Subject: Studies in the News 02-14 (February 28, 2002)


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News
Health Supplement


Contents This Week

Introductory Material HEALTH
   Effects of corporal punishment on children
   Addressing oral health needs
   Oral health in America
   Toxic contamination near school sites
   Reproductive technology success rates
   Health care system forecast
   Vision for health system reform
   Extending health insurance to children
   Employer-based health insurance threatened
   Health insurance and families leaving welfare
   Health insurance access and use in California
   Not-for-profit community hospitals
   Universal newborn hearing screening
   Hepatitis C prevalence
   Health data rules compliance
   Effects of short-term coverage loss
   Investigation for lead-poisoned children
   Better lead screening for children
   Expanding coverage for working families
   Insuring the near elderly
   Eating disorders
   Mistreatment of mentally ill
   Cultural competence programs for health care
   Racial and ethnic rates for health indicators
   Epidemic increase in childhood overweight
   Inapropriate drug prescription to seniors
   Prescription drugs and advertising
   Direct-to-consumer advertising of pharmaceuticals
   Health care access for uninsured
   Unsatisfactory progress on women's health
   Migration patterns of minorities in medical profession
STUDIES TO COME
   Studies in the News, January 22, 2002
   Studies in the News, January 29, 2002
   Studies in the News, February 19, 2002
   Studies in the News, February 22, 2002
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News is a very current compilation of items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau to supplement the public policy debate in California’s Capitol. To help share the latest information with state policymakers, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library’s website. This week's list of current articles in various public policy areas is presented below.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • Items in the State Library collection can be checked out to state officials and staff.

  • Access to all materials listed will be provided by the State Information Reference Center, either by e-mail to cslsirc@library.ca.gov or by calling 654-0261.

The following studies are currently on hand:

HEALTH

CHILDREN

Beating the Devil Out of Them: Corporal Punishment in American Families and its Effects on Children. By Murray A. Straus. (Transaction Publishers, Piscataway, New Jersey) 2001. 317 p.

["Schools Are Still Fighting Over the Right to Paddle: The problem with corporal punishment, (Murray) Straus stresses, is that it has lasting effects that include increased agression and social difficulties. Straus studied over 800 mothers over a period from 1988 to 1992 and found that children who were spanked were more rebellious after four years, even after controlling for their initial behaviors." U.S. News & World Report (June 18, 2001) 43. note: Beating the Devil ... is available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S4375]

Return to the Table of Contents

DENTAL CARE

Addressing Oral Health Needs: A How-to Guide. Compiled by Health Care For All Community Catalyst (The Catalyst, Boston, Massachusetts) January 2002. 38 p.

Full Text at: www.hcfama.org/acrobat/How_to_Guide_2002_final.pdf

["Approximately 150 million Americans have no dental insurance coverage, triple the approximately 43 million who lack health insurance.... This guide briefly profiles types of oral health programs in the United States.... [It] highlights successes and challenges associated with different approaches to the oral health access problem."]

[Request #S4376]

Return to the Table of Contents

Filling the Gaps: Oral Health in America: Oral Health Report Card. By Campaign for Oral Health Parity (The Campaign, Chicago, Illinois) 2002. 15 p.

Full Text at: www.oralhealthamerica.org/Oral%20Health%20Report%20Final1.pdf

["Nation's Oral Health Needs Brushing Up: The U.S. Earned a Dismal C on a National Report card: The report says that many children and older Americans don't have adequate dental care. The nation lags in prevention programs and in access to care among the poor, the elderly and children, many of whom don't have insurance and haven't seen a dentist in the past year. California's score was equally disappointing (we are one of the six states that don't have a dental director)" Los Angeles Times (February 4, 2002) S2.]

[Request #S4377]

Return to the Table of Contents

ENVIRONMENTAL TOXINS

Poisoned Schools: Invisible Threats, Visible Actions. By Lois Gibbs, Center for Health, Environment and Justice (The Center, Falls Church, Virginia) 2001. 83 p.

Full Text at: www.bredl.org/pdf/Poisoned_Schools.pdf

["This report offers specific recommendations to protect children from chemical contamination in air and soil surrounding schools and from exposure to toxic pesticides in schools and on school grounds.... Pesticide use and school siting are just two of the many pervasive environmental health problems in our school systems. Other concerns include ventilation, air quality, toxic school products, renovation, maintenance, and sanitation."]

[Request #S4378]

Return to the Table of Contents

FAMILY PLANNING

1999 Assisted Reproductive Technology Success Rates. By the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and others. (The Centers, Atlanta, Georgia) December 2001. 470 p.

Full Text at: www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/drh/ART99/PDF's/1999ART.pdf

["About 15% of women of childbearing age in the United States have received an infertility service. Assisted reproductive technology (ART) has been used in the United States since 1981 to help women become pregnant.... Presenting information about ART success rates is a complex task. This report is intended for the general public, and the emphasis is on presenting the information in an easily understandable form."]

[Request #S4379]

Return to the Table of Contents

HEALTH CARE

A Perfect Storm: The Confluence of Forces Affecting Health Care Coverage. By Joel E. Miller, National Coalition on Health Care. (The Coalition, Washington, DC) November 2001. 22 p.

Full Text at: www.nchc.org/APerfectStorm.pdf

["Looming Health Care Storm: A hurricane-force 'perfect storm' of dangerous health care currents will hit the American economy next year, a bipartisan coalition warned last month. It will uproot at least 6 million plans and swamp employers as health care costs rise at four times the overall inflation rate." Los Angeles Times (December 17, 2001) A10.]

[Request #S4380]

Return to the Table of Contents

HEALTH CARE REFORM

A Vision for a Compassionate and Affordable Health System. By Richard D. Lamm, Center for Public Policy and Comtemporary Issues, University of Denver. Prepared for the National Conference of State Legislatures. (NCSL, Denver, Colorado) November 2001. 15 p.

["Experts rate the U. S. health care system toward the bottom in comparison with other developed countries.... Americans, in fact, limit health care in one of the cruelest ways that any nation can -- by simply leaving people out of the system.... Oregon is the first (and only) state to directly confront the trade-off between the who and the what.... Not only is the Oregon Health Plan ethical, it is unethical for a state not to have a system of priorities."]

[Request #S4381]

Return to the Table of Contents

HEALTH INSURANCE

Communities Play Key Role in Extending Public Health Insurance to Children. By Laurie E. Felland and Andrea Benoit, Center for Studying Health System Change. (The Center, Washington, DC) October 2001. 12 p.

Full Text at: www.hschange.org/CONTENT/377/

["Millions of eligible children still lack health insurance coverage.... States have turned to local communities to assist with SCHIP outreach. The Center's recent site visits to 12 nationally representative communities found many organizations ... playing important outreach roles.... These community efforts offer a valuable road map."]

[Request #S4382]

Return to the Table of Contents

How the Slowing U.S. Economy Threatens Employer-Based Health Insurance. By Jeanne M. Lambrew. Georgetown University. Prepared for the Commonwealth Fund Task Force on the Future of Health Insurance. (The Fund, Washington, DC) November 2001. 33 p.

Full Text at: www.cmwf.org/programs/insurance/lambrew_slowingeconomy_511.pdf

["Rising unemployment and health care costs threaten to erode employer-based health insurance coverage, the major source of health coverage in the nation.... This report summarizes recent findings of other reports and provides new analysis of job-based health insurance, unemployment, and the economic consequences of the lack of health coverage. It also discusses policy options and issues."]

[Request #S4383]

Return to the Table of Contents

Health Insurance, Welfare, and Work. By Alan Weil and John Holahan. Welfare Reform and Beyond, Policy Brief No. 11. Prepared for the Brookings Institution (The Institution, Washington, DC) December 2001. 7 p.

Full Text at: www.brookings.edu/wrb/publications/pb/pb11.pdf

["Many families leaving welfare continue to lose health insurance, despite the fact that the families -- or at least their children -- remain eligible for coverage. Future steps to improve the relationship between health and welfare must complete the 'de-linking' of these programs.... The federal government should retain and expand incentives for states to expand coverage and simplify systems."]

[Request #S4384]

Return to the Table of Contents

Health Insurance, Access, and Use: State Profiles: California: Tabulations from the 1999 National Survey of America's Famillies. By Jennifer M. Haley and Matthew Fragale, Urban Institute. SP-02. (The Institute, Washington, DC) December 2001. 30 p.

Full Text at: newfederalism.urban.org/pdf/CA_HealthProfile.pdf

["[This state profile] presents detailed descriptive information on health insurance coverage, access to care, and health care utilization in California and the nation. The tabulations are based on the 1999 National Survey of American Families."]

[Request #S4385]

Return to the Table of Contents

HOSPITALS

Mission Critical: The Esential Role of Not-For-Profit Community Hospitals to California's Health Care Delivery System. By Penny Stroud Cattaneo and Stroud, Inc. (Penny Stroud Cattaneo and Stroud, Burlingame, California) 2001. 33 p.

Full Text at: www.cattaneostroud.com/nonpros/mission_critical_report.pdf

["This report describes the essential role of not-for-profit organizations in the stewardship of community-based healthcare.... The report documents the challenges facing our health care system, the pivotal role of not-for-profit providers in maintaining access and quality, and the not-for-profit sector's vital investments in research, innovation and infrastucture."]

[Request #S4386]

Return to the Table of Contents

INFANTS

"The Colorado Newborn Hearing Screening Project, 1992-1999: On the Threshold of Effective Population-Based Universal Newborn Hearing Screening." By Albert L. Mehl and Vickie Thomson. IN: Pediatrics, vol. 109, no. 1 (January 2002) pp. e7.

Full Text at: www.pediatrics.org/cgi/content/full/109/1/e7

["This article reports the results of a statewide screening program, from earlier years of voluntary hospital enrollment through later years of legislative directives. The study represents the first publication of broad population-based hospital screening efforts and measures the relative success of legislation in achieving universal newborn hearing screening."]

[Request #S4387]

Return to the Table of Contents

INFECTIOUS DISEASE

The Hepatitis C Strategic Plan : A Collaborative Approach to the Emerging Epidemic in California. By Health and Education Communication Consultants. (The Consultants, Berkeley, California) 2001. 32 p.

Full Text at: www.dhs.cahwnet.gov/ps/dcdc/pdf/Hepatitis%20C%20Strategic%20Plan%20-%202001.pdf

["4 million Americans are infected with hepatits C.... In 1999, it was estimated that there were approximately 30,000 new acute infections each year, but only 25-30% of these will be diagnosed. Hepatitis C accounts for 20% of all cases if acute hepatitis and is currently responsible for an estimated 8,000-10,000 deaths annually. Without effective interventions, the number is likely to triple within the next 10-20 years. Hepatitis C is now the leading reason for liver transplantation in the United States."]

[Request #S4388]

Return to the Table of Contents

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Comparing eHealth Privacy Initiatives. By Angela Choy and Janlori Goldman, Health Privacy Project, Institute for Health Care Research Policy, Georgtown University. Prepared for the California HealthCare Foundation. (The Foundation, Oakland, California) November 2001. 23 p.

Full Text at: admin.chcf.org/documents/ehealth/ComparingEHealthPrivacyInitiatives.pdf

["According to the survey, 41 percent have developed a grievance policy to address complaints and breaches of confidentiality, and 53 percent have developed policies related to patient access to medical records.... But more than three-fourths (78 percent) of the respondents reported that they have not developed policies to comply with a provision that requires covered groups share only the 'minimum necessary' amount of information for each purpose for disclosures inside and outside the organization." BNA'S Health Care Policy Report (December 17, 2001) 1871.]

[Request #S4389]

Return to the Table of Contents

INSURANCE

Security Matters: How Instability in Health Insurance Puts U.S. Workers at Risk: Findings from the Commonwealth Fund 2001 Health Insurance Survey. By Lisa Duchon and others, the Commonwealth Fund. (The Fund, New York, New York) December 2001. 63 p.

Full Text at: www.cmwf.org/programs/insurance/duchon_securitymatters_512.pdf

["Adults who lacked health insurance coverage for any period of time over a yearlong period were two to four times more likely to have gone without needed medical care than were adults who remained covered for the entire year.... The report said that more than half of adults with any time unisured in the past year reported a time that they did not see a doctor when sick, did not fill a prescrition, skipped recommended medical tests or treatment, or did not see a specialitst because of the cost."BNA'S Health Care Policy Report, December 17, 2001.p.1872.]

[Request #S4390]

Return to the Table of Contents

LEAD POISONING

Another Link in the Chain Update: State Policies and Practices for Case Management and Environmental Investigation for Lead-Poisoned Children. By Pat McLaine and Joanna Gaitens, National Center for Healthy Housing. (The Center, Columbia, Maryland) November 2001. 77 p.

Full Text at: www.centerforhealthyhousing.org/Link_in_Chain_Update.pdf

["This survey, an update to Another Link in Chain conducted in 2000 by staff of the National Center for Lead Safe Housing, was limited in scope to documenting any changes since 1998 in policies and practices for case management and environmental investigation for lead poisoned children.... Additional details for state and local programs[are included]."]

[Request #S4391]

Return to the Table of Contents

Track, Monitor, and Respond: Three Keys to Better Lead Screening for Children in Medicaid. By The Alliance to End Childhood Lead Poisoning. Prepared for The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Cooperative Agreement 18-C-91119/3-01. (The Centers, Washington, DC) 2001. 11 p.

Full Text at: www.aeclp.org/lead%20job%202.pdf

["The materials [in this report] are divided into three sections: The Tracking section has recommendations on collecting essential information on lead screening; The Monitoring section has suggestions on strategies for utilizing information; The Responding section is a case study of a visible and effective response to health care providers that is based on tracking and performance monitoring."]

[Request #S4392]

Return to the Table of Contents

MEDICAID

Expanding Family Coverage: States’ Medicaid Eligibility Policies for Working Families in the Year 2000. By Shannon Blaney and others, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. (The Center, Washington, DC) December 2001. 68 p.

Full Text at: www.cbpp.org/1-2-02health.pdf

["The percentage of low-income parents who are insured by Medicaid fell by almost one-quarter from 1995 to 2000 ... and the share who are uninsured rose by 7 percent. While 12 states have substantially expanded low-income working parents' eligibility for Medicaid since 1997, income eligibility limits for parents in most states remain well below the poverty line, and about one-third of low-income parents remain uninsured.... Uninsurance rates for low-income parents will rise even further unless states are able to expand publicly-funded coverage."]

[Request #S4393]

Return to the Table of Contents

MEDICARE

Insuring the Near Elderly: The Potential Role for Medicare Buy-In Plans. By Richard W. Johnson and others, Urban Institute. Brief Series No. 13. (The Institute, Washington, DC) January 2002. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.urban.org/retirement/briefs/13/Brief13.pdf

["This brief describes findings from a recent study that examined potential participation rates in alternative Medicare buy-in plans and measured the potential impact of these plans on rates of uninsurance. The study found that many individuals younger than 65 would purchase Medicare coverage if a buy-in plan were available.... Only a Medicare buy-in that provided subsidies to make the plan affordable to low-income people would significantly reduce uninsurance rates among the near elderly."]

[Request #S4394]

Return to the Table of Contents

MENTAL HEALTH

Eating Disorders: Facts About Eating Disorders and the Search for Solutions. By Melissa Spearing,Office of Communications and Public Liaison, National Institute of Mental Health. (The Institute, Bethesda, MD) 2001. 12 p.

Full Text at: www.nimh.nih.gov/publicat/eatingdisorder.cfm

["More than 5 million Americans suffer from eating disorders, according to the institute, and the National Eating Disorders Screening Program estimates that 1,000 women die each year because of anorexia nervosa alone." Las Vegas Review-Journal (January 27, 2002) 5J.]

[Request #S4395]

Return to the Table of Contents

Mad in America: Bad Science, Bad Medicine, and the Enduring Mistreatment of the Mentally Ill. By Robert Whitaker. (Perseus Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts) January 2002. 304 p.

["Over the past twenty-five years, outcomes for people in the United States with schizophrenia have worsened.... This medical failure is a profound one. More than 2 million Americans suffer from schizophrenia.... a 'disease' that costs the United States more than $45 billion annually.... The day will come when people will look back at our current medicines for schizophrenia and ... the stories we tell our patients ... and they will shake their heads in disbelief." NOTE: Mad in America ... is available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S4396]

Return to the Table of Contents

MINORITIES

Cultural Competence Works: Using Cultural Competence to Improve the Quality of Health Care for Diverse Populations and Add Value to Managed Care Arrangements. By the Health Resources and Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Administration, Washington, DC) 2001. 78 p.

Full Text at: www.hrsa.gov/financeMC/cultural-competence.pdf

["The Center for Health Services Financing and Managed Care sponsored the Cultural Competence Works Competition, a nationwide search ... to recognize and honor outstanding HRSA-funded programs and highlight the practices they employ to provide care for diverse populations.... This publication provides a summary of culturally competent practices as reported in the program nominations."]

[Request #S4397]

Return to the Table of Contents

"Trends in Racial and Ethnic-Specific Rates for the Health Status Indicators: United States, 1990-1998." By Kenneth G. Keppel, Jeffrey N. Pearcy, and Diane K. Wagener. Department of Health and Human Services. IN: Healthy People Statistical Notes no. 23. (January 2002) pp. 1-16.

Full Text at: www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/statnt/statnt23.pdf

["In this report national trends in racial and ethnic-specific rates for 17 health status indicators are examined for the period from 1990-1998.... While rates for the health status indicators have improved, not all groups have benefited equally and substantial differences among racial/ethnic groups persist."]

[Request #S4398]

Return to the Table of Contents

OBESITY

"Epidemic Increase in childhood Overweight 1986-1998." By R. S. Strauss and H. A. Pollack. IN: JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association, vol. 286, no. 22 (December 12, 2001) pp. 2845-2848.

["The findings from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, a prospective cohort study of 8270 children aged 4 to 12 years conducted from 1986 to 1998 ... were analyzed.... The roles of race/ethnicity, sex, income, and region of residence were also examined.... Childhood overweight continues to increase rapidly ... particularly among African Americans and Hispanics. Culturally competent treatment strategies as well as other policy interventions are required to increase physical activity and encourage healthy eating patterns among children."]

[Request #S4399]

Return to the Table of Contents

PRESCRIPTION DRUGS

"Potentially Inappropriate Medication Use in the Community-Dwelling Elderly,Findings from the 1996 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey." By Chunliu Zahn, others. IN: JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association, vol. 286, no. 22 (December 12, 2001) pp. 2823-2829; 2866.

["Approximately one in five American seniors who do not live in nursing homes has been prescribed inapporpriate, and potentially dangerous, medications, according to a study from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).... Nearly 1 million seniors used at least one of 11 medications found to be unsuitable for the elderly by a panel of geriatric medicine and pharmacy experts." BNA'S Health Care Policy Report(December 17, 2001) 1971.]

[Request #S4400]

Return to the Table of Contents

Prescription Drugs and Mass Media Advertising, 2000. By the National Institute for Health Care Management Research and Education Foundation. (The Institute, Washington, DC) November 2001. 17 p.

Full Text at: www.nihcm.org/DTCbrief2001.pdf

["A relatively small number of prescription drugs that were advertised to the public in 2000 contributed significantly to the increase in pharmaceutical spending in the U.S. from 1999 to 2000.... Spending on mass media (also called 'direct-to-consumer' or DTC advertising of prescription drugs rose 35% from 1999 to 2000.... No detailed studies have yet proven a direct cause and effect link between DTC ads and arising pharmaceutical costs. Several recent analyses suggest such a link, however."]

[Request #S4401]

Return to the Table of Contents

New Reports Show Impact of Direct-to-Consumer Advertising and Trends in Prescription Drug Spending and Utilization. By the Kaiser Family Foundation. (The Foundation, Menlo Park, California) November 29, 2001. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.kff.org/content/2001/20011129a/

["National spending on prescription drugs is the fastest growing segment of health care spending, accounting for 20% of the estimated increase in such spending.... Spending on advertising directly to consumers increased nine-fold from $266 million in 1994 to nearly $2.5 billion in 2000.... A new survey finds that ... one in eight has received a prescription in response to seeing an ad.... A separate report outlines trends in prescription drug expenditures and factors driving their growth, and prescription drug utilization, including types of drugs used."]

[Request #S4402]

Return to the Table of Contents

UNINSURED POPULATION

Health Care Access for Uninsured Adults: A Strong Safety Net is Not the Same as Insurance. By John Holahan and Brenda Spillman. Urban Institute. (The Institute, Washington, DC) January 2002 8 p.

Full Text at: newfederalism.urban.org/pdf/anf_b42.pdf

["This brief examines the extent to which differences in the safety net environment account for differences in the uninsureds' access to and use of health care.... It draws on representative samples of the population from 13 states -- Alabama, California, Colorado, Florida, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, New Jersey, New York, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin."]

[Request #S4403]

Return to the Table of Contents

WOMEN

Making the Grade on Women's Health: A National and State-By-State Report Card. By The National Women’s Law Center, with the FOCUS on Health & Leadership for Women, center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and Oregon Health & Science University. (The Center, Washington, DC) December 2001. 254 p.

Full Text at: www.nwlc.org/pdf/2001ReportCardExecutivesummary.pdf

["The United State received an overall grade of 'unsatisfactory' and none of the 50 states garnered a 'satisfactory' rating in a report card assessing federal and state actions to improve women's health, unveiled December 11.... The report examined 33 health status indicators and 32 health policy indictors that address a number of women's health issues, including preventive care, access to health insurance and prescription drug coverage, long-term care, and mental health." BNA'S Health Care Policy Report (December 17,2001) 1873.]

[Request #S4404]

Return to the Table of Contents

WORK CONDITIONS

Holding onto Our Own: Migration Patterns of Underrepresented Minority Californians in Medicine: Detailed Research Findings from the Authors’ Pages. By Janet Coffman, Center for California Health Workforce Studies, and others. (The Center, Berkeley, California) [December] 2001. 18 p.

Full Text at: www.ucop.edu/cprc/medmigration.pdf

["The study was undertaken to assess the relationship between practice location and location of medical school and residency. Data on Californians pursuing careers in medicine were analyzed to determine whether underrepresented minority Californians who complete medical school and/or residency in California are more likely to practice in California. The study also assessed whither migration patterns differ among racial/ethnic groups."]

[Request #S4405]

Return to the Table of Contents


STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

HEALTH CARE

"Health." IN: Studies in the News, 02-03 (January 22, 2002).

Full Text at: www.library.ca.gov/sitn/2002/0203.htm#HEALTH

[Includes: "Eliminating barriers for the disabled;" "Prices on prescription drugs;" "Student physical fitness tests;" "Potential dangers of irradiated food;" and "Federal requirements for health insurance."]

[Request #S4406]

Return to the Table of Contents

"Health." IN: Studies in the News, 02-06 (January 29, 2002).

Full Text at: www.library.ca.gov/sitn/2002/0206.htm#HEALTH

[Includes: "Projections;" "Funding in 2002;" "Premature infants less troubled as teens;" "Stress reaction after September 11 attack;" "Depression treatment rates triple;" "Medicaid purchases of prescription drugs;" "Prescription discounts for health centers;" "Flavored cigarettes popular among youth;" "States' allocation of tobacco settlement;" and "Laid-off workers lose health coverage."]

[Request #S4407]

Return to the Table of Contents

"Health." IN: Studies in the News, 02-10 (February 19, 2002).

Full Text at: www.library.ca.gov/sitn/2002/0210.htm#HEALTH

[Includes: "Advisory report on human cloning;" "Suits against water utilities;" "Urban Indian health;" "Newborn trends 1990-1999;" "Nursing staff ratios;" and "Creating safe learning zones."]

[Request #S4408]

Return to the Table of Contents

"Health." IN: Studies in the News, 02-12 (February 22, 2002).

Full Text at: www.library.ca.gov/sitn/2002/0212.htm#HEALTH

[Includes "Asthma in children exposed to ozone;" "Funding traumatic brain injury services;" "Inpatient rehabilitation facility payment system;" "States' Medicaid eligibility policies;" "Medi-Cal enrollment of former welfare recipients;" and "Health disparities and mental retardation."]

[Request #S4409]

Return to the Table of Contents