Subject: Studies in the News 02-10


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News


California -- One Hundred and Fifty Years Ago

1852 - "In 1852, the California Legislature believed Congress would cede to California a part of the Territory of Utah (now part of the State of Nevada) adjacent to California's mining frontier. So Pautah County was formed in territory outside of California adjacent to California's eastern boundary, roughly from the southern end of present Lassen County to the middle of the present eastern boundary of Mono County….. In 1852 Siskiyou County was created from parts of Shasta and Klamath Counties; Sierra County was created from part of Yuba County.; [and] Tulare County was created from part of Mariposa County. "  California Counties — A Chronology p. 1  

1852 - "In 1852 the Young Ladies Seminary opens in Benicia, then the state capital of California. Cyrus and Susan Mills later purchased the Seminary. In 1889 Mills College [will] grant the first B.A. degree awarded to women west of the Mississippi."  http://www.mills.edu/mills_history/history.html  

Contents This Week

Introductory Material CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT
   Classes for inmates reduce recidivism
   Legal services programs
   Criminal justice information systems
   Prisoner reentry and the community
   Biometric security technology
DEMOGRAPHY
   2000 Census challenges
   City families and suburban singles
ECONOMY AND SOCIETY
   Terrorism impact on U.S. cities
   UCLA Internet report 2001
   Hispanics and current economic downturn
   Impact of recession on Hispanic workers
   Latino economic losses in recession
   Enhancing Independent System Operator
EDUCATION
    Testing and diversity in postsecondary education
   Outcomes for after school programs
   Linguistic landscape of California schools
   Charter schools
   Class size reduction in California
   Building standards in higher education
   UC partnerships with industry and government
EMPLOYMENT
   Status of women in management
   Millions likely to exhaust UI benefits
ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES
   Proactive environmental management
   Draft ten year plan for Klamath River
   Assessment of agricultural easements
   Globalization and privatization of fresh water
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
   Income taxation and campaign finance reform
   2001 state election reform
   Election law journal
   California initiative process
   Race, ethnicity and the initiative process
   State of the states
   State tax revenue in decline
   Absentee voting for March 4 primary
HEALTH
   Advisory report on human cloning
   Suits against water utilities
   Urban Indian health
   Newborn trends 1990-1999
   Nursing staff ratios
   Creating safe learning zones
HUMAN SERVICES
   Pediatricians take stand on gay adoptions
   Gay adoption
   CalWORKs project research
   Foster care today
   Supports for working poor
   Perils of early motherhood
   Out-of-wedlock childbearing
   Funding issues for TANF reauthorization
TRANSPORTATION
   Petroleum consumption forecast
WASHINGTON READER
STUDIES TO COME
   Preschool for all
   National Academy interim report on Klamath River fish
   Child advocacy primer
   Children and welfare reform
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News is a very current compilation of items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau to supplement the public policy debate in California’s Capitol. To help share the latest information with state policymakers, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library’s website. This week's list of current articles in various public policy areas is presented below.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • Items in the State Library collection can be checked out to state officials and staff.

  • Access to all materials listed will be provided by the State Information Reference Center, either by e-mail to cslsirc@library.ca.gov or by calling 654-0261.

The following studies are currently on hand:

CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT

COLLEGE CAMPUSES

Three States Recidivism Study. By Stephan J. Steurer and others, Correctional Education Association. Prepared for Office of Correctional Education, U.S. Department of Education. (The Association, Lanham, Maryland) September 2001. 63 p.

Full Text at: www.ceanational.org/documents/3StateFinal.pdf

[“Prison education programs are being viewed more favorably as policy makers begin to question the wisdom of the 'get tough' philosophy that has dominated criminal-justice policy over the past decade….. Many prison wardens think educational programs help maintain order in the cellblocks.... Inmates are generally offered access to college classes only if they behave well.... Inmates who took any classes at all were 23 percent less likely than other convicts to be imprisoned again.” Chronicle of Higher Education (February 8, 2002) A26.]

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CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

Strategic Directions 2000-2005: Progress Report for 2001 – Programs. By the Legal Services Corporation. (The Corporation, Washington, DC) January 8, 2002. 21 p.

Full Text at: www.lsc.gov/websitedocs/sd01.pdf

["[The publication] challenges Legal Services Corporation (LSC)staff to expand the support offered to LSC programs and to increase state planning guidance specifically to improve clients' opportunities to access a full range of high quality civil legal services.... Innovations in staff assignments and approaches have brought about more focused state planning efforts throughout the country and program support that emphasizes strengthening quality at individual organizations and within the state legal services delivery structure."]

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INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Integrated Criminal Justice Information Systems. By Heather Morton, National Conference of State Legislatures. (NCSL, Denver, Colorado) 2001. 30 p.

["An integrated criminal justice information system uses technology to allow the seamless sharing of information at critical decision points throughout the justice system.... This report highlights the experiences of three states -- Colorado, Kansas and Minnesota --including how the systems were developed, the current status and future promise of integrated criminal justice information, the role of the legislature and funding history."]

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PRISONERS & PAROLEES

Prisoner Reentry Seen Through a Community Lens. By Jeremy Travis, The Justice Policy Center, Urban Institute. Presented to the Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation Training Institute. (The Institute, Washington, DC) 2001. 7 p.

Full Text at: www.urban.org/pdfs/prisoner-reentry-speech.pdf

["This year, 600,000 individuals will leave prisons of our state and federal governments and return home.... The aggressive cycle of arrest ... incarceration and reentry is highly concentrated in communities that are already facing poverty, crime, disinvestment and inadequate social services.... Communities have turned their attention to the consequences of imprisonment.... We realize we need to rethink our whole approach to punishment."]

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VIDEO SURVEILLANCE

Your Face Is Not a Bar Code: Arguments Against Automatic Face Recognition in Public Places. By Philip E. Agre, Department of Information Studies, University of California, Los Angeles. (The Department, Los Angeles, California) November 14, 2001. 14 p.

Full Text at: dlis.gseis.ucla.edu/people/pagre/bar-code.html

["Security technology and other issues: The biometric technology we're hearing about most often is facial recognition.... Phil Agre, an associate professor at UCLA's Information Science Department who tracks technology vs. privacy issues, has written a thoughtful essay ... [which lists] arguments against automatic face recognition in public places." Information Today (December 1, 2001) 34.]

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DEMOGRAPHY

CENSUS

2000 Census: Coverage Evaluation Interviewing Overcame Challenges, but Further Research Needed. By the U.S. General Accounting Office. GAO-02-26. (The Office, Washington, DC) 2001. 45 p.

["This report provides the results of our review of the U.S. Census Bureau's Accuracy and Coverage Evaluation (A.C.E.) person interviewing operation. A.C.E. used an independent sample survey to assess the quality of the population data collected by the 2000 Census by estimating the number of people missed, counted more than once, or otherwise improperly counted in the census."]

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POPULATION

City Families and Suburban Singles: An Emerging Household Story from Census 2000. By William H. Frey, University of Michigan Population Studies Center and Milken Institute and Alan Berube, Brookings Institution Center on Urban and Metropolitan Policy. (The Center, Washington, DC) February 2002. 22 p.

Full Text at: www.brookings.edu/es/urban/census/freyfamilies.pdf

["Cities and Suburbs Are Trading Places; Young Singles, Other 'Non-Families' Taking Over Outer Areas, Study Shows: A role reversal between cities and suburbs is rewriting a demographic script that has dominated American Life for decades. Young singles, elderly widows and other such 'non-family households' now outnumber married-with-children homes in the nation's suburbs, creating changes in demand for housing, entertainment and services in the communities where most Americans live." Washington Post (February 6, 2002) A3.]

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ECONOMY AND SOCIETY

CITIES

The Potential Impacts of Recession and Terrorism on U.S. Cities. Alan Berube and Alice Rivlin, the Brookings Institution. (The Institution, Washington, DC) January 2002. 22 p.

Full Text at: www.brookings.edu/es/urban/publications/recession.pdf

["Cities Struggle in September 11's Wake: The report says cities are in a stronger position to weather this recession than previous downturns because they've reduced dependence on manufacturing jobs. 'The economy has become diverse and dispersed,' says Bruce Katz, director of the Center on Urban and Metropolitan Policy at Brookings. 'Suburbs have become such phenomenal job centers that they have become as vulnerable as cities.... The pain is being spread pretty wide.'" USA Today (January 28, 2002) 3A.]

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INTERNET

The UCLA Internet Report 2001: Surveying the Digital Future: Year Two. By Jeffrey I. Cole and others. (UCLA Center for Communication Policy, Los Angeles, California) November 29, 2001. 95 p.

Full Text at: www.ccp.ucla.edu/pdf/UCLA-Internet-Report-2001.pdf

["Web Users Average Folks, Study Says; UCLA Survey Casts Doubt on Fears of Social Isolation: The study tracked the online habits of 2,096 respondents -- including both Internet users and nonusers -- who mirror the nation's ethnic, economic and geographic makeup. 66.9 percent of Americans use the Internet.... 86.3 percent of Americans with college degrees use the Internet.... 31.2 percent have less than high school experience." Daily News of Los Angeles (October 26, 2001) 1.]

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LATINOS

Hispanics and the Current Economic Downturn: Will the Receding Tide Sink Hispanics? By Alan B. Krueger, Princeton University, and Jonathan M. Orszag, Sebago Associates. Prepared for Pew Hispanic Center, Pew Charitable Trusts. (The Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) January 2002. 34 p.

Full Text at: www.pewtrusts.com/pdf/vf_pew_hispanic_downturn.pdf

["Latinos Hit Hard By This Recession, Study Concludes; Center Predicts Long, Difficult Recovery: Hispanics are being hit hard by the economic recession and will take longer to recover than other groups.... Latino workers are more greatly affected ... because they are heavily employed in sectors such as food service, transportation and hospitality.... Analysts foresee especially high unemployment and strains on social services in the eight states [including California] where 35 million Hispanics are concentrated." St. Paul Pioneer Press (January 25, 2002) A2.]

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The Impact of the 2001/2002 Economic Recession on Hispanic Workers: A Cross-Sectional Comparison of Three Generations. By Arturo Gonzalez, University of Arizona. Prepared for the Pew Hispanic Center, Pew Charitable Trusts and USC Annenberg School for Communication. (The Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) January 2002. 34 p.; Appendices.

Full Text at: www.pewtrusts.com/pdf/vf_pew_hispanic_recession.pdf

["Tourism's Lost Workers; The Plight of Low-earning Immigrants, Many of Them in the Hotel Industry: California's Latino unemployment rate rose to 7.1 percent last month, well above the state's overall 5.3 percent.... Youth and lack of experience in the work force are also contributing to rising unemployment, particularly among the U.S.-born children of Latino immigrants ... according to the study." San Diego Union-Tribune (January 27, 2002) H1.]

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New Lows from New Highs: Latino Economic Losses in the Current Recession. By Roberto Suro and Lindsay Lowell, Pew Hispanic Center, Pew Charitable Trusts (The Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) January 2002. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.pewtrusts.com/pdf/vf_pew_hispanic_lows.pdf

["Recession Is Hitting Latinos Hardest; Their Unemployment Rate is About 2 Points Higher Than the U.S. Rate, A New Report Finds: Job woes will continue to jolt Latinos well after the current recession ends and could be a serious problem for at least through the end of 2004." Contra Costa Times (January 25, 2002) D1.]

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UTILITIES

Operational Audit of the California System Operator. By Vantage Consulting. Prepared for the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. (Vantage, Cudjoe Key, Florida) 2002. 111 p.

Full Text at: www.vantageconsulting.com/caisoaudit.pdf

["This audit was performed to determine the areas, if any, in which the California Independent System Operator could enhance its effectiveness in fulfilling its responsibilities to operate the transmission system under its control and administer real-time energy markets. The report includes a set of global recommendations with an implementation plan that summarizes the need for a broad based plan for fixing the system."]

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EDUCATION

AFFIRMATIVE ACTION

“Testing and Diversity in Postsecondary Education: The Case of California.” By Daniel Koretz and others. IN: Education Policy Analysis Archives, vol. 10, no. 1 (January 7, 2002) Various pagings; Tables.

Full Text at: epaa.asu.edu/epaa/v10n1/

["Policymakers and postsecondary institutions in many states are searching for ways to maintain the diversity of student populations without resorting to a prohibited focus on race. In response to these changes, this study used data from California and a simplified model of the University of California admissions process to explore how various approaches to admissions affect the diversity of the admitted student population."]

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AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAMS

Evaluation of California’s After School Learning and Safe Neighborhoods Partnership Program: 1999-2001. By the Department of Education, University of California, Irvine and Healthy Start and After School Partnerships Office, California Department of Education. (The Department, Irvine, California) February 2002. 48 p.

Full Text at: www.cde.ca.gov/afterschool/fullevalrpt.pdf

[“Youngsters who participated in an after-school program aimed at some of the state's neediest children showed improvements in attendance and academic achievement, according to a report.... Results found… improved grade-point averages and achievement in standardized tests … improved behavior … and reduced grade retention.” The Sacramento Bee (February 2, 2002) 1.]AS

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BILINGUAL EDUCATION

"The Linguistic Landscape of California Schools." By Sonya M. Tafoya, Public Policy Institute of California. California Counts: Population Trends and Profiles, vol. 3, no. 4 (February 2002) 16 p.

Full Text at: www.ppic.org/publications/CalCounts11/calcounts11.pdf

["Of the nation's 3.4 million students identified as English learners, 41 percent reside in California.... California's English learners speak numerous languages. In 1988, the California Department of Education tracked 48 languages; and by 2000, eight more.... An understanding of English learners is important because they are particularly vulnerable academically ... and they are a sizable and growing segment of the school-age population."]

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CHARTER SCHOOLS

Progress of Education Reform 1999-2001: Charter Schools. By the Education Commission of the States, vol. 3 no. 2 (November/December 2001) 4 p.

Full Text at: www.ecs.org/clearinghouse/31/88/3188.pdf

["The mechanisms put in place to approve, monitor and close [charter] schools have the potential to fundamentally change how public education is governed, and have provoked a heated debate.... Amidst the clamor, a growing body of research may help shape the direction of the charter school movement. This issue briefly reviews these research findings."]

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CLASS SIZE REDUCTION

Class Size Reduction in California: Findings from 1999-00 and 2000-01. Edited by Brian M. Stecher, Rand and George W. Bohrnstedt, American Institutes For Research. Technical Report. Prepared for the California Department of Education. (The Department, Sacramento, California) February 2002. 162 p.

Full Text at: www.classize.org/techreport/year3_technicalreport.pdf

["Role of Class Size in Success Unclear; Study Cannot Separate the 20-Student Limit From Other Reforms in Explaining Academic Improvements: A consortium of think tanks found that nearly all California public school districts have adopted the size reduction program.... Rand researcher Georges Vernez said 'All of this raises the question of whether some of the money that is used for CSR might not be more productively used elsewhere' Rand researcher Georges Vernez said." Los Angeles Times (February 5, 2002) 8.]

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HIGHER EDUCATION

Building Standards in Higher Education. By Elizabeth G. Hill, Legislative Analyst's Office. (The Office, Sacramento, California) January 2002. 13 p.

Full Text at: www.lao.ca.gov/2002/bldng_standards/building_standards.pdf

["In this report we examine how the California Community Colleges, California State University, and the University of California use three key types of building standards -- construction cost guidelines, space standards, and utilization standards. We find that they are not being used uniformly by the segments, resulting in construction costs that are higher than necessary and possible over-statement of facilities needs. As a result, we make various recommendations for improvements to make them more useful to the Legislature."]

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Report of the Commission on the Growth and Support of Graduate Education: Item for Discussion. Prepared for the Committee on Educational Policy, University of California Office of the President. By the Office of the President, University of California. (The Office, Berkeley, California) September 5, 2001. 34 p.

["The Commission has produced an action plan that will require the University to develop significantly expanded partnerships with federal agencies, the state government, industry, foundations, and individual donors over the next five years as well as make some important internal changes."]

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EMPLOYMENT

GLASS CEILING

A New Look Through the Glass Ceiling: Where are the Women? The Status of Women in Management in 10 Selected Industries. U.S General Accounting Office. (The Office, Washington, DC) January 2002. 17 p.

Full Text at: www.equality2020.org/glass.pdf

["Study: Female Pay Gap Widens: Managers' Wages Fell Relative to Their Male Counterparts: The report ... tracked the status of women in 10 industries in 1995 and 2000. It found that full-time female managers earned less than male managers in all cases, and that their relative salaries declined over the five years in seven fields. Sacramento Bee (January 28, 2002) D1.]

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UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFITS

Two Million Workers Will Likely Exhaust Their Regular Unemployment Insurance Benefits in the First Half of 2002. By Wendell Primus and Jessica Goldberg, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. (The Center, Washington, DC) February 6, 2002. 3 p.

Full Text at: www.cbpp.org/2-6-02ui.pdf

["The Center ... said up to two million people might exhaust their benefits in the first half of this year. About 7.9 million people are unemployed, and the unemployment rate in January was 5.6 percent." New York Times (February 7, 2002) A22.]

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ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES

ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY

Implementing Proactive Environmental Management: Lessons Learned from Best Commercial Practice. By Frank Camm and others, National Defense Research Institute. Prepared for the Office of the Secretary of Defense. MR-1371. (RAND, Santa Monica, California) 2001. 67 p.

Full Text at: www.rand.org/publications/MR/MR1371

["To understand how leading firms were implementing their new policies, we identified two firms involved in activities analogous to those in each of the four key policy areas in DoD. We conducted case studies for each of these firms. The case studies provided information on the organizational contexts of the implementations, information critical to any effort to transfer these lessons from a commercial setting to the setting in which DoD operates."] 3-day loan.

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FISHERIES

Draft Biological Assessment of the Effects of the Proposed Actions Related to Klamath Project Operation April 1, 2002 - March 31, 2012 on Federally-Listed Threatened and Endangered Species. By the Klamath Basin Area Office, Bureau of Reclamation, Department of the Interior. (The Department, Washington, DC) January 24, 2002. 103 p.

Full Text at: www.doi.gov/news/bioassessment.pdf

["Release of the draft marks the start of a flurry of activity that should by April 1 decide how the water is divided between fish and farmers.... The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Agency and the National Marine Fisheries Service ... have the scientific responsibility for determining whether changes are needed to ensure the survival of the suckerfish and salmon." Los Angeles Times (January 29, 2002) B7".]

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LAND USE

"Saving Agriculture or Saving the Environment." By Alvin D. Sokolow and Cathy Lemp. "Agricultural Easements Limited Geographically." By Alvin D. Sokolow. "Landowners, While Pleased with Agricultural Easements, Suggest Improvements." By Ellen Rilla. "Central Valley Leaders Cautious About Agricultural Easements." By Alvin D. Sokolow. IN: California Agriculture, vol. 56, no. 1 (January-February 2002) pp. 6-25.

["Easements have been employed for conservation purposes in the United States for more than a century.... But their application to expressly maintain land in commercial farming, usually in relation to nearby urbanization, is a relatively recent development.... We examine several aspects of this critical issue. The collection presents a descriptive overview of California's use of the agricultural easement technique, and provides a basis for considering new research in an emerging area of public policy."]

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WATER

The New Economy of Water: The Risks and Benefits of Globalization and Privatization of Fresh Water. By Peter H. Gleick and others, Pacific Institute for Studies in Development, Environment, and Security. (The Institute, Oakland, California) February 2002. 12 p.

Full Text at: www.pacinst.org/reports/new_economy_of_water_ES.pdf

["A California think tank's report says that the world's freshwater resources are more threatened now than they have ever been, facing such challenges as degraded water quality, climate change and wetland destruction.... The report is meant to provide an overview of issues facing the world's water supply, many of which are discussed individually. It looks at water-related diseases, destruction and degradation of freshwater ecosystems, pollution and climate change. It's important to have an overview of water issues because they all affect each other, said Peter Gleick, director of the institute and the report's lead author." Associated Press (January 20, 2002) 1.]

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GENERAL GOVERNMENT

CAMPAIGN FINANCE

"An Essay on Federal Income Taxation and Campaign Finance Reform." By Daniel L. Simmons, Professor of Law, University of California, Davis. IN: Florida Law Review, vol. 54, no. 1 (January 2002) pp. 1-89.

["This article explores the structure of campaign finance reform, the role of political organizations under that system, and the federal tax policy that affects the income taxation of this form of entrepreneurial activity. Decades of campaign finance reform have had little impact on the influence of money in the electoral process.... This examination of federal income taxation of political campaign finance and legislative activity begins with a search for overriding policy objectives."]

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ELECTION REFORM

2001 State Election Reform. By Jennifer Drage Bowser, National Conference of State Legislatures. Legisbrief. Vol. 10, No. 3. (NCSL, Denver, Colorado) January 2002. 2 p.

["State legislatures have been hard at work in reforming state elections.... Few states have enacted sweeping election reforms.... Florida passed a sweeping election reform bill that addresses everything from voting machines and ballot design to voter education and poll worker recruitment and training."]

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Election Law Journal. Edited by Daniel H. Lowenstein and Richard L. Hasen. Vol. 1, No. 1. (Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., Larchmont, NY) January 2002. 138 p.

Full Text at: www.catchword.com/~1291/v1n1/contp1.htm

[Includes: "The Party Line;" "Election Reform;" "The Equal Protection of Voting Rights Act;" "Unpacking Page v. Bartels: A Fresh Redisticting Paradigm Emerges in New Jersey;" "Internet Politics 2000: Overhyped, Then Underhyped, the Revolution Begins;" "Initiatives and the new Single Subject Rule; "Recent Election Law Documents; and others."] 3-day loan.

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INITIATIVES & PROPOSITIONS

The California Initiative Process: How Democratic is it? By the Public Policy Institute of California. (The Institute, San Francisco, California) February 7, 2002. 6 p.

Full Text at: www.ppic.org/publications/occasional/InitiativeHandoutCmmnwlthOP.pdf

["The survey data indicate that Californians favor direct democracy in part because they distrust government. As a result, voters have taken on more responsibility for policy decisions.... But the survey evidence also indicates that voters lament the sheer number of initiatives ... and suspect the motives behind many measures.... Policymaking through the process has become less predictable. Along with a distrust of government by voters, this unpredictability can be added to the list of policy challenges facing the state."]

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Are There Winners and Losers? Race, Ethnicity, and California’s Initiative Process. By the Public Policy Institute of California. (The Institute, San Francisco, California) 2001. 100 p.

Full Text at: www.ppic.org/publications/PPIC152/ppic152.full.pdf

["The authors assess whether whites have dominated the initiative process at the expense of Latinos, Asian Americans, and African Americans. The PPIC Survey shows that over 75 percent of the population surveyed prefers the initiative process.... For all initiatives over the last 20 years, blacks, Latinos and Asian Americans have roughly the same probability as whites of voting on the 'winning side' of the initiative."]

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STATE GOVERNMENTS

State of the States: A Stateline.org Report. By the Pew Center on the States. (The Center, Washington, DC) 2001. 58 p.

["We highlight what states did in 2001 that was important to combat terrorism, improve public education and healthcare, reform the election process, streamline the delivery and reduce the cost of electric energy and reconcile development with preservation of the environment. We've also tried to identify some policy mistakes."]

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STATE REVENUES

“Severe Decline in State Tax Revenue.” By Nicholas W. Jenny. IN: State Tax Notes (January 7, 2002) pp. 41-54.

[“After a year of slowing tax revenue growth, state tax revenue fell into a severe and widespread decline in the July-September quarter of 2001…. Sales tax collections were substantially unchanged from a year ago, while corporate income taxes were down by more than 25 percent from the previous year, the fourth straight – and by far the largest quarter of decline. When adjusted to reflect the efforts of legislated changes and inflation, real state tax revenue declined by 5 percent, which is the sharpest drop since April-June 1991.”]

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VOTERS & VOTING

Absentee Voting for March 5th Primary Election Begins Today: News Release. By Bill Jones, California Secretary of State. (The Secretary, Sacramento, California) February 4, 2002. 1 p.

Full Text at: www.ss.ca.gov/executive/press_releases/2002/02-023.htm

["California Vote-By-Mail Trend Gets Another Boost: Absent a major scandal, the trend in California seems clear -- voting from home is more popular every year.... Until this year, permanent absentee status was limited to those who had lost a limb, could not walk unaided or who suffered from blindness, lung disease or another ailment that limited their mobility. Now anyone can request and keep that status as long as he does not miss an election." Sacramento Bee (February 3, 2002) L5.]

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HEALTH

BIOTECHNOLOGY

Cloning Californians? Report of the California Advisory Committee on Human Cloning. (The Committee, Sacramento, California) January 11, 2002. 49 p.

Full Text at: www.scu.edu/SCU/Centers/Ethics/publications/adbdreport.html

["Rather than extend the current moratorium, 'we concluded that the Legislature should pass, and the governor should sign, a flat ban with no expiration date,' putting the burden on cloning advocates to push for any future reversal of the state's ban. The panel was also unanimous in recommending 'that California should not prohibit but should reasonably regulate human non-reproductive cloning' in connection with research into the medical uses of embryonic stem cells." San Francisco Chronicle (January 11, 2002) A1.]

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DRINKING WATER

Hartwell Corporation et al. v. The Superior Court of Ventura County et al. Supreme Court of California. S082782. February 4, 2002. Various pagings.

["Victims of contaminated water can sue utilities regulated by the state for violating safe drinking water standards, the California Supreme Court ruled.... The San Gabriel Valley lawsuits are the first in the state in which water agencies have been sued for selling contaminated water.... The defendants all sought to dismiss the lawsuits on grounds that the state Public Utilities Commission has jurisdiction over such matters." Sacramento Bee(February 5,2002) A5.

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MINORITIES

Urban Indian Health. By Ralph Forquera, Seattle Indian Health Board. Prepared for The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Issue Brief. (The Foundation, Menlo Park, California) November 2001. 23 p.

Full Text at: www.kff.org/content/2001/6006/6006Revised.pdf

["The purpose of this Issue Brief is to describe the large and growing urban Indian population, their health status, and the major federal health programs and federal-state programs that are available to improve Native Americans' access to needed health services."]

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NEONATAL CARE

The Right Start for America's Newborns: A Decade of City and State Trends (1990-1999). By Richard Wertheimer and others. Child Trends/Kids Count Working Paper. Prepared for The Annie E. Casey Foundation (The Foundation, Baltimore, Maryland) February 2002. 20 p.

Full Text at: www.aecf.org/kidscount/rightstart2002/working_paper.pdf

["Using birth certificate data provided by the National Center for Health Statistics, we focus on eight measures which reflect a healthy start to life. These measures are provided for the country as a whole, for all 50 states and the District of Columbia, and for the 50 largest cities. The eight measures are: Teen Births; Repeat Teen Births; Births to Unmarried Women; Births to Mothers with Low Educational Attainment; Late or No Prenatal Care; Smoking During Pregnancy; Low-Birthweight Births; [and] Preterm Births."]

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NURSES

Governor Gray Davis Announces Proposed Nurse-To-Patient Ratios: Press Release. By the Office of the Governor. (The Office, Sacramento, California) January 22, 2002. 2 p. And Hospital Minimum Nurse Staffing Ratios: AB 394 (2001/02). Governor Gray Davis. (Governor’s Office, Sacramento, California) January 22, 2002. 1 p.

Full Text at: www.governor.ca.gov/govsite/msdocs/press_release/PR02_023_Nurse_to_Patient_attach.doc

["We can't have nurses straining to provide care to a growing population... California will become the first state in America to establish ratios of nurses to patients. We're doing it for a simple reason: To improve care. The more nurses, the better the care." Sacramento Bee (January 23, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S4234]

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TOXICOLOGY

Creating Safe Learning Zones: Invisible Threats, Visible Actions. And California State Schools within ½ Mile of a Superfund Site. By the Center for Health, Environment and Justice. (The Center, Falls Church, Virginia) January 2002. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.childproofing.org/CA/calist.html

["New schools are being built on or near chemically-contaminated land or near industrial facilities with toxic emissions that contaminate children's air, water, land, and food supply.... The report is the outcome of a nationwide effort to eliminate practices that place children at risk from chemicals in their environment -- particularly schools, parks, and playgrounds."]

[Request #S4235]

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HUMAN SERVICES

ADOPTION

"Coparent or Second-Parent Adoption by Same-Sex Parents." By the Committee on Psychosocial Aspects of Child and Family Health, American Academy of Pediatrics. IN: Pediatrics, vol. 109, no. 3 (February 2002) pp. 339-340.

Full Text at: www.aap.org/policy/020008.html

["The American Academy of Pediatrics ... is announcing its support for the right of gay men and lesbians to adopt their partner's children.... Legalizing second parent adoptions, the academy said in its statement is in the best interest of children, because it guarantees the same rights and protections to homosexual families that are routinely accorded to heretosexual parents and their children." Sacramento Bee (February 4, 2002) A1.]

[Request #S4231]

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"Gay Adoption." By Kristen Kreisher. IN: Children's Voice (January 2002) Child Welfare League of America. (The League, Washington DC.) 5 p.

Full Text at: www.cwla.org/articles/cv0201gayadopt.htm

["Child Welfare League of America's Standards of Excellence for Adoption Services state, 'Applicants should be assessed on the basis of their abilities to successfully parent a child needing family membership and not on their race, ethnicity or culture, income, age, marital status, religion, appearance, differing lifestyles, or sexual orientation.'... Studies examining children raised by a gay parent or parents have shown no difference in developmental outcomes as compared with children raised by heterosexual parents."]

[Request #S4236]

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CALWORKS

CalWORKS Project Research: Alcohol and Other Drugs, Mental Health, and Domestic Violence Issues: Need, Incidence, and Services: Executive Summary. By Daniel Chandler and Joan Meisel, California Institute for Mental Health. (The Institute, Sacramento, California) January 2002. 6 p.

["Virtually all California counties have adopted the strategy that participants with AOD/MH/DV issues should be identified and offered services as early in the CalWORKs welfare-to-work process as possible....The information in this report addresses this interest in early identification and provision of treatment/services by focusing on 'need' for services and actual receipt of services. The report summarizes information from two rounds of intensive research interviews with a random sample of 643 women."]

[Request #S4237]

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FOSTER CARE

Foster Care Today. By Kathy Barbell and Madelyn Freundlich, Casey Family Programs National Center for Resource Family Support (The Center, Washington DC) 2001. 46 p.

Full Text at: www.casey.org/cnc/documents/foster_care_today.pdf

["As foster care faces new and increasing demands, policies and practice must respond in ways that ensure that children, their families, and their caregivers receive the highest quality service possible. [The report] begins with the examination of foster care at the start of the 21st century by looking at the demographic trends that currently shape foster care ... The conclusion ... looks to the future of foster care."]

[Request #S4238]

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POVERTY

Supports for Working Poor Families: A New Approach. By Michael E. Fishman and Harold Beebout. Mathematica Policy Research. (Mathematica, Princeton, New Jersey) December 2001. 32 p.

Full Text at: www.mathematica-mpr.com/PDFs/supportpoor.pdf

["Unfortunately, the promise of earnings plus participation in work support programs for improving family well-being is not being fully realized. The objective of this paper is to present innovative policy options for improving access to work support programs. Because access for working families appears most problematic for the Food Stamp Program, this paper focuses on food assistance benefits."]

[Request #S4239]

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TEEN PREGNANCY

"The Perils of Early Motherhood." By Isabell Sawhill. IN: The Public Interest, No. 146 (Winter 2002) pp. 1-11.

Full Text at: www.brook.edu/views/articles/sawhill/2002winter.pdf

["Children growing up in a one-parent family are four times as likely to be poor as those growing up in a two-parent family, and those growing up in a single-parent white family are three times more likely to be poor than those growing up in a two-parent black family.... The real problem is too many unmarried women having babies."]

[Request #S4240]

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"Abstaining from Sex." By Isabel V. Sawhill. IN: Blueprint Magazine, Issue 14 (January/February 2002). Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.ndol.org/blueprint/2002_jan-feb/19_abstaining.html

["Four out of 10 girls become pregnant before their twentieth birthdays and two out of 10 go on to become single mothers. These high rates of teen pregnancy contribute to high rates of out-of-wedlock childbearing, increased numbers of single-parent families, welfare dependency and child poverty.... Sex education, after-school programs, and family planning services ... need to be supplemented by direct efforts to change the culture."]

[Request #S4244]

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TEMPORARY ASSISTANCE FOR NEEDY FAMILIES

Funding Issues in TANF Reauthorization. By Zoe Neuburger, and others, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (The Center, Washington DC) February 5, 2002. 24 p.

Full Text at: www.cbpp.org/1-22-02tanf5.pdf

["[This report] discusses the issues that arise from the current-law funding structure ... the fixed funding level of the block grant ....the large disparities in block grant allocations among states, and the lack of a mechanism to provide additional resources to states during recessions.... [It] then discusses how states have used their TANF funds over the past five years. A discussion of reauthorization proposals then follows."

[Request #S4241]

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TRANSPORTATION

FUEL CONSUMPTION

Base Case Forecast of California Transportation Energy Demand: Staff Draft Report. By Chris Kavalek and others, California Energy Commission. (The Commission, Sacramento, California) December 2001. 12 p.

Full Text at: www.energy.ca.gov/reports/2001-12-19_600-01-019.PDF

["This staff report was prepared as part of the AB 2076 (Chapter 936, Statutes of 2000) analysis. The statute directs the commission and the Air Resources Board to develop and submit a strategy to the Legislature to reduce petroleum dependence in California. This staff report responds to the requirement that the commission include a base case forecast of gasoline, diesel and petroleum consumption in 2010 and 2020."]

[Request #S4242]

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WASHINGTON READER

An Analysis Of The President's FY 2003 Budget: Special Report. By the California Institute. (The Institute, Washington, DC) February 4, 2002. 16 p.

["This document provides a quick, California-oriented analysis of the proposal prepared by the staff of the California Institute."]

[Request #S4245]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

EDUCATION

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

Preschool For All: Investing in a Productive and Just Society. By the Research and Policy Committee, Committee for Economic Development (The Committee, New York, New York) 2002. 64 p.

Full Text at: www.ced.org/docs/report/report_preschool.pdf

["Fund Preschool For All Kids, Business Leaders Say: The business-backed Committee called for federal and state governments to pay for voluntary prekindergarten for all children, starting at age 3... The Committee recommended 'publicly funded prekindergarten, offered by a variety of (public and private, for-profit and non-profit) providers.'" Cox News Service (February 5, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S4246]

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ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES

FISHERIES

Scientific Evaluation of Biological Opinions on Endangered and Threatened Fishes in the Klamath River Basin. By William M. Lewis, University of Colorado, and others. (National Academy Press, Washington, DC) 2002. 26 p.

Full Text at: www.nap.edu/catalog/10296.html

["The National Academy of Sciences has concluded that federal biologists had no scientific justification for their efforts to protect endangered fish by withholding water from farmers in the drought-ravaged Klamath Basin of the Pacific Northwest last year.... The evaluation by the independent academy found that far more farm-friendly proposals by another federal agency -- the Bureau of Reclamation, which runs the irrigation project -- were also unjustified by science." Washington Post (February 4, 2001) A01. NOTE: Scientific Evaluation ... will be available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S4217]

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HUMAN SERVICES

ADVOCACY FOR CHILDREN

A Child Advocacy Primer: Experience and Advice from Service Providers, Board Leaders, and Consumers. By Karabelle Pizzigati. Child Welfare League of America. (The League, Washington DC) February 2002. TC

["This volume provides valuable asistance and advice to service-based agencies seeking to develop and expand policy advocacy as an intergral part of their work. Based on experiences from the field ... it offers tips on how service agencies can increase their policy advocacy capacity."]

[Request #S4247]

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WELFARE REFORM

Children and Welfare Reform. IN: The Future of Children. By the David and Lucile Packard Foundation. v.12, no. 1. (The Foundation, Palo Alto, California) February 20, 2002.

[Includes: "Children and Welfare Reform: Analysis and Recommendations;" "The 1996 Welfare Law: Key Elements and Reauthorization Issues Affecting Children;" "Reforms and Child Development;" "Experimental Studies of Welfare Reform and Children;" "Welfare Reform and child care options for low-income families; "Welfare Reform, Fertility, and Father Involvement;" and others.]

[Request #S4248]

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INTERNATIONAL READER

Caught in the Middle: Border Communities in an Era of Globalization. Edited by Demetrios Papademetriou and Deborah Waller Meyers. (Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Washington, DC) October 2001. 340 p. TC

[Includes: “Self-Governance Along the U.S.-Canada Border: A View from Three Regions,” “Transborder Community Relations at the U.S.-Mexico Border: Laredo/Nuevo Laredo and El Paso/Ciudad Juarez,” “Between Order and Chaos: Management of the Westernmost Border Between Mexico and the United States,” “National Borders: Images, Functions, and Their Effects on Cross-Border Cooperation in North America and Europe,” “At the Crossroads: Russian-Chinese Border Interactions,” “The Russia-Kazakhstan Border: A Comparison of Three Regional Cases,” “The Development of Free Movement in the European Union,” and others.]

[Request #S4249]

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