Subject: Studies in the News 02-64 (October 25, 2002)


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News


California -- One Hundred and Fifty Years Ago

October 20, 1852 - "The third Jenny Lind Theatre, opened by Tom Maguire on October 4, 1851 on the same site as the two preceding it, which were destroyed in the fires of 1851, was purchased by the City of San Francisco in 1852 for use as the city hall. (Jenny Lind was the Swedish soprano whose purity of voice and natural singing style earned her the nickname the Swedish nightingale.)"  ceres.ca.gov/geo_area/counties/San_Francisco/landm  

1852 - "The Boards of Commissioners of Common Schools of the several towns, cities and villages, shall have power, and it shall be their duty, within their respective jurisdictions; To employ and fix the salaries and terms of service of the Common School Teachers; To suspend or expel from any such Common School, with the advice of the Teacher, any pupil who will not submit to the reasonable and ordinary rules of order and discipline therein. The Common School year shall commence on the first day of November, and end on the last day of October."  California State Education Code 1852, ch. 53,  

Contents This Week

Introductory Material CALIFORNIA READER
   California ranked most favorable state
CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT
   Racial profiling by police
   Parolees returning to prison
   Terrorist attack preparation
   Judge overturns three-strikes case
   Improving juvenile justice for females
CULTURE AND SOCIETY
   Residential segregation and diversity
ECONOMY
   Economic climate
   Economic security and opportunity
EDUCATION
   Majority of public schools meet state goals
   Court upholds repeal of bilingual education
   Universal preschool framework
   Corporate branding of America's schools
   School district turnaround
   School vouchers
   Teacher union monopoly
   Alternative credentials for teachers
ENERGY
   Reducing California's oil dependence
   Enron's record in California
ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES
   Fiscal analysis of California's natural resource programs
   State of the nation's ecosystems
   Development threatens farmland
   Five most polluted parks
   Pesticide use declined in 2001
   Water infrastructure
   EPA water quality and infrastructure assessment
   San Francisco turns profit on electricity
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
   State spending in the 1990s
   Uniform voting machines
   Strategy to secure cyberspace
   Spheres of influence for cities
   Ballot initiatives in the 2002 election
   Homeland security survey
   Gaping budget deficits
   Capturing the Latino vote
HEALTH
   Children with autism increasing in California
   Treatments for breast cancer
   Breast cancer screening and detection
   HMO annual report card
   Trends in obesity among US adults
   Telephone hotline to stop smoking
HOUSING
   Home ownership gap widens
   Mortgage study on racial disparity
HUMAN SERVICES
   Report card on children in California
   Religiosity and teens
   States promote marriage
   Funding provided to promote adoption
   HHS awards millions in bonuses
INTERNATIONAL READER
   Border management policies
   US cotton subsidies and Africa
   World summit on sustainable development
TRANSPORTATION
   Fewer teens in crashes
   Highway infrastructure problems
   Sacramento metropolitan transportation plan
   Transportation plan for Southern California
WASHINGTON READER
   California Institute's briefing on federal issues
STUDIES TO COME
   Light shed on Latino health
   Affordable housing crisis
   Rental housing and America's poor
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News is a very current compilation of items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau to supplement the public policy debate in California’s Capitol. To help share the latest information with state policymakers, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library’s website. This week's list of current articles in various public policy areas is presented below.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • Items in the State Library collection can be checked out to state officials and staff.

  • Access to all materials listed will be provided by the State Information Reference Center, either by e-mail to cslsirc@library.ca.gov or by calling 654-0261.

The following studies are currently on hand:

CALIFORNIA READER

CALIFORNIA READER

California Overtakes Florida as the State Where Most People Would Like to Live. By Humphrey Taylor, The Harris Poll. (The Poll, Rochestet, New York) September 2002. Various Pagings.

Full Text at: www.harrisinteractive.com/harris_poll/index.asp?PID=327

["According to a newly released Harris Interactive survey, California is now the state where Americans would most like to live, unseating Florida, which had been No. 1 since 1997.... In reality, more people move out of California than enter it. Rather, it is a measure of the enduring California mystique ­ that even after a dotcom depression, statewide blackouts, and billion-dollar deficits, it is still seen as the most alluring state in the union." The Christian Science Monitor (September 27, 2002) 1.]

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CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT

LAW ENFORCEMENT

A Department in Denial: The San Francisco Polic Department Failure to Address Racial Profiling. By Mark Schlosberg. American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California. (The Union, San Francisco, California) October 7, 2002. 20 p.

Full Text at: www.aclunc.org/police/021007-report.pdf

["San Francisco police are doing little to deal with the significant problem of racial profiling in their traffic stops and searches.... Using a year's worth of SFPD reports of traffic stops ... [the study] found that black motorists were being targeted far beyond their numbers in the city population and that both black and Latinos were searched far more frequently after being stopped than white drivers." San Francisco Chronicle (October 8, 2002) A19.]

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PRISONERS & PAROLEES

"California's Parole Experiment." By Jeremy Travis and Sarah Lawrence, Justice Policy Center, Urban Institute, IN: California Journal, vol. 33, no. 8 (August 2002) pp. 18-23.

["Studies from the center have tracked America's dramatic crackdown on criminals in recent years. But California has exceeded the national trends and is remarkably unique in its approach to those newly released from prison.... As a result, California is now the national leader in returning parolees to prison and its return rate has increased 30 times between 1980 and 2000."]

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TERRORISM

Federal Funding for Homeland Security. By Federal Funds Information for States. FFIS Issue Brief, 02-54. (FFIS, Washington, DC) October 9, 2002. 6. p; Tables.

["These programs are designed to help state and local governments purchase equipment and provide training they will need if a terrorist attack occurs....FY 2002 also saw the creation of another new program, this one administered by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA).... Allocated $125 million to states for use by regional hospitals for planning and preparedness."]

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THREE-STRIKES LAW

Duran v. Castro. U.S. District Court, Eastern District of California. S-00-305 LKK/JFM. October 18, 2002. 28 p.

Full Text at: 207.41.18.73/caed/DOCUMENTS/Opinions/Karlton/duran.pdf

["In an analysis that goes well beyond earlier court opinions on California's 'three-strikes' law, a federal judge has tossed out the 25-years-to-life sentence of a Sacramento man.... Repeat offenses may be taken into consideration 'only to the extent that it serves to aggravate the principal offense,' Karlton said in a 28-page order that he designated for publication, indicating the judge feels he is breaking new legal ground." Sacramento Bee (October 22, 2002) B1.]

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WOMEN

"Improving Juvenile Justice for Females: A Statewide Assessment in California." By Barbara Bloom and others. IN: Crime & Delinquency, vol. 48, no. 4 (October 2002) pp. 526-552.

["This article reports findings from a survey of officials from various California state agencies and a series of interviews and focus groups with female youth and professionals serving this population.... The findings were used to make gender-specific policy and program recommendations.... A theoretical approach to treatment that is gender-sensitive and that addresses the realities of girls' lives must be developed."]

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CULTURE AND SOCIETY

INTEGRATION

"Who's Your Neighbor? Residential Segregation and Diversity in California." By Juan Onesimo and others. IN: California Counts Population Trends and Profiles, vol. 4, no. 1 (August 2002) pp. 1-20.

Full Text at: www.ppic.org/publications/CalCounts13/calcounts13.pdf

["During the 1990's, California's population became more racially and ethnically diverse. By 2000, no single racial or ethnic group constituted a majority of the state's population.... Segregation in all neighborhood types declined between 1990 and 2000."]

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ECONOMY

BUSINESS CLIMATE

Winning Strategies in the Economic Development Marketing Game: A View from Corporate America: Final Report. Third Edition. By Development Counsellors International. (The Councellors, New York, New York) September 2002. 52 p.

Full Text at: www.dc-intl.com/winningstrategies/DCIs_Winning_Strategies_2002.pdf

["If You Build a Bad Economic Climate. They Won't Come: Our state has the worst business climate in the nation, according to a new report. DCI interviewed 287 executives from companies with $100 million or more in sales.... [They] were asked to name the three states with the worst economic climates. A stunning 57 percent chose California, followed by 36 percent for New York and 18 percent for Massachusetts." Orange County Register (September 25, 2002) 1.]

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ECONOMIC POLICY

The Asset Index: Assessing the Progress of States in Promoting Economic Security and Opportunity. By the Asset Development Institute, Brandeis University. (The Institute, Waltham, Massachussetts) September 2002. 146 p.

Full Text at: www.centeronhunger.org/pdf/ASSETINDEX.pdf

["This report presents a state-by-state comparative study of key assets that all Americans need to succeed in today's economy.... The study finds dramatic differences among states. Three states rank among the top 10 for over half of the indicators and not at all among the bottom ten. Conversely, two states rank among the bottom 10 for over half of the indicators and never among the top 10."]

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EDUCATION

ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE

Superintendent Eastin Reports Most Schools Demonstrated Academic Growth in 2001-02 School Year: Press Release. And Explanatory Notes for the 2002-2002 Academic Report Performance Index Growth Report. By The California Department of Education. (The Department, Sacramento, California) 2002. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.cde.ca.gov/news/releases2002/rel32.asp

["The Academic Performance Index (API), begun three years ago, shows how well schools are working based on state test scores.... This year of more than 6,400 schools, 53 percent met specific targets, while 70 percent made more modest improvements.... Every year, schools try to increase their points by 5 percent of the difference between their spot on the scale and 800.]

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BILINGUAL EDUCATION

Valeria v. Davis. U.S. Court of Appeals, Ninth Circuit. 01-15219. October 7, 2002. Various pagings.

["A federal appeals court upheld California's 1998 repeal of bilingual education, saying the voter-approved measure was motivated by education, not racism. The initiative, Proposition 227, overturned 30 years of policies that allowed bilingual instruction and required all public school classes to be taught 'overwhelmingly' in English." San Francisco Chronicle (October 8, 2002) A18.]

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EARLY EDUCATION

Universal Access to Preschool Including Early Care and Education Plan Framework. By the Los Angeles County Children and Families First - Proposition 10 Commission. (The Commission, Los Angeles, California) September 6, 2002. 17 p.

Full Text at: www.prop10.org/cdi/9-6-02/Concept%20Paper.pdf

["The Los Angeles County Children and Families First Commission voted in early August to provide universal, full-day prekindergarten to Los Angeles families, regardless of income.... The program will initially target children in neighborhoods with low-performing schools, but advocates hope to eventually expand the program to serve children from birth to age five throughout the county. Backers of the plan aim to enroll at least 70 percent of Los Angeles County's 300,000 3- and 4-year olds in the voluntary program." Children's Defense Funds CDF Child Care Advocacy Newsletter (September 23, 2002).]

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SCHOOL FINANCE

What's in a Name? The Corporate Branding of America's Schools; The Fifth Annual Report on Trends in Schoolhouse Commercialism. By Alex Molnar, Education Policies Studies Laboratory, Arizona State University. (The University, Tempe, Arizona) September 2002. 40 p.

Full Text at: www.asu.edu/educ/epsl/CERU/Annual%20reports/EPSL-0209-103-CERU.pdf

["This report addresses the question of private and corporate sponsorship of public education and education-related activities ... the practice of selling naming rights to various school athletic facilities, exclusive product agreements, corporate-sponsored incentive programs, and the corporate appropriation of public school space for their brand names or logos. The report also notes that in recent years, several school boards have limited opportunities for commercial activity and marketing in their schools." The University of Wisconsin's Internet Scout Report (October 11, 2002).]

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SCHOOL REFORM

Foundations for Success: Case Studies of How Urban School Systems Improve Student Achievement. By Jason Snipes, Manpower Development Research Corporation. Prepared for the Council of Great City Schools. (The Council, Washington, DC) September 2002. 234 p.

Full Text at: www.cgcs.org/pdfs/Foundations.pdf

["Sacramento City District Turnaround Cited in U.S. Study: The school district was cited in a study for overcoming political infighting and organizational problems to reverse declining achievement among its 58,000 students.... Researchers ... identified Sacramento as one of the three school districts that had improved reading and math scores for three consecutive years, at rates higher than the state's average, while narrowing racially identifiable achievement gaps." Sacramento Bee (September 6, 2002).]

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SCHOOL VOUCHERS

School Vouchers: Characteristics of Privately Funded Programs. By The U.S. General Accounting Office GAO-02-752(The Office, Washington, DC) September 2002. 43 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-02-752

["Privately funded voucher programs are no guarantee that students who leave public school for private school will do better than the classmates they leave behind, although parents of voucher students think the new schools are safer, a congressional report says." San Diego Union-Tribune (September 27,2002)]

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TEACHERS

Liberating Teachers Toward Market Competition in Teacher Representation. By Myron Lieberman, Education Policy Institute, Cato Institute. Policy Analysis no. 450. (The Institute, Washington, DC) August 28, 2002. 24 p.

Full Text at: www.cato.org/pubs/pas/pa450.pdf

["Break Teacher Union Monopoly, Says Report: Introducing market competition into teacher representation would 'lower teacher dues, give better service, and offer increased choice (including school vouchers and charter schools) and more input in the key decisions affecting their employment,' said Myron Lieberman, author of the report." United Press International (September 10, 2002) 1.]

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Who is Teaching California's Children? By Camille E. Esch and Patrick M. Shields. The Center for the Future of Teaching and Learning. (The Center, Santa Cruz, California) 2002. 20 p.

Full Text at: www.cftl.org/documents/WhoisTeachingCAChildren.pdf

["According to the report of 40,000 California teachers without credentials who go through the alternative route, only about 5,000 -- or roughly 12 percent -- have masters' or doctoral degrees. About 40 percent of the 278,000 fully credentialed teachers hold advanced degrees.... Schools with more low achieving, poor and minority students are much more likely to have a higher percentage of teachers without credentials." Sacramento Bee (October 8, 2002) A3.]

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ENERGY

Fueling the Future: A Plan to Reduce California's Oil Dependence. By Roland Hwang and others. National Resource Council. (The Council, Washington, DC) September 2002. 58 p.

Full Text at: www.nrdc.org/air/transportation/calfuel/calfuel.pdf

[“California faces an increasing shortfall of gasoline during the next two decades that will lead to higher prices at the pump, according to a report…. The demand for gasoline far outstrips local supply, creating an unhealthy market that is overly dependent on import and therefore vulnerable to disruptions…. California currently imports 30,000 barrels of gasoline daily…. That will jump to 80,000 barels per day when the state phases out the gasoline additive MTBE in 2003….” San Francisco Chronicle (September 27, 2002) B1.]

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ELECTRICITY INDUSTRY

Did Enron Pillage Californina? By Jerry Taylor and Peter VanDoren, The Cato Institute. Briefing Paper no. 72 (The Institute, Washington, DC) August 22, 2002. 7 p.

Full Text at: www.cato.org/pubs/briefs/bp72.pdf

["Revelations ... about Enron Energy Services’ byzantine electricity-trading practices have fueled charges that merchant power producers and traders artificially engineered the California electricity crisis of 2000–01. A careful examination of the suspect trading practices, however, reveals that there’s less to those charges than meets the eye."]

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ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES

CALIFORNIA

California's Natural Resource Programs: Where Does the Money Come from and Where Does It Go? By J. Fred Silva, Public Policy Institue of California (The Institute, San Francisco, California) August 2002. 23 p.

Full Text at: www.ppic.org/publications/PPICEO5/PPICEO5.pdf

["This report analyzes natural resource priorities by reviewing program expenditures and revenues between fiscal years 1978-79 and 2000-01. It seeks to answer three questions: How much money has the state spent on natural resource activities; what are the spending priorities for natural resource activities; which funding sources are used to finance these activities?"]

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ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT

The State of the Nation's Ecosystems: Measuring the Lands, Waters, and Living Resources of the United States. By The H. John Heinz Center for Science, Economics and the Environment. (The Center, Washington, DC) October 2002. 270 p.

Full Text at: www.heinzctr.org/ecosystems/pdf_files/sotne_complete.pdf

["In 1995, the Clinton Administration asked the Heinz Center - not affiliated with either environmental or industry groups -- to compile existing data to assess the health of the nation's environment. The report concludes that almost 50 percent of the information needed to make environmental policy is missing or inadequate.... The report makes a compelling argument for reporting environmental indicators, much as key data are reported to help gauge the state of the economy." Environmental News Service (October 2, 2002) 1.]

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FARM LAND

Farming on the Edge: Sprawling Development Threatens America's Best Farmland. By the American Farmland Trust. (The Trust, Washington, DC) October 2002. 6 p.

Full Text at: www.farmland.org/farmingontheedge/Farming%20on%20the%20Edge.pdf

["The United States is losing two acres of mostly prime farmland every minute to development, the fastest such decline in the country's history, a new study has found.... The report recommends more easements for farms and strong national standards for development. Vermont, California and Pennsylvania are cited as three states that have balanced development with farmland preservation." New York Times (October 4, 2002) A22.]

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NATIONAL PARKS

Code Red: America's Five Most Polluted Parks. By the National Parks Conservation Association. (The Association, Washington, DC) 2002. 36 p.

Full Text at: www.npca.org/across_the_nation/visitor_experience/code_red/codered.pdf

["Two Parks' Smog Prize No Surprise: Sequoia and Kings Canyon ... landed among the five worst national parks for air pollution.... The parks' chronic smog problems make the area the fourth-most polluted park site in the country, according to the association.... The next closest-ranking park in the West is Joshua Tree in Southern California" (Sacramento Bee (September 30, 2002) A3.]

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PESTICIDES

DPR Reports Pesticide Use Dropped to Record Low in 2001: Press Release. By the California Department of Pesticide Regulation. (The Department, Sacramento, California) October 16, 2002. 1 p.

["Pesticide use in California dropped to a new low in 2001 because of dry weather, a tight economy and stricter environmental controls, according to a state report.... Another factor was the tight economy. Some farmers couldn't afford to plant, or if they did plant, they couldn't afford to treat the fields." Sacramento Bee(October 16, 2001)D2.]

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WATER SUPPLY

Water Infrastructure: Information on Financing, Capital Planning, and Privatization. By the U.S. General Accounting Office. GAO-02-764. (The Office, Washington, DC) August 2002. 83 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-02-764

["Clean Water: Many Utilities Deferring Maintenance Due To Funding Crunch: Nearly one-third of U.S. water utilities are not able to fully fund their operating and capital costs through local charges as called for by trade organizations and are deferring important maintenance work, the GAO has found.... Utilities have said for years that they will need hundreds of billions of dollars over the next 20 years to replace aging infrastructures." Greenwire (September 19, 2002) 1.]

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National Water Quality Inventory: 2000 Report. And, The Clean Water and Drinking Water Infrastructute Gap Analysis. By U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water. (The Agency, Washington, DC) September 2002.

["More than a third of surveyed rivers, and about half of all lakes and estuaries are too polluted for swimming or fishing.... Runoff from farmland, sewage treatment plants and changes in the natural flow of streams and rivers is fouling the nation's waters.... The second report says that an increase in real spending on the nation's network of treatment plants by 3 percent above the rate of inflation would be required for cities and towns to keep up with pressing needs.... EPA's report made no recommendation on who should pick up the tab." San Francisco Chronicle (October 1, 2002) A3.]

National Water Quality Inventory: 2000 Report. 207 p.
www.epa.gov/305b/2000report

Clean Water and Drinking Water Infrastructute Gap Analysis. 50 p.
www.epa.gov/owm/gapreport.pdf

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"S.F. Looted Region's Water System, Diverted Millions into City Coffers." And "City Spurned Mandate for Public Power." By Chuck Finnie and Susan Sward. IN: San Francisco Chronicle, (September 15-16, 2002) A1.]

["The story of Hetch Hetchy Water and Power reflects the stunning betrayal of a civic vision.... Over the past 20 years, San Francisco officials raided the city's vaunted Hetch Hetchy Water and Power system of hundreds of millions of dollars, leaving the Bay Area's largest water supply vulnerable to earthquake, drought and decay.....City Hall leaders sold much of the energy to other communities and snatched the profits to line government coffers."]

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GENERAL GOVERNMENT

BUDGETING

Did States Overspend in the 1990s? By Elizabeth C. McNichol and Kevin Carey, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. (The Center, Washington, DC) October 15, 2002. 15 p.

Full Text at: www.cbpp.org/10-15-02sfp.pdf

["A report from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities examines changes in state spending during the 1990s and finds that state spending growth during the past decade was low by historical standards." HandsNet WebClipper Digest (October 18, 2002)]

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ELECTIONS

“Who Uses Inferior Voting Technology?” By Stephen Knack and Martha Kropf. IN: PSOnline, (September 2002) pp. 541-548.

[“A survey found 64% of respondents in favor of the federal government ‘outlawing so-called punchcard ballots.’ An overwhelming 87% favored a law ‘requiring all states and counties to use one kind of voting machine.'"]

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INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

The National Strategy to Secure Cyberspace: Draft for Comment. By the President's Critical Infrastructure Protection Board. (The Board, Washington, DC) September 18, 2002. 65 p.

Full Text at: www.whitehouse.gov/pcipb/cyberstrategy-draft.pdf

["Threats and Responses: The Internet; Revamped Proposal Suggests Strategies to Tighten Online Security: The document describes a society that has grown increasingly dependent on networked computer systems, and thus increasingly vulnerable to cyberterrorists.... The report raised fears among civil liberties advocates that the proposals rely heavily on more surveillance of computer networks -- and those who use them." New York Times (September 18, 2002) A21.]

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT

Taking Their Pulse: How The LAFCOs Implemented AB 2838 (Hertzberg, 2000). By The Senate Committee on Local Government. 1176-S. (The Committee, Sacramento, California) September 2002. 30 p.; Appendix.

["[This report] distills 40 findings from the LAFCOs responses to a dozen questions about implementing AB 2838.... Less than half of the LAFCOs have schedules for meeting the 2006 deadline for revising the spheres of influence for cities and special districts. Over half hiked their fees and over 3/4 have higher budgets after AB 2838."]

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PROPOSITIONS

Ballot Initiatives and Referenda in the 2002 Election: Election Preview. By the Ballot Initiative Strategy Center & Initiative and Referendum Institute. (The Institute, Washington, DC) September 25, 2002. 31 p.

["This November, voters in 38 states will get the opportunity to cast a vote on 200 statewide ballot measures -- 53 from the people (49 initiatives and 4 popular referendum) and 147 from the government.... 2002 will mark a 30% decrease from the last election in the number of initiatives placed on the ballot."]

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PUBLIC OPINION

Coping With Homeland Security in California: Surveys of City Officials and State Residents. By Mark Baldassare, Christopher Hoene, and Jonathan Cohen. Presented to League of California Cities Annual Conference (Public Policy Institute of California, San Francisco, California) October 4, 2002. 36 p.

Full Text at: www.ppic.org./publications/occasional/BaldassareHoeneCohenOP1002.pdf

["The report finds that Homeland Security is still a problem among Californians although the majority of survey respondents still feel confident in the way government has handled terrorist-related preparedness." California Capitol Hill Bulletin (October 10, 2002) 6.]

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STATE BUDGET

"States Bet On Gambling to Fill Their Budget Gaps." By Steve Wiegand. IN: Sacramento Bee (September 26, 2002) A1.]

["According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, 43 of the 50 states have budget gaps totaling a collective $35.9 billion at the start of the fiscal year that began July 1. Of that amount, $23.7 billion belonged to California.... With a state budget -- and a state budget deficit -- that dwarfs that of other states, California is not likely to find much relief in taxing its gamblers, even though the state's gambling market ranks behind only Nevada's in size."]

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VOTERS & VOTING

Pew Hispanic Center / Kaiser Family Foundation. National Survey of Latinos: The Latino Electorate. By Pew Hipanic Center. (The Center, Washington, DC) 2002. 44 p.

Full Text at: www.pewhispanic.org/site/docs/pdf/latino_chartpack_092002.pdf

["Latino voters are alluring to politicians but difficult to categorize a major new survey ... concludes. While largely registering as Democrats, Latino voters are also ideologically ambivalent, according to the survey. Broad support for liberal views, like a willingness to pay higher taxes for more government services, combines with equally broad endorsement of conservative touchstones, like opposition to abortion.... Although Latinos make up just 5 percent of all voters, they are seen by both major parties as key swing voters in ... midterm elections." Sacramento Bee (October 4, 2002) 1.]

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HEALTH

AUTISM

Report to the Legislature on the Principal Findings from The Epidemiology of Autism in California: A Comprehensive Pilot Study. By Robert Byrd and others. M.I.N.D. Instutute University of California, Davis. (The University, Davis, California) 2002. 70 p.

Full Text at: mindinstitute.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/news/study_final.pdf

["California's alarming increase in childhood autism is an authentic phenomenon that cannot be explained by flawed diagnosis, according to a new study.... The study ... found that a 273 percent jump in cases could not be explained by loosening of criteria describing the developmental disorder, misdiagnosis or an influx of people from other states.... Autism is now the fastest-growing segment of the state's developmental disability system.... State figures show that more than 6,500 new autism cases were seen at the treatment centers between 1999 and 2001." Sacramento Bee (October 18, 2002) A1.]

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CANCER

“Twenty-Year Follow-up of a Randomized Study Comparing Breast-Conserving Surgery with Radical Mastectomy for Early Breast Cancer.” By Umberto Veronesi and others. IN: New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 347, no. 16 (October 17, 2002) pp. 227-1232.

[“After monitoring … breast cancer patients for 20 years, researchers have concluded that women fare just as well with an operation that removes the cancerous lumps as they do by having the entire breast removed.” Sacramento Bee (October 17, 2002) A1.]

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Most States Adopt New Breast and Cervical Cancer Treatment Option. FFIS Issue Brief, 02-53. (FFIS Washington, DC) October, 8, 2002. 5. p., Tables.

["Each year, almost 50,000 women die from breast or cervical cancer. In recognition of the value of screening and early detection, Congress passed the Breast and Cervical Cancer Mortality Prevention Act of 1990. This act authorized provision of breast and cervical cancer screening services for underserved women, including older women, women with low incomes, and women of racial and ethnic minority groups....P.L. 106-354 allowed states to provide Medicaid coverage to women not otherwise insured who are identified through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP)."].

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MANAGED HEALTH CARE

HMO Report Card: The State of California 2002/03. By The Office of the Patient Advocate, Department of Managed Care. (The Office, Sacramento, California) 2002. 24 p.

Full Text at: www.opa.ca.gov/report_card/pdf_files/opa_report_cards_en.pdf

["Taking the Pulse of HMOs; State Report Also Adds Data on Doctors' Groups: California HMOs are doing a better job at immunizing children but aren't doing nearly enough to provide mental health care or screen for sexually transmitted diseases.... This year, state HMO regulators added a new feature: detailed quality reports on the large physician groups.... The report rates the state's top 10 heatlh plans on a variety of criteria." San Francisco Chronicle (October 2, 2002) 1.]

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OBESITY

Prevalence and Trends in Obesity Among U.S. Adults, 1999-2000. By Katherine M. Flegal. IN: JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association, vol. 288, no. 14 (October 9, 2002) pp. 1723-1727.

["Americans are deep in denial when it comes to how fat they are. What's worse, doctors and health experts warn, we're fatter than ever. Those two distrubing facts are made clear in a study. [In the study] only about 20 percent of the people said they were overweight enough to be considered obese. But scientific measurements showed that a whopping 31 percent actually were obese. That number has doubled over the past two decades." San Francisco Chronicle (October 9, 2002) A2.]

[Request #S6596]

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SMOKING

"Evidence of Real-World Effectiveness of a Telephone Quitline for Smokers." By Shu-Hong Zhu and others. IN: New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 347, no. 14 (October 2002) pp. 1087-1093.

["A decade after California became the first of 33 states to set up quit lines for smokers, a study found that telephone counseling works for those who want to kick the habit.... The findings ... show that smokers who were counseled stopped smoking at twice the rate of those who did not get such help." San Jose Mercury News (October 3, 2002) A6.]

[Request #S6598]

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HOUSING

HOME OWNERSHIP

Stock Market Wealth Widens Home Ownership Gap Between Whites and Minorities. By Greenlining Institute. (The Institute, San Francisco, California) 2002. 11 p.

Full Text at: www.greenlining.org/pages/homelendingreport2.doc

["Lending to Minorities Examined: The Institute's analysis revealed that, of the 13 major banks that made more than 200 conventional home loans in California in 2000, the majority provided less than 3% of those loans to African Americans. Despite these low percentages, all of the institutions making less than 3% received either an 'outstanding' or 'high satisfactory' grade on the rating system's lending test." Los Angeles Times (March 10, 2002) K1.]

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The Great Divide 2002: An Analysis of Racial and Economic Disparities in Home Purchase Mortgage Lending Nationally and in Sixty-Eight Metropolitan Areas. By the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now. (The Association, New York, New York) October 1, 2002. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.acorn.org/reporter_pub/index.php

["Mortgage Study Sees Racial Disparity; Applications in the Region from African Americans Are More Likely to Be Rejected: The analysis of transactions in El Dorado, Placer and Sacramento counties showed African American applicants in 2001 were 2.52 times as likely as whites to be turned down for conventional mortgages.... Similar disparities were recorded for Latino home shoppers, who were rejected 1.56 times more often than whites in both 2000 and 2001." Sacramento Bee (October 2, 2002) 1.]

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HUMAN SERVICES

CHILDREN

The State of Our Children: Children's Critical Early Years. By Sarah Grossman-Swenson. And California Report Card: Children's Critical Early Years. By Jayleen Richards and Amy Dominguez-Arms. (Children Now, Oakland, California) 2002.

[The state ranks 34th nationwide in the percentage of children who receive early childhood immunizations. The state has made 'headway' in some areas, however. The report found that California has the sixth-lowest rate of infant mortality and ninth-lowest rate of infants born with low birth weight nationwide. In addition, the teenage birth rate in the state has decreased slightly faster than the national average. However, the report concluded that California has not made young children a top priority. (Los Angeles Times (October 23, 2002)A1.

Report Card. 52 p.
http://www.childrennow.org/california/rc-2002/rc-2002.pdf

Full Report. 108 p.
http://www.childrennow.org/california/rc-2002/soc-2002.pdf

[Request #S6602]

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Religious Involvement and Children's Well-Being: What Research Tells Us (And What It Doesn't.) By Lisa J. Bridges and Kristin Anderson Moore. Child Trends. (Child Trends, Washington, DC) September 2002. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.childtrends.org/PDF/ReligiosityRB.pdf

["More than 60 percent of all American high school seniors agree that religion is "pretty" or "very" important to them and nearly half attend religious services at least once a month. This research indicates that religiosity translates into less risky behaviors among teens." News From Child Trends (September 19, 2002).]

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FAMILIES

More Than a Dating Service? State Activities Designed to Strengthen and Promote Marriage. By Mary Parke and Theodora Ooms, Center for Law and Social Policy. (The Center, Washington, DC) October 2002. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.clasp.org/DMS/Documents/1034879939.91/Marriage_Brief2.pdf

["This brief describes the surprisingly wide range of activities underway in states to promote marriage and two-parent families. No matter the outcome of the federal policy initiatives in this area, states and communities are likely to continue their efforts. As little is known yet about the effects of these new programs and policies, the authors suggest caution, creativity, and evaluation as policymakers move forward." HandsNet Webclipper Digest (October 18, 2002)]

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FOSTER CARE

HHS Awards Adoption Bonuses. By Federal Funds Information for States. FFIS Issue Brief, 02-51. (FFIS, Washington,DC) September 26, 2002. 3. p.

["The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded almost $17.5 million in fiscal year (FY) 2002 adoption bonuses to 23 states and Puerto Rico for increasing the number of children adopted from foster care....The bonuses provide financial incentives to states to increase adoptions of children in the foster care system."]

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TEMPORARY ASSISTANCE FOR NEEDY FAMILIES

HHS Awards Bonuses for Reducing Out-of-Wedlock Births. By Federal Funds Information for States. FFIS Issue Brief, 02-55. (FFIS, Washington, DC) October 9, 2002. 3. p. Tables

["The Department awarded $100 million in bonuses to Alabama, Colorado, Michigan and Texas, the District of Columbia and the Virgin Islands for achieving reductions in out-of-wedlock births....Each year, up to five states receive bonuses of $25 million or less."]

[Request #S6606]

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INTERNATIONAL READER

United States-Latin American Relations at the Century's Turn: Managing the "Intermestic" Agenda. By Abraham F. Lowenthal, Pacific Council on International Policy. (The Council, Los Angeles, California) [2002.]

["This brief suggests appropriate policy responses to issues, like immigration, narcotics, the environment, public health and border management, in the relationship between the U.S. and Latin America that are neither purely foreign or domestic and therefore difficult to grapple with."]

[Request #S4124]

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Cultivating Poverty: the Impact of U.S. Cotton Subsidies on Africa. By Kevin Watkins, Oxfam International. (Oxfam, Washington, DC) September 2002. 35 p.

Full Text at: www.oxfam.org.uk/policy/papers/30cotton/30Cotton.pdf

["Oxfam International, a nonprofit group focused on world poverty problems, issued a scathing report in which it charged that subsidies to big American cotton farming operations were wiping out African rivals. The criticisms are not new. But they are more intense this year, and they carried a special sting for the United States. Earlier this year, Congress passed and President Bush signed a bill that authorizes more than $100 billion in farm subsidies over the next eight years." New York Times (September 30, 2002) A8.]

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World Summit on Sustainable Development: Plan of Implementation. By the Division of Sustainable Development, Johannesburg Summit, United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs. (The Division, New York, New York) September 2002. 54 p.

Full Text at: www.johannesburgsummit.org/html/documents/summit_docs/2309_planfinal.doc

["Summit OKs Accords on Environment, Poverty: The plan contains dozens and dozens of initiatives that aim to do everything from removing trade barriers that burden the struggling economies of Third World nations to restoring the oceans' depleted fish stocks and reducing by half the 2 billion people who lack access to basic sanitation."]

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TRANSPORTATION

DRIVERS' LICENSES

Does Graduated Driver Licensing Reduce Drinking and Driving? An Examination of California's Teen Driving Restrictions. By Stephen Block, Public Affairs, Automobile Club of Southern California, and others. (The Club, Costa Mesa, California) 2002. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.aaa-calif.com/members/corpinfo/02_teen-driving-8-23.asp

["Fewer Teens in Crashes, Study Finds: Tough restrictions on new teenage drivers imposed four years ago have reduced the number of teens involved in alcohol-related crashes in California. The study on the impact of the program found that alcohol-related accidents involving 16 year-old drivers dropped 16% in the first year and 13% in the second year." Los Angeles Times (September 22, 2002) 1.]

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HIGHWAYS

Highway Infrastructure: Interstate Physical Conditions Have Improved, but Congestion and Other Pressures Continue. By Katherine A. Siggerud. The U.S. General Accounting Office. (The Office, Washington, DC) September 2002. 20 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/new.items/d021128t.pdf

["Congestion in Interstate highways has increased over the last decade, while the physical condition of the Interstate has generally improved, and the level of safety has remained steady.... Some of the factors states expect to negatively affect the conditions of their Interstate highways in the future include increases in passenger and freight traffic, aging infrastructure, and financial constraints."]

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SURFACE TRANSPORTATION

A Bold First Step for Mobility in the Sacramento Region: Metropolitan Transportation Plan for 2025. By Nancy Kays and others, Sacramento Association of Governments. (The Association, Sacramento, California) 2002. 156 p.

Full Text at: www.sacog.org/mtp/mtpfor2025.pdf

["Crafting Smart Transit Tactics Pivotal to Area's Future: The plan for 2025 will guide the investment of more than $22 billion in transportation improvements in the six-county region (El Dorado, Placer, Sacramento, Sutter, Yolo and Yuba) during the next 20 years." Sacramento Bee (September 18, 2002) 1.]

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The Quiet Crisis: Transportation and Mobility in Southern California. By the Automobile Club of Southern California. (The Club, Los Angeles, California) October 2002. 48 p.

Full Text at: www.aaa-calif.com/members/corpinfo/qc/quietcrisis.asp

["The Auto Club of Southern California has added its voice to the public debate over the region's worsening traffic congestion by issuing a plan that calls for increased spending on transportation, the construction of more freeway lanes and routine evaluations of existing transportation programs, among other ideas. The plan is the first comprehensive traffic blueprint issued by the 102-year-old organization and signals a growing frustration among its 5 million members over the region's increasing gridlock." Los Angeles Times (October 2, 2002) B5.]

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WASHINGTON READER

California Capitol Hill Bulletin. By the California Institute for Federal Policy Research. Volume 9, Bulletin 27 - 29, (The Institute, Washington, DC) October 3- 17, 2002. 12. p.

Full Text at: www.calinst.org/bulletins/bull929.pdf

[Includes: "Reps Farr and Dreier Seeking Unanimous Bipartisan Cosponsorship for California Missions Preservation Act;" "Californians Attentive To But Unenthusiastic About November Elections, PPIC Survey Finds;" "Stories Initiative Urges Californians to Read Steinbeck's Grapes of Wrath;" "House Floor Reading On October 8;" and others;" "Bipartisan California Delegation Backs Basing of Coast Guard Aircraft in State;" "President Moves To Reopen Ports;" "Metropolitan Water District Votes No on Cadez Project;" "Thousands of Klamath River Salmon Die;" and others.]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

HEALTH

AGING

"Sacramento Area Latino Study of Aging." By Mary Haan and others. IN: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, (October 2002)

["Older Latinos have a rate of dementia that is 50 percent highter than whites because of a higher incidence of diabetes and hypertension that often goes untreated.... SALSA (Sacramento Area Latino Study of Aging)is the first study of dementia that focuses specifically on Mexican Americans, the largest group of California's nearly 11 million Latinos, who make up 32.4 percent of the state's population." Sacramento Bee (September 26, 2002) A1.]

[Request #S6614]

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HOUSING

HOME OWNERSHIP

Locked Out: California's Affordable Housing Crisis: 2002. By The California Budget Project. (The Project, Sacramento, California) October 2002.

["The study cautions that the current [housing] crisis has serious implications for the families affected, the communities in which they live, and the well-being of the state's economy. The report also highlights the affordability challenges facing California renters, looks at homeownership trends, and goes beyond the current situation, examining issues such as the decline in housing construction and the growing jobs-housing imbalance."]

[Request #S6615]

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RENTAL HOUSING

Rental Housing for America's Poor Families: Farther Out of Reach Than Ever. By Winton Pitcoff and Sheila Crowley. National Low Income Coalition. (The Coalition, Washington, DC) 2002. Various pagings.

["For the forth consecutive year, the minimum wage was insufficient to cover the rent for adequate housing anywhere in the U.S., and Southern California has one of the widest affordability gaps.... U.S. workers must earn at least $14.66 an hour -- almost three times as much as the federal minimum wage of $5.15 -- to pay rent on standard two-bedroom apartment. California's hourly minimum was was increased this year by 50 cents to $6.75, but that still is less than half of what renters need to earn to afford a standard apartment in the Los Angeles region." Los Angeles Times (September 19, 2002) 1.]

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