, DC) December 2002. 117 p.

Full Text at: www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/injury/alcohol/3d/3DFY2002/alcoholcrackdown/809-528AlcRatescolor.pdf

["California had fewer drunk driving deaths per miles driven than all but a few states in the nation and has posted one of the biggest drops in the fatality rate in the last 20 years, according to a federal study.... Between 1982 and 2001, the rate of drunk driving deaths in California dropped 70%, from 165 fatalities per 1 million miles driven to 50 deaths, according to a study.... Based on these statistics, California ranked among such states as Utah, Vermont, Minnesota, New Jersey and New York in claiming the lowest drunk driving fatality rates." Los Angeles Times (December 19, 2002) 2.]

[Request #S7065]

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GUNS & GUN CONTROL

Stolen Firearms: Arming The Enemy. By the Americans for Gun Safety Foundation (The Foundation, Washington, DC) December 2002. 23 p.

Full Text at: w3.agsfoundation.com/media/AGS-fin.pdf

["California ranks first nationally in the number of guns made, sold and stolen.... California also has the nation's largest population and ranks 29th in guns stolen per resident. Nearly 1.l7 million guns have been stolen nationwide in the last decade according to a report by the foundation.... ." Associated Press State & Local Wire (December 20, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S7067]

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HATE CRIME

Uniform Crime Report: Hate Crimes Statistics 2001. By Federal Bureau of Investigation. (The Bureau, Washington, DC) 2002. 142 p.

Full Text at: www.fbi.gov/ucr/01hate.pdf

["Hate crimes in the United States increased 21 percent from 8,063 in 2000 to 9,730 in 2001. Most of last year's hate crimes were motivated by racial bias (45 percent) followed by biases against ethnicity or national origin (22 percent), religion (19 percent), sexual orientation (14 percent) and disability (0.3 percent). The most dramatic change noted by the report was a more than 1,600 percent increase in reported hate crimes against Muslims -- a jump from 28 hate incidents in 2000 to 481 last year." San Francisco Chronicle (November 26, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S7068]

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CULTURE AND SOCIETY

IMMIGRANTS

Demography and the Social Contract. By Marta Tienda, Population Association of America. Prepared for the Office of Population Research Princeton University. Working Paper No. 2002-04. (The Office, Princeton, New Jersey) 2002. 55 p.; Appendices.

Full Text at: opr.princeton.edu/papers/opr0204.pdf

["The United States faces ever more formidable challenges to fulfill its commitment to the democratic values of equity and inclusion as the foreign-born share of the population increases.... A review of historical and contemporary controversies about representation of the foreign born and alien suffrage both illustrates the re-emergence of ascriptive civic hierarchies and highlights some potentially deleterious social and civic consequences of recent demographic trends."]

[Request #S7072]

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LATINOS

2002 National Survey of Latinos. By the Pew Hispanic Center and Kaiser Family Foundation. (The Center, Washington, DC) December 2002. 104 p.

Full Text at: www.pewhispanic.org/site/docs/pdf/LatinoSurveyReportFinal.pdf

["Study Shreds Assumptions: The survey shreds some of the more common assumptions about the ethnic group soon to become the nation's largest minority.... According to the study, 57 percent of Hispanics with U.S. born parents identify themselves as Americans.... An overwhelming 89 percent of Hispanics believe that those who immigrate into the U.S. must learn English.... Eighty percent believe their children will get a better education than they did, and 76 percent say the result will be better jobs that pay more money." Denver Post (December 22, 2002) E4.]

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MULTI-ETHNIC SOCIETY

Racial and Ethnic Residential Segregation in the United States: 1980-2000. By John Iceland and others. U. S. Census Bureau. (Bureau, Washington, DC) 2002. 151 p.

Full Text at: www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/censr-3.pdf

["America's metropolitan areas became more integrated during the 1990s, as renovated inner cities attracted whites and immigrants while more blacks moved to the suburbs.... A study ... determined the average white lives in a neighborhood that is 80 percent white, down from 88 percent in 1980, while the average black lives in a neighborhood that is 33 percent white, up from 30 percent." The Press Enterprise (November 28, 2002) A16.]

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DEMOGRAPHY

CENSUS

Demographic Trends in the 20th Century: Census 2000 Special Reports. By Frank Hobbs and Nicole Stoops, U.S. Census Bureau. CENSR-4. (The Bureau, Washington DC) November 2002. 222 p.; Appendices.

Full Text at: www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/censr-4.pdf

["Census Finds U.S. Is Older, More Female; Household Size Fell in 20th Century: In 1900, most of the U.S. population consisted of men, younger than 23, who mostly rented homes outside the metropolitan areas. Nearly half of them lived with five or more persons. Today most of the population is female, at least 35, who own homes, mostly in the suburbs. Most live alone or with two other persons.... The U.S. population more than tripled during the 20th century." Washington Times (December 8, 2002) A4.]

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ECONOMY

BIOINDUSTRY

California's Bioscience Industries: Overview And Policy Issues. By Daniel Pollack, California Research Bureau, California State Library. Prepared for Assemblymember Howard Wayne (CRB, Sacramento, California) October 2002. 103 p.

Full Text at: www.library.ca.gov/crb/02/15/02-015.pdf

["The bioscience industries could radically transform virtually every aspect of our lives, from medicine to human reproduction, from industrial manufacturing to the food we eat. The potential commercial applications are so extensive that state and local governments across the country are eagerly trying to cultivate these industries as engines of economic prosperity. At the same time, concerns and fears in some quarters about the biosciences have led to controversies and calls for caution. The goal of this report is to provide an overview of California’s biosciences industries, and to outline the actual and potential role of state policy with respect to these industries."]

[Request #S7073]

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DEFENSE CUTS & MILITARY BASE CLOSURES

Master Plan: Annual Update. By the Texas Strategic Military Planning Commission. (The Commission, Austin, Texas) 2002. 98 p.

Full Text at: www.tded.state.tx.us/defense/masterplan.pdf

["This report provides an overview of the role of the defense sector in Texas and future opportunities for the state to create employment based on development of new weapons systems, space initiatives and military installations that will come under review in 2005. It also touches upon what the state of Texas needs to accomplish to be competitive during the next Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) round in 2005 and lists recommendations for the state to be competitive with other states.

[Request #S7074]

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ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

The Impact of Redevelopment on the Low-Income People. By the Faculty Fellows Program, University of California, Sacramento (The Program, Sacramento) October 2002. 67 p.

Full Text at: www.csus.edu/calst/government_affairs/Reports/Impact_of_Redevelopment.pdf

["Examining activities of redevelopment agencies in Alameda, Anaheim, Banning, Oakland, Port Hueneme, and Stanislaus, the study reports that agencies have generally been successful in using Low-Mod Funds to provide affordable housing. In addition to recommending expansion of the majority of redevelopment agencies and housing activities, the study also concludes that a more stringent review of RDA revenues and expenditures and better reporting requirements are necessary to improve delivery of affordable housing to low-income people in California." California Capitol Hill Bulletin (December 18, 2002) p 3.]

[Request #S7075]

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INDUSTRY

High-Growth Industries and Highly-Educated Workers In California. By Elias Lopez, California Research Bureau, California State Library. Prepared for Assemblymember Bob Pacheco (CRB, Sacramento, California) November 2002. 55 p.

Full Text at: www.library.ca.gov/crb/02/17/02-017.pdf

["This report identifies two issues that policymakers may want to consider. One deals with the lack of adequate preparation of disadvantaged groups in California graduating from our high schools.... The other finding is that employees (and their families) in small businesses seem to be at a disadvantage, a finding that applies regardless of the educational attainment of the individual.]

[Request #S7076]

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INTERNET

Email At Work: Few Feel Overwhelmed and Most Are Pleased With The Way Email Helps Them Do Their Jobs. By Deborah Fallows, Pew Internet & American Life Project. (The Project, Washington, DC) December 8, 2002. 26 p.

Full Text at: www.pewinternet.org/reports/pdfs/PIP_Work_Email_Report.pdf

["Most American Workers Say Email Helps Them Do Their Jobs And Few Feel Overwhelmed by The Volume of Email They Handle: Research shows that email has become an integral part of 57 million Americans' work lives -- that is more than 60 percent of those employed in the United States and is almost double the number of U.S. workers who used the Internet just two years ago." AScribe Newswire (December 5, 2002) 1.]

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NOT FOR PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

"The Volunteering Decision: What Prompts It? What Sustains It?" By Paul C. Light. IN: The Brookings Review, vol. 20, no. 4 (Fall 2002) pp. 45-47.

["Volunteers want to make a difference -- make key decisions, see the effects of their work, gain valuable experience, skills or contacts.... Sample survey of 1,015 college seniors, students who volunteered and rated their experience as very positive and found their skills and talents very well used were more likely than others to consider seriously a career in the nonprofit sector."]

[Request #S7078]

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SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

Linking Effectively: Learning Lessons from Successful Collaboration in Science and Technology: Documented Briefing. By Caroline S. Wagner and others, Rand Science and Technology Policy Institute. Prepared for the Office of the Science and Technology Policy. DB-345-OSTP. (RAND, Santa Monica, California) 2002. 59 p.

Full Text at: www.rand.org/publications/DB/DB345/DB345.pdf

["This briefing describes the results of an inquiry conducted ... to provide insights into improving the efficiency and effectiveness of government sponsored international collaboration in science and technology.... Four case studies conducted for the RAND effort provide the research from which we draw lessons learned about linking effectively."]

[Request #S7079]

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SECURITIES INDUSTRY

Securities And Exchange Commission: Actions Needed To Improve Public Company Accounting Oversight Board Selection Process. By The U.S. General Accounting Office. GAO-03-339. (The Office, Washington, DC) December 2002. 36 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-03-339

["Blame All Around in Accounting Board Flop: The bungled naming of a national accounting oversight board ... involved missteps by the chairman, SEC staff and commissioners, according to a report.... The GAO spread blame widely for the debacle that led to three resignations ... gutting the federal government's market-regulation leadership.... The GAO called on the SEC to agree on a clearer process for appointing members to the accounting board, to set criteria for choosing members and to complete background checks earlier." Chicago Tribune (December 20, 2002) 3.]

[Request #S7080]

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EDUCATION

EDUCATION FINANCE

School Finance: Per-Pupil Spending Differences Between Selected Inner City and Suburban Schools Varied by Metropolitan Area. By The U. S. General Accounting Office. (The Office, Washington, DC) December 2002. 53 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-03-234

["Among the schools GAO reviewed, differences in per-pupil spending between inner city and suburban schools varied across metropolitan areas, with inner city schools spending more in some metropolitan areas and suburban schools spending more in other areas.... In general, higher per-pupil expenditures at any given school were explained primarily by higher staff salaries regardless of whether the school was an inner city or suburban school."]

[Request #S7081]

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LATINOS

"Private Schools and 'Latino Flight' From Black School Children." By Robert W. Fairlie. IN: Demography, vol. 39, no. 4 (November 2002) 655-674.

["I found a large, positive, and statistically significant coefficient on the black share of the school-age population. The coefficient estimates imply that a 10-percentage point increase in the black share increases the probability of private school attendance by 25.7% to 33.2% among Latino 8th graders and 35.2% to 52.2% among Latino 10th graders. I interpret these results as providing evidence of 'Latino flight' from public schools into private schools."]

[Request #S7082]

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NATIONAL & COMMUNITY SERVICE

"Service-Learning Sits in School." By Jim Myers. IN: Youth Today, vol. 11. no. 9 (November 2002) pp. 1+.

["A hot concept shifts away from 'community service' and even more toward classrooms.... The objective to get teens to volunteer in community-based organizations has been largely replaced by projects that come under the school curriculum. In Maryland, like much of the country, the youth 'community service' movement has been eclipsed by 'service-learning.' As the service learning phenomenon spreads nationwide, these shifts in Maryland ... raise fundamental questions about what service-learning is and what it achieves."]

[Request #S7083]

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TEACHER DEVELOPMENT

Moving Past the Politics: How Alternative Certification Can Promote Comprehensive Teacher Development Reforms. By Virginia Roach and Benjamin A. Cohen, National Association of State Boards of Education. (The Association, Alexandria, Virginia) 2002. 33 p.

Full Text at: www.nasbe.org/alt_cert_report.pdf

["In this Issue Brief we take the viewpoint that quality alternative certification programs offer a way to develop a broader pool of prospective teachers while also helping states address concerns about teacher development, professionalism, and retention."]

[Request #S7084]

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EMPLOYMENT

DISABLED WORKERS

Business Tax Incentives: Incentives to Employ Workers with Disabilities Receive Limited Use and Have an Uncertain Impact. By United States General Accounting Office. (The Office, Washington, DC) December 2002. 49 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-03-39

["More than 17 million working-age individuals have a self-reported disability that limits work. Their unemployment rate is also twice as high as for those without a work disability.... This report provides information on the current usage of the tax incentives; the incentives' ability to encourage the hiring and retention of workers with disabilities, and options to enhance awareness and usage of the incentives."]

[Request #S7085]

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EMPLOYMENT SERVICE PROGRAMS

Human Capital: Effective Use of Flexibilities Can Assist Agencies in Managing Their Workforces. By The U.S. General Accounting Office. (The Office, Washington, DC) December 2002. 62 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-03-2

["An essential element to acquiring, developing and retaining high-quality federal employees is agencies' effective use of human capital flexibilities. These flexibilities represent the policies and practices that an agency has the authority to implement in managing its workforce."]

[Request #S7086]

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ENERGY

ELECTRICITY INDUSTRY

Gone With The Wind: How California is Losing its Clean Power Edge to... Texas??! By Peter Asmus, Pathfinder Communications. Prepared for The Energy Foundation and the Hewlett Foundation (The Energy Foundation, San Francisco, California) 2002. 26 p.

Full Text at: www.ef.org/documents/gonewind.pdf

["California, once a world leader on renewable energy, has seen its lead slowly disappear through years of neglect, bureaucratic infighting, political posturing, as well as misguided policies.... A Renewable Portfolio Standard may offer part of the solution to the price volatility, environmental impacts and economic drain of the state's current substantial commitment to traditional fossil fuel technologies."]

[Request #S7087]

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UTILITIES

Natural Gas: Analysis Of Changes In Market Price. By The U.S. General Accounting Office. GAO-03-46. (The Office, Washington, DC) December 2002. 96 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-03-46

["The GAO said in a report that there were 'some indications' that natural gas prices may have been manipulated on the West Coast in the winter of 2000-01. The GAO said that until various federal investigations were complete 'it is not possible to definitely establish whether and how much [energy] prices paid by consumers were affected.'" Los Angeles Times (December 20, 2002) 10.]

[Request #S7088]

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The Public Benefit of Energy Efficiency to the State of Minnesota. By Mark Bernstein and others, Rand Science and Technology. Prepared for the Energy Foundation. MR-1587.(Rand, Santa Monica, California) 2002. 51 p.

Full Text at: www.rand.org/publications/MR/MR1587/MR1587.pdf

["This report assesses the benefits of energy efficiency to the Minnesota state economy, its environment, and its citizens.... This analysis estimates energy efficiency through its effect on energy consumption and economic productivity ... while controlling for price, sectoral composition, and other factors."]

[Request #S7089]

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Municipal Power Struggle; Electricity Consultants Are Telling Cities that They Can Break Free of the Big Utilities, Which Are Fighting Back. By Nancy Rivera Brooks. IN: Los Angeles Times (December 27, 2002) pp C1+.

["In classic calamity-breeds-opportunity fashion, EES Consulting and a small group of other firms have turned the wreckage of California's ill-fated energy deregulation experiment into something of a cottage industry, peddling their expertise to communities that might want to break free of the large investor-owned utilities that have always brought them electricity.... Edison and other utilities are fighting back. They say EES exaggerates the benefit -- and low-balls the cost -- of starting up a municipal utility."]

[Request #S7090]

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ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES

ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT

Report Analysis and Information on Four U.S./Canadian Transboundary Species Listed as Threatened or Endangered in the United States. By The U. S. General Accounting Office. (The Office, Washington, DC) October 2002. 50 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-03-211R

["The United States and Canada similarly engage in processes -- both on their respective side of the border and in collaboration with one another -- aimed at protecting, monitoring, and facilitating the eventual recovery of the bull trout, grizzly bear, marbled murrelet, and woodland caribou."]

[Request #S7091]

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ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATION

Risk Regulation at Risk: Restoring a Pragmatic Approach. By Sidney Shapiro and Robert L. Glicksman, Stanford Law and Politics. (Stanford University Press, Stanford, California) 2002. 271 p.; Appendices.

["This book responds to the vacuum we perceive: is there a common basis or set of ideas that can explain, clarify, and provide a basis for analyzing risk regulation? ... Our claim is that the structure of risk regulation is consistent with pragmatic principles, and that pragmatism is an appropriate baseline from which to design and implement risk regulation." NOTE: Risk Regulation ... is available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S7092]

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FLOODPLAINS

California Floodplain Management Report: Recommendations. By The California Floodplain Management Task Force. (The Task Force, Sacramento, California) December 2002. 88 p.

Full Text at: fpmtaskforce.water.ca.gov/forms/FPMTGReport121602.pdf

["According to a state panel, California's new growth, covering thousands more acres with impenetrable hard surfaces, is spreading flood risks to new areas and among people who live with a false sense of security.... Meeting over the last six months, the task force issued a total of 38 proposals in its report." Contra Costa Times (December 22, 2002).]

[Request #S7093]

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WETLANDS

National Wetlands Mitigation Action Plan. By G. Tracy Mehan, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and others (The Agency, Washington, DC)) December 24, 2002. 17 p.

Full Text at: www.epa.gov/owow/wetlands/NWMAP122402signed.pdf

["Administration officials promise the new policy will mean 'no net loss' of wetlands. Under the revised plan, wetlands lost during construction of roads, buildings or other projects will be replaced with newly created or restored wetlands.... The first stage in a multi-year, multi-agency strategy takes effect when the Army Corps of Engineers issues its revision of a much-criticized guidance letter that specifies what kind of mitigation Corps engineers can permit to make up for wetlands lost to development." San Francisco Chronicle (December 27, 2002) A1.]

[Request #S7094]

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GENERAL GOVERNMENT

ELECTION REFORM

"California's Long Road to Election Reform." By Bill Jones, California Secretary of State. IN: Election Law Journal, vol. 1, no. 4 (2002) pp. 505-508.

["In California, we are in the midst of what has been a nearly decade-long program to reform one of the world's most complex and diverse election systems.... The ... restructure, reform, and rebuilding of our election processes must be completely devoid of political debate and must focus solely on logic, common sense, and a review of best practices around the globe."]

[Request #S7095]

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FEDERAL GRANTS

California's Share of Federal Formula Grants: 1991-2001. By Tim Ransdell, California Institute for Federal Policy Research. Formula Grants and California Series. (The Institute, Washington, DC) December 11, 2002. 54 p.

Full Text at: www.ppic.org/publications/PPIC165/ppic165report3.pdf

["The significance of formula program expenditures in the federal budget has risen steadily over the past decade.... When combined, direct payments and formula grant categories rose from about half of federal spending in 1991 to more than two-thirds in 2001."]

[Request #S7096]

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Factors Determining California's Share of Federal Formula Grants. By Tim Ransdell, California Institute for Federal Policy Research. Formula Grants and California Series. (The Institute, Washington, DC) December 11, 2002. 22 p.

Full Text at: www.ppic.org/publications/PPIC165/ppic165report1.pdfFederal

["In fiscal year 2001, the federal government distributed $284 billion through 158 formula grant programs; California received $34 billion for roughly 12 percent of those funds.... This report describes the major factors used by federal formula grant programs to allocate funds and describes how California's share of programs varies by the factors employed."]

[Request #S7097]

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GOVERNOR

A California Worth Fighting For: Second Inaugural Address. By Gray Davis, Governor of the State of California. (Office of the Governor, Sacramento, California) January 6, 2003. 4 p.

["Davis ... spent much of his 20-minute inaugural address talking about the problems the state has overcome and emphasizing its ability to move forward.... Davis said part of his plan includes 'Build California Teams,' which will accelerate the use of $20 billion in bonds approved by voters for school construction, housing and park and water projects." San Francisco Chronicle (January 7, 2003) A1.

[Request #S7110]

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STATE OF THE STATE

State of the State Address. By California Governor Gray Davis. (The Office of the Governor, Sacramento, California) January 8, 2001. 3 p.

["Davis Promises to Revive Economy: In his fifth State of the State address, (Governor Gray) Davis evoked the enduring spirit of Californians who struggled through far greater trials during the Great Depression and World War II as inspiration for state leaders facing the economic crisis.... Davis asked legislators to give him the power that California governors had until 1983 to make budget cuts in the middle of the fiscal year when times are tough." San Jose Mercury News (January 9, 2002) A1.]

[Request #S7098]

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STATE REVENUES

"Are State and Local Revenue Systems Becoming Obsolete?" By Robert Tannenwald. IN: National Tax Journal, vol. 55, no. 3 (September 2002) 467-489.

["This paper discusses the impact on state and local revenues of four factors: The shift in the nations' mix of production and consumption from goods to services; The growing importance of intangible assets in generating output; The proliferation of electronic commerce; [and] The intensification of interjurisdictional competition."]

[Request #S7100]

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"State Corporate Tax Revenue Trends: Causes and Possible Solutions." By William F. Fox and LeAnn Luna. IN: National Tax Journal, vol. 55, no. 3 (September 2002) pp. 491-508.

["This paper is divided into three sections: A detailed examination of the trends in state corporate income tax revenues over the past three decades; A description of the underlying causes of the decline in corporate tax revenues; [and] A review of alternate means of slowing or ending the decline in corporate tax revenues."]

[Request #S7101]

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STATE TAXES

"Evaluating Internet Sales Tax Proposals." By Matthew Graham. IN: State Tax Notes, vol. 25, no. 10 (September 2, 2002) pp. 721-729.

["This report focuses on use tax collection for tangible goods sold over the Internet by vendors who do not have a physical presence in the taxing state.... Different types of proposals try to reach an acceptable solution to the issue.... This report seeks to identify these policy objectives and examine the proposed solutions to see how they further or hinder the recognized policies."]

[Request #S7102]

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HEALTH

ANTIBIOTICS

Poultry on Antibiotics: Hazards to Human Health. By David Wallinga, and others. (Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy, Minneapolis, Minnesota)) December 2002. And Of Birds and Bacteria. By Consumer Reports. (Consumers Union, Yonkers, New York) January 2003.

["Three times more antibiotics by weight are fed to poultry in the United States than humans consume, and the poultry industry's use of antibiotics is a health risk to American turkey and chicken eaters, according to two independent studies.... 'Common, brand name poultry products routinely carry at least one disease-causing germ if not more, and these bacteria are often resistant to one or more antibiotics. The resistance we found is for many of the same medicines that doctors rely on for treating people sick with infections,' Dr. Wallinga said." Environmental News Service (December 10, 2002) 1.]

Poultry on Antibiotics. 24 p.
http://www.iatp.org/foodandhealth/library/admin/uploadedfiles/Poultry_on_Antibiotics_Hazards_to_Human_Health.pdf

Of Birds and Bacteria. 3 p.
consumer reports

[Request #S7103]

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DYING

Means to a Better End: A Report on Dying in America Today. By Last Acts. (Last Acts, Washington, DC) 2002. 108 p.

Full Text at: http://www.lastacts.org/files/misc/meansfull.pdf

["Study Says Many Terminally Ill Denied 'Good Death': The nation's first state-by-state report on the inadequate care at the end of life was hailed as a 'wake-up call.' . California was graded as providing 'average to poor' care for its terminally ill residents." Sacramento Bee (November 19, 2002) A15.]

[Request #S7105]

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HEALTH CARE

A Commitment to Caring: The Role of Catholic Hospitals in the Health Care Safety Net. By The Catholic Health Association of the United States. (The Association, Saint Louis, Missouri) 2002. 24 p.

Full Text at: www.chausa.org/Publicpo/SAFETYNETSTUDY.ASP

[“Future public policy initiatives to strengthen the nation’s health care safety net should recognize the contributions and special mission of many Catholic hospitals in serving the uninsured and underserved communities, according to a report…. In addition [the report] called on Congress to take steps to strengthen sources of existing funding that safety net providers rely on heavily. The association called on federal lawmakers to reverse Medicaid disproportionate share hospital cuts, temporarily increase federal payments to state Medicaid plans, and expand Medicaid and State Children’s Health Insurance Program coverage.” BNA’s Health Care Policy Report (November 25, 2002) 1554 p.]

[Request #S7106]

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MEDI-CAL

Department of Health Services: It Needs to Better Control the Pricing of Durable Medical Equipment and Medical Supplies and More Carefully Consider Its Plans to Reduce Expenditures on These Items. By the California State Auditor, Bureau of State Audits. 2002-109. (The Bureau, Sacramento, California) December 2002. 56 p.

Full Text at: www.bsa.ca.gov/bsa/pdfs/2002109.pdf

["Medi-Cal Overpaid Millions, Audit Says: The Department of Health Services failed to make sure it was not being overcharged for medical equipment and supplies under Medi-Cal, the state's public insurance plan for low-income residents.... More than $356 million in state and federal money was spent on medical equipment, supplies and hearing aids for Medi-Cal patients in 2001, according to the audit." Associated Press (December 13, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S7108]

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HOUSING

AFFORDABLE HOUSING

Affordable Housing: Issues and Trends. By Cathy Atkins, National Conference of State Legislatures. State Legislative Report. Vol. 27, No. 18. (NCSL, Denver, Colorado) November 2002. 6 p.

Full Text at: www.ncsl.org/legis/slrs/affordablehousing.PDF

["States have taken various approaches to housing issues, including: Including affordable housing strategies in their comprehensive housing strategies; Issuing bonds to assist low- and moderate-income individuals purchase housing; [and] Giving incentives to nonprofit organizations that provide housing for low-income individuals and families. This report highlights some trends that are occurring as states endeavor to ensure that affordable housing is available to residents."]

[Request #S7109]

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HUMAN SERVICES

ADOPTION

Adoption Review: Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services. By The Department of Auditor-Controller (The Department, Los Angeles, California) November 2002. 29 p.

Full Text at: auditor.co.la.ca.us/Children%20and%20Family%20Services%20-%20Adoption/2002_11_25%20DCFS%20Adoptions%20Review.pdf

["The purpose of the operational review was to identify opportunities to modify policies and procedures to significantly streamline the adoptions process.... Our review disclosed a number of inefficient operating practices and a generally lengthy process cycle to complete adoptions.... Reengineering adoptions case-handling practices as discussed in this report should significantly improve the efficiency of the overall adoptions processing activities."]

[Request #S7111]

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CHILD SUPPORT

Child Support Enforcement Program: The Procurement of a Single, Statewide Automated Child Support System is Taking Longer Than Initially Estimated, With Several Challenges Remaining. By the Bureau of State Audits, California State Auditor. (The Bureau, Sacramento, California) December 2002. 30 p.

Full Text at: www.bsa.ca.gov/bsa/pdfs/990281.pdf

["The report describes the progress made during the past 2 years toward procuring a single, statewide automated child support system. The proposal included a total system cost estimate of over $1.3 billion covering 10 years. Following an example from a previous state procurement where only a single proposal was received, the project team hired a consultant to examine the reasonableness of the cost, the results of which are still confidential."]

[Request #S7112]

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HOMELESS

A Status Report on Hunger and Homelessness in America’s Cities, 2002: A 25-City Survey. By The U. S. Conference of Mayors. (The Conference, Washington, DC) December 2002. 141 p.

Full Text at: usmayors.org/uscm/hungersurvey/2002/onlinereport/HungerAndHomelessReport2002.pdf

[“Rising housing costs and a sluggish economy contributed to an average 19 percent increase in hunger and homelessness in selected U.S. cities in 2002, according to a survey…. [The survey] found an increase in the number of emergency food requests in each of the 25 cities surveyed. And 22 of the cities reported increases in the need for emergency shelter.”]

[Request #S7113]

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TEMPORARY ASSISTANCE FOR NEEDY FAMILIES

TANF and Welfare Programs. By Tim Ransdell and Shervin Boloorian, California Institute for Federal Policy Research. Formula Grants and California Series. (The Institute, Washington, DC) December 11, 2002. 78 p.

Full Text at: www.ppic.org/publications/PPIC165/ppic165report3.pdf

["In a sharp reversal from record-high recipient counts immediately before PRWORA's implementation, states on average reduced caseloads by 40 percent between 1996 and 2001. Child poverty rates simultaneously declined by 4 percentage points to their lowest level in 20 years. Some critics view these statistics with skepticism, doubting the adequacy of indicators to assess recipients' quality of life after moving off cash assistance and worrying that an inadequate cushion will leave governments unable to provide sufficient assistance in the event of a severe economic downturn."]

[Request #S7114]

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WELFARE

Forty Hour Work Rule: Implications for Families and Children. By Sheila Zedlewski, The Urban Institute. (The Institute, Washington, DC) December 2002. 7 p.

Full Text at: www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/900573.pdf

["Analysis of existing data on welfare recipients suggests that the proposal to increase work requirements may be very difficult for both states and TANF recipients to achieve. There are a number of reasons why work participation rates are not higher: 1) There is a lack of jobs for those with little education; 2) Welfare recipients face barriers to employment that need to be resolved; 3) Welfare recipients need better access to child care, especially for infants."]

[Request #S7115]

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Domestic Violence and Welfare Policy: Research Findings That Can Inform Policies on Marriage and Child Well-Being. By Sharmila Lawrence, National Center for Children in Poverty. (The Center, New York, New York) December 2002. 12 p.

Full Text at: www.researchforum.org/newsletter/DomVio.pdf

["This report examines research on prevalence and correlates of domestic violence among women on welfare; effects of domestic violence on child well-being; and marriage and domestic violence." Moving Ideas News (December 12, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S7116]

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TRANSPORTATION

AUTOMOBILE SAFETY

Cell Phones and Driving. By House Research Department, Minnesota House of Representatives. Information Brief. (The Department, Minneapolis, Minnesota) 2002. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.house.leg.state.mn.us/hrd/pubs/cellphdrvg.pdf

["The rapid expansion in the use of cell phones and other mobile technology has led to concerns that their use in motor vehicles constitutes a growing highway safety threat. This information brief looks at issues surrounding this 21st century controversy and three ways of addressing them -- public education, technological improvements, and legislation."]

[Request #S7104]

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Reducing Casualties and Costs: State Legislative Progress in Improving Traffic Safety, 2002. By Melissa A. Savage and others, National Conference of State Legislatures. NCSL Transportation Series. No. 17. (NCSL, Denver, Colorado) December 2002. 76 p.; Appendices.

["This report summarizes hundreds of bills regarding traffic safety issues considered by state legislatures during the 2002 legislative sessions. The purpose of this report is to provide information about current traffic safety issues to legislatures, federal officials and other interested parties."]

[Request #S7117]

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CALIFORNIA

Department of Transportation: Its Seismic Retrofit Expenditures Comply With The Bond Act, And It Has Continued To Reimburse The Interim Funding For Fiscal Years 1994-95 and 1995-96. By Bureau of State Audits, California State Auditor. (The Bureau, Sacramento, California) December 2002. 25 p.

Full Text at: www.bsa.ca.gov/bsa/pdfs/2002010.pdf

["The Bureau of State Audits presents its audit report concerning the Department of Transportation's revenues and expenditures authorized by the Seismic Retrofit Bond Act of 1996. This report concludes that the department has ensured that seismic retrofit projects funded with bond proceeds are consistent with the purpose of the Bond Act."]

[Request #S7119]

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HIGHWAYS

FY 2003 Highway Apportionments. By Federal Funds Information for States. FFIS Issue Brief, 02-62. (FFIS, Washington, DC) December 3, 2002. 6 p.

["The federal-aid highway program has a number of apportioned programs, each of which has separate funding and allocation mechanisms. These apportionments were established in TEA-21 through FY 2003 and are independent of the annual budget and appropriation processes."]

[Request #S7107]

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WASHINGTON READER

California Capitol Hill Bulletin. By the California Institute for Federal Policy Research. Vol. 9, Bulletin 32 (The Institute, Washington, DC) December 18, 2002. 6 p.

Full Text at: www.calinst.org/bulletins/bull932.pdf

[Includes: "U.S. Opens Roads to Mexican Trucks;" "9th Circuit Upholds Ban on Oil and Gas Exploration Off CA Coast;" "State Seeks Federal Aid To Alleviate Ailing Health System;" "U.S. Announces Trade Agreements with Chile and Singapore;" "FERC Judge finds California Overcharged By $1.8 Billion for Power;" "Census to Release Statistically Adjusted Data;" and others.]

[Request #S7121]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

HEALTH

AUTISM

"A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Porcine Versus Synthetic Secretin for Reducing Symptoms of Autism." By Alan S. Unis and others. IN: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, vol. 41, no. 11 (November 2002) pp. 1315-1323.

["The latest study on secretin, touted a few years ago as a possible cure for autism, had failed to show that the digestive hormone has any significant impact on the disorder. The new study ... is another setback for parents whose hopes were raised by a 1998 study reporting marked improvement in the behavior of three young boys with autism after they received a slow injection of secretin as part of a diagnostic procedure for digestive problems." San Francisco Chronicle (December 12, 2002) F8.]

[Request #S7118]

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HEALTH CARE

Who Will Keep the Public Healthy? Educating Public Health Professionals for the 21st Century. By Kristine Gebbie and others. (National Academy Press, Washington, DC) 2002. 281 p.

Full Text at: stills.nap.edu/books/030908542X/html/

["Public health professionals should receive more training and education that emphasizes the relationships among multiple determinants affecting health.... Public health professionals must be trained to understand and apply new advances in science, information, and computer science technology to public health practice and learning. They also must be able to communicate effectively with multiple audiences and be able to incorporate the needs of culturally diverse groups in public health interventions and research." BNA's Health Care Policy Report (November 11, 2002) 1490. NOTE: Who Will Keep ... will be available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S7120]

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HOUSING

COMMUNITY PLANNNING

Place Making: Developing Town Centers, Main Street and Urban Villages. By Charles Bohl. (Urban Land Institute, Washington, D.C.) 2002. 305 p.

["One of the hottest trends in real estate is the development of town centers and urban villages that include a mix of uses in a pedestrian friendly setting. This book ... [describes] the economic and social forces driving this trend; how these projects are being developed in master planned communities, infill, and redevelopment areas; special regulatory, market and finance issues; and how suburban planners and developers are pursuing town center concepts.... The book includes case studies and examples." NOTE: Place Making ... will be available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S7122]

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